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male version of "maiden name" or "née"

English translation: Surname at birth (but see other answers)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:male version of "maiden name" or "née"
English translation:Surname at birth (but see other answers)
Entered by: Alison Schwitzgebel
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10:31 Dec 18, 2003
English to English translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: male version of "maiden name" or "née"
I have a document to translate and the gentleman in question changed his name (I assume when he got married). What do we use in English in this case? If he were a woman I would use either "maiden name" or "née".

Thanks!

Alison
Alison Schwitzgebel
France
Local time: 11:27
Surname at birth
Explanation:
I think is how I would approach it

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Note added at 2003-12-18 10:34:39 (GMT)
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In the USA, I believe the favo(u)red expression would be \"last name\" at birth.

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Note added at 2003-12-18 12:24:16 (GMT)
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To Dorene: Your comment below could not have been faulted if you had directed it to Sven\'s reply.

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Note added at 2003-12-18 14:28:29 (GMT)
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Yes, there is a trap here (see Dusty); you really do need to know whether they are requiring his name AT BIRTH, or at any other point, if he has changed his name. What a pity we can\'t edit our comments to those who comment on us....sorry, Dorene, I feel I was perhaps out of order here....
Selected response from:

David Moore
Local time: 11:27
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +19formerly
Sven Petersson
4 +2Surname at birthDavid Moore
5Pippin Michelli
4 +1birth name / name at birthntext
3 +2birth name / family name
jerrie
4born...xxxCMJ_Trans
5 -1a.k.a.
Paula Vaz-Carreiro
3originally named
Cilian O'Tuama


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Surname at birth


Explanation:
I think is how I would approach it

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-18 10:34:39 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In the USA, I believe the favo(u)red expression would be \"last name\" at birth.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-18 12:24:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To Dorene: Your comment below could not have been faulted if you had directed it to Sven\'s reply.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-18 14:28:29 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, there is a trap here (see Dusty); you really do need to know whether they are requiring his name AT BIRTH, or at any other point, if he has changed his name. What a pity we can\'t edit our comments to those who comment on us....sorry, Dorene, I feel I was perhaps out of order here....

David Moore
Local time: 11:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 864

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alaa Zeineldine: on both accounts.
19 mins

agree  Terry Gilman: US also uses surname, we just don't write "Christian name," so the pair is typically first name(s), last name(s)
36 mins

agree  Nado2002
1 hr

disagree  Dorene Cornwell: I would not assume he has changed his name only once since birth
1 hr
  -> Totally irrelevant. That's not the question, now is it???

agree  Cilian O'Tuama
2 hrs

disagree  Tony M: ...slightly, with your sugegstion, and totally with the tone of your reply to Dorene. Actually, I agree with her comment; this MAY have been his previous name, but it is NOT NECESSARILY the name he had at birth!
3 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
birth name / family name


Explanation:
Maybe...


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Family_name
jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Terry Gilman: have also seen this in this née context in parentheses (birth name: Bond)
35 mins

agree  airmailrpl: family name
2 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +19
male version of
formerly


Explanation:
;o)

Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 11:27
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 156

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxIanW: I'm sure David's answer is correct, but I prefer this one. Nice one, Sven!
18 mins
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  mbc
24 mins
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Stefanie Sendelbach: yeah, I also like the Sven's idea
38 mins
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  nyamuk: Like the artist formerly known as Prince, now if we could only get everyone to agree.
42 mins
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Dorota Cooper
44 mins
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Nado2002
58 mins
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Dorene Cornwell: or "previously"
1 hr
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Aisha Maniar
1 hr
  -> Thank you very much!

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: and if he married (and changed names) twice?
2 hrs
  -> Question not understood.

agree  Tony M: Yes, this is the safest option, since we do not know enough about the circumstances to risk being more specific; and it is certainly used.
3 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Lisa Lloyd
3 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  jccantrell: good choice
5 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  RHELLER: this is still evolving
5 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Terry Gilman: Nice to see so much harmony. Must be the season.
9 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Lesley Clayton
11 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Jörgen Slet: sounds best and assumes nothing that we don't know
15 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Gordon Darroch
1 day 1 hr
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Laurel Porter
1 day 22 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Montefiore
2 days 9 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!

agree  Mario Marcolin: :)
3 days 7 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!
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22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
born...


Explanation:
option
Joe Bloggs born Smith

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 11:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 376
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
male version of
a.k.a.


Explanation:
a.k.a. (Also Known As)
adv : as known or named at another time or place;

Formerly \For"mer*ly\, adv.
In time past, either in time immediately preceding or at any
indefinite distance; of old; heretofore.

(OmniDictionary)

I think "formerly" is probably right for your document, as Sven suggested. But a.k.a. is also used and so I leave it as one more suggestion that may be helpful.
Good work.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 31 mins (2003-12-18 13:02:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

P.S. I\'d say it is pretty rare for a man to change his name on marrying. He may well have changed his name by \'Deed Pool\' which is the way people officially change name and/or surname in the UK (http://www.ukdps.co.uk/Google.html)

Paula Vaz-Carreiro
Local time: 10:27
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 167

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxTatiana Nero
26 mins
  -> Thanks Tatiana

disagree  Tony M: Not strictly safe, since 'a.k.a.' implies MAY STILL BE KNOWN AS (i.e. 2 names at the same time), whereas it is clear that he has CHANGED his name, and so is no longer known by the name he formerly was.
47 mins
  -> Fair comment. I offered it as a possible alternative depending on context.

disagree  Laurel Porter: Sorry, Paula, but in the US this definitely has criminal implications, like "alias". I agree that Sven's suggestion is safest.
1 day 19 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
originally named


Explanation:
another one, though I'd go with David (or Sven if you're sure the guy only married once)

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Note added at 2003-12-18 14:39:27 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

bachelor name
premarital name
pre-marriage name
?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-18 14:42:56 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

birth certificate (sur)name
(sur)name on birth certificate
?


Cilian O'Tuama
Local time: 11:27
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 447
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
male version of
birth name / name at birth


Explanation:
*


    Reference: http://www.google.de/search?q=%22name+at+birth%22&ie=UTF-8&o...
    Reference: http://www.google.de/search?num=100&hl=de&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&...
ntext
United States
Local time: 04:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 379

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD
5 hrs
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1 day 5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5


Explanation:
You could try "né", the original French word without the feminizing extra E on the end. This would be correct, although possibly too abstruse?

Pippin Michelli
Local time: 04:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 19

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Laurel Porter: Abstruse,yes - but interesting. Sadly, most Americans would be completely flummoxed by this...
16 hrs
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