Salt

English translation: idiom "worth one's salt" misused here: probably meant "worth one's while"

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English term or phrase:salt
English translation:idiom "worth one's salt" misused here: probably meant "worth one's while"
Entered by: Charles Davis

06:36 Aug 17, 2018
English to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Other
English term or phrase: Salt
n the meantime, DC’s triumph needs not to be supported any more by discussion and conviction,because of obvious performance, process and stability reasons. Advantages of DC, as faster disintegration, and possibly dissolution, less working steps, as well asless heat and moisture burden are generally accepted. However, approaching individual formulations, space for wild speculation and uncertainty is still given, how much cost-effectiveness may be achieved by an appropriative change in process, and by using mono-, or multi-component DC grades in comparison to its mostly wet granulated PAMs. For many pharmaceutical companies there still remain crucial questions: What will be the monetary impact changing my process from WG to DC? How deciding, which specific formulation is worth one’s salt to be changed, and at which priority?

In the last line, what does "salt" mean?
Important thing?

Thank you!!
Sue-my
Local time: 08:27
idiom "worth one's salt" misused here: probably meant "worth one's while"
Explanation:
There is an idiom in English, to be worth one's salt, meaning to be competent, to be good at your job. (The origin is that people were once paid for their work in salt, which is where the word "salary" comes from.) But this idiom doesn't make sense here: you can't say that something is "worth your salt" to be changed (or to change). There is another idiomatic phrase, "worth your while", and I suspect this is what the writer meant. It means useful enough to be worth the time and effort. In practice, it really just means "which specific formulation is worth changing".

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/worth-yo...
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/worth-yo...
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 01:27
Grading comment
Thank yioiu for your time and efforts.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7idiom "worth one's salt" misused here: probably meant "worth one's while"
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
salt
idiom "worth one's salt" misused here: probably meant "worth one's while"


Explanation:
There is an idiom in English, to be worth one's salt, meaning to be competent, to be good at your job. (The origin is that people were once paid for their work in salt, which is where the word "salary" comes from.) But this idiom doesn't make sense here: you can't say that something is "worth your salt" to be changed (or to change). There is another idiomatic phrase, "worth your while", and I suspect this is what the writer meant. It means useful enough to be worth the time and effort. In practice, it really just means "which specific formulation is worth changing".

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/worth-yo...
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/worth-yo...

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 01:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 72
Grading comment
Thank yioiu for your time and efforts.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  missdutch: excellent explanation! / Tutto bene, grazie Charles. I hope the same for you! :-D
41 mins
  -> Thanks very much! (Tutto bene?) // Yes, fine, thanks :-)

agree  Nicholas Hallsworth
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nicholas!

agree  philgoddard
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Phil!

agree  Tina Vonhof
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Tina!

agree  B D Finch
10 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Daryo
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Daryo!

agree  Amar Paul Singh: Yes: how to determine whether, for a particular formulation, it is worthwhile to change the tablet production process from wet granulation (WG) to direct compression (DC)
4 days
  -> Thanks for the clarification!
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