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Mum

English translation: No

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22:06 Jul 7, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Mum
Quick question for speakers of US English from a Brit, I've heard Mom used a lot, Ma less so, but do you use Mum? or is that more a UK English specific word.

(I'd also be interested in what contractions for Mother are used by speakers of other dialects of English)

TIA
Peter Coles
Local time: 12:37
English translation:No
Explanation:
Except in the expression "Mum's" the word = I won't say a thing.

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Note added at 2003-07-07 22:10:49 (GMT)
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It\'s funny, because the same question came up the other day in the Russian pages, when somebody wanted to know how to translate Mamuchka.

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Note added at 2003-07-07 22:12:49 (GMT)
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Southerners say Ma and Pa or Mammy and Pappy (really backwoods). Northerners say Mom and Dad and little kids say Mommy and Daddy. Irreverant teenagers say the Old Man and the Old Lady (but the latter can refer to one\'s wife as well)

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Note added at 2003-07-08 00:34:19 (GMT)
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Here\'s the Russian question about Mamochka, hot off the press: http://www.proz.com/glossary/471346
Selected response from:

William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 05:37
Grading comment
My thanks to Kim and Nancy, but to William the points for demonstrating more enthusiaism and application than the question really deserved.

William we've crossed before on the English pages, the French pages and the Japanese pages, but I promise that (for the time being) you're safe on the Russian pages!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +15No
William Stein
4 +1mom
Kim Metzger
3Mom, Mommy (smaller children),Nancy Arrowsmith


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +15
No


Explanation:
Except in the expression "Mum's" the word = I won't say a thing.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-07 22:10:49 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It\'s funny, because the same question came up the other day in the Russian pages, when somebody wanted to know how to translate Mamuchka.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-07 22:12:49 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Southerners say Ma and Pa or Mammy and Pappy (really backwoods). Northerners say Mom and Dad and little kids say Mommy and Daddy. Irreverant teenagers say the Old Man and the Old Lady (but the latter can refer to one\'s wife as well)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-07-08 00:34:19 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here\'s the Russian question about Mamochka, hot off the press: http://www.proz.com/glossary/471346

William Stein
Costa Rica
Local time: 05:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 36
Grading comment
My thanks to Kim and Nancy, but to William the points for demonstrating more enthusiaism and application than the question really deserved.

William we've crossed before on the English pages, the French pages and the Japanese pages, but I promise that (for the time being) you're safe on the Russian pages!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: perfect!
8 mins

agree  Catherine Norton: Mum is also short for "mummy" which is an alternate spelling for"Mommy" which small children use. Mum also means without speech. For example, if a question is asked and the answerer is "mum", he/she is not answering.
13 mins

agree  jccantrell: In the USA, it's gotta be mom, and apple pie, of course.
20 mins

agree  Fuad Yahya
23 mins

agree  Refugio: I also used to hear Momma or Mama, but not so much lately.
29 mins

agree  J. Leo
1 hr
  -> Thanks, James and everybody!

agree  xxxOso: ¶:^)
1 hr
  -> Thanks, I forgot Papa Bear and Mama Bear!

agree  uparis: My Irish friends seem to use "Mum" a lot - don't know if that's typical
8 hrs

agree  Rowan Morrell: Mum/Mummy is British English (also used in New Zealand and Australia). Mom/Mommy is US English.
8 hrs

agree  airmailrpl
9 hrs

agree  Сергей Лузан: w/Rowan Morrell & http://www.proz.com/glossary/471346
10 hrs

agree  Katherine Matles: I've also heard "mom and pops" :-)))
12 hrs

agree  xxxIno66
17 hrs

agree  Derry
12 days

agree  AhmedAMS
25 days
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
mom


Explanation:
Hello Peter. I've never heard an American use Mum. Ma is used in the South and other rural areas in America. You'll hear momma too.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 06:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sunshine King
25 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Mom, Mommy (smaller children),


Explanation:
Mother (neutral), Ma and Pa (southern).

Mum, Mummy, and Mater are all on the other side of the Atlantic.
My daughter calls me Mami, but she grew up in Austria...

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Note added at 2003-07-08 13:29:25 (GMT)
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Mom and Pop

Nancy Arrowsmith
Local time: 05:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 60
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