being white

English translation: having white skin

16:32 Mar 2, 2018
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Medical - Other
English term or phrase: being white
In an extensive analysis of analgesic practices associated with these procedures, the researchers reported that the likelihood of receiving opioids was a factor of preprocedure pain intensity, having a femoral sheath removed, being white, and procedure duration.

This is from the paper on pain. I cannot understand what does this "being white" mean. Would you please teach me?

Thank you.
Sue-my
Local time: 17:44
English translation:having white skin
Explanation:
I haven't been able to find any references to back up my answer but from what I understand, people with white skin usually receive more opioids than people with dark skin. Their pain threshold is lower.

It demonstrates that beliefs about biological differences between blacks and whites—beliefs dating back to slavery—are associated with the perception that black people feel less pain than do white people and with inadequate treatment recommendations for black patients’ pain

http://www.pnas.org/content/113/16/4296

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Note added at 35 mins (2018-03-02 17:08:38 GMT)
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Although pain tolerance varies greatly from one person to the next, the idea that these differences fall along racial lines is unequivocally false. Yet these unfounded beliefs have real effects on public health. In emergency rooms, for example, doctors are less likely to prescribe opioid painkillers for migraines and back pain to black Americans than to white or Latino Americans.

Those same beliefs may also help explain why the nationwide epidemic of opioid overdoses has mainly hit rural white towns, rather than black communities.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/danvergano/race-pains?utm_term=.okx...

A 2008 review of 13 years of national survey data on emergency room visits found that for a pain-related visit, an opioid prescription was more likely for white patients (31 percent) than black patients (23 percent).

https://www.amren.com/news/2013/06/i-dont-feel-your-pain/
Selected response from:

Helena Chavarria
Spain
Local time: 10:44
Grading comment
Thank you very much!!
I expected this kind of answer.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +9having white skin
Helena Chavarria
3 -1being pale
Posted via ProZ.com Mobile
Simona Pop


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
being pale


Explanation:
pale/ colorless

Simona Pop
Romania
Local time: 11:44
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian, Native in HungarianHungarian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: This isn't simply about being a little pale, it's a specifically racial point: being black / white; look at it in the context of the text as a whole: why would merely being pale affect whether or not your were given pain-killers?
1 hr
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +9
having white skin


Explanation:
I haven't been able to find any references to back up my answer but from what I understand, people with white skin usually receive more opioids than people with dark skin. Their pain threshold is lower.

It demonstrates that beliefs about biological differences between blacks and whites—beliefs dating back to slavery—are associated with the perception that black people feel less pain than do white people and with inadequate treatment recommendations for black patients’ pain

http://www.pnas.org/content/113/16/4296

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 35 mins (2018-03-02 17:08:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Although pain tolerance varies greatly from one person to the next, the idea that these differences fall along racial lines is unequivocally false. Yet these unfounded beliefs have real effects on public health. In emergency rooms, for example, doctors are less likely to prescribe opioid painkillers for migraines and back pain to black Americans than to white or Latino Americans.

Those same beliefs may also help explain why the nationwide epidemic of opioid overdoses has mainly hit rural white towns, rather than black communities.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/danvergano/race-pains?utm_term=.okx...

A 2008 review of 13 years of national survey data on emergency room visits found that for a pain-related visit, an opioid prescription was more likely for white patients (31 percent) than black patients (23 percent).

https://www.amren.com/news/2013/06/i-dont-feel-your-pain/

Helena Chavarria
Spain
Local time: 10:44
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Thank you very much!!
I expected this kind of answer.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Exactly corresponds with the source text analysis.
47 mins
  -> Thank you, Tony :-)

agree  philgoddard
2 hrs
  -> Cheers, Phil :-)

agree  Charles Davis
3 hrs
  -> Thank you, Charles :-)

agree  Ewa Dabrowska
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, Ewa :-)

agree  Piyush Ojha
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, Piyush :-)

agree  Sarah Lewis-Morgan
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, Sarah :-)

agree  Yvonne Gallagher
6 hrs
  -> It's always nice when people agree with you! Thank you, Yvonne :-)

agree  Gianna Senesi
6 hrs
  -> Thank you, Gianna :-)

agree  acetran
2 days 2 hrs
  -> Thank you, acetran :-)
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