vine-draped

English translation: vines growing up the walls of the cafés

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:vine-draped
English translation:vines growing up the walls of the cafés
Entered by: Yvonne Gallagher

02:00 Mar 11, 2019
English to English translations [PRO]
Other
English term or phrase: vine-draped
Going to Nakazakicho feels like stepping through the Narnian cupboard into a different world. Exploring the maze of lanes reveals vine-draped cafes, boutique restaurants, and a range of tiny, trendy businesses from yoga and tea shops, to galleries of handmade trinkets.


I could not understand this "vine-draped".

Please advice!

Thank you so much!
Sue-my
Local time: 00:27
vines growing up the walls of the cafés
Explanation:
(i.e. grape vines)

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Note added at 5 days (2019-03-16 10:46:34 GMT) Post-grading
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Glad to have helped.

Just for the record, as Phil said, vines can be other "vining" plants as well ("vining" means the way they grow, but NOT all "climbing" plants are "vines" either). However, in a café context I'd expect the vines to be grape vines. In a bar, hop vines (for beer) but if you have a word for "vines" then use it without having to specify the type.
Selected response from:

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 16:27
Grading comment
Thank you so much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4vines growing up the walls of the cafés
Yvonne Gallagher
3 +1covered with vines / adorned with vines / overlaid with vines
JohnMcDove
5 -1Cafes with vine on the suface of their buldings
Sina Salehi
3 +1covered with vine
Dariusz Saczuk


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
covered with vine


Explanation:
P

Dariusz Saczuk
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JohnMcDove
29 mins
  -> Thank you, John.

agree  philgoddard: It may not be grapevines - vine can mean any climbing plant.
2 hrs
  -> True. Thank you, Phil.

disagree  Sina Salehi: You should mention that they are grown on the surface of buildings. It was a typo.
2 hrs
  -> First, you should learn how to spell correctly. Gown???

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: "covered" is not a synoynm for "draped" and it's plural vineS
8 hrs
  -> This was just a quick, general explanation. Thanks for your comment.
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Cafes with vine on the suface of their buldings


Explanation:
-

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Note added at 32 mins (2019-03-11 02:33:06 GMT)
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Building, of course.

Sina Salehi
Iran
Local time: 18:57
Native speaker of: Native in Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JohnMcDove
6 mins
  -> Thanks John!

agree  Ashutosh Mitra
1 hr
  -> Thanks Ashutosh!

disagree  philgoddard: This is not good English, and we've already had two good answers.//Cafés don't have buildings, they are buildings.
1 hr
  -> Cafes do have buidings I think. The building is the structure, while the cafe itself refers to both the structure and whatever within that structure

disagree  Yvonne Gallagher: with Phil. Not standard English at all. 100%??
7 hrs
  -> The same answer that I gave Phil.

disagree  B D Finch: Not very natural English. "Buildings" is redundant, as is "surface" (the vines would hardly be growing up the interior of the brickwork).
3 days 9 hrs
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
covered with vines / adorned with vines / overlaid with vines


Explanation:
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/drape

1.1 Cover or wrap loosely with folds of cloth.
‘the body was draped in a blanket’

While the definition applies to cloth, in your context it is being used figuratively as if the "vines" were the "clothes" of the "cafe's buildings"

So, the synonyms, covered with vines, adorned with vines, overlaid with vines, would give you the idea, as noted by the proZ.comleagues.

Here are some images,

CLOCK overlaid with vines and leaves.
https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/hannam...

http://harcourts.co.za/Property/301041/ECT36893/Quigney

https://www.kansaiscene.com/2016/06/find-your-niche-in-nakaz...

This one is "ivy-drapped" (4th picture) but that is the idea,

http://peakwalking.blogspot.com/2016/07/bentley-bridge-lumsd...

JohnMcDove
United States
Local time: 08:27
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  British Diana
7 hrs
  -> Thank you very much, British Diana. :-)

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: "overlaid" not really correct here John for living vines. Only this one blog entry on Google for "buildings overlaid with vines"//clock ref. not appropriate in context of living vines.
8 hrs
  -> Thank you very much, Yvonne. :-) Understood, but you also have the example of the "CLOCK overlaid with vines and leaves." And many other Google hits... But yes, I guess these are not always "living"...

neutral  B D Finch: I like "adorned", but "overlaid" is quite wrong for this context, even if it is OK for your clock.
3 days 8 hrs
  -> Thank you very much. :-) Yes, I understand that...
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
vines growing up the walls of the cafés


Explanation:
(i.e. grape vines)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 days (2019-03-16 10:46:34 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Glad to have helped.

Just for the record, as Phil said, vines can be other "vining" plants as well ("vining" means the way they grow, but NOT all "climbing" plants are "vines" either). However, in a café context I'd expect the vines to be grape vines. In a bar, hop vines (for beer) but if you have a word for "vines" then use it without having to specify the type.

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 16:27
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 92
Grading comment
Thank you so much!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JohnMcDove: /../ You're welcome. The picture Björn found is perfect... :-)
28 mins
  -> Many thanks:-)

agree  Björn Vrooman: Best way to describe it. Don't agree with Phil; covered with vines sounds like you need to have a machete handy to get to your coffee. John had a good idea, though: A picture would help. You can use this one: https://www.mondayswholefoods.com
5 hrs
  -> Many thanks:-). Yes, too tired last night to look for pic. Thanks, this one is good depiction of "vine-draped" walls

disagree  Sina Salehi: The adjective is used to describe "cafes" and not the "vines."
6 hrs
  -> Well yes..."Draped" means the vines are growing up (and hanging loosely off) the café walls

agree  Jennifer Caisley: This sounds the most natural, to my ear!
11 hrs
  -> Many thanks:-) Indeed!

agree  Tina Vonhof
12 hrs
  -> Many thanks:-)

agree  B D Finch
3 days 9 hrs
  -> Many thanks:-)
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