School non-attendance

English translation: long-term/chronic truancy / long-term/chronic absenteeism

02:55 Aug 22, 2019
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other
English term or phrase: School non-attendance
The following is the title of the paper.
On Creating a Program for School Counseling: Based on the proposal of the investigative committee on Futoko (School non-attendance) in Sendai

Is "School non-attendance" understable?

Or "school refusers or non-attandant at school"?

Please advice.
Sue-my
Local time: 20:37
English translation:long-term/chronic truancy / long-term/chronic absenteeism
Explanation:
"School non-attendance" is understandable.

"School refusers" wasn't something immediately familiar to me, but there are a few references online using it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_refusal
"Truancy and school withdrawal are often mislabelled as school refusal. Truancy or ‘wagging’ is when young people have unapproved absences without their parents’ consent or knowledge, and will generally stay away from the family home. School withdrawal occurs with parent consent and involves young people who may be carers or who are working to contribute to the household.
School refusal is when young people ‘can’t’ rather than ‘won’t’ go to school. It is defined as a “child-motivated refusal to attend school or difficulty attending classes or remaining in school for an entire day”.
"
https://www.governmentnews.com.au/24691/ & https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/getting-school-refus...
"The term ‘school refusers’ can incorporate pupils with varying difficulties who, for whatever reason, do not attend school regularly. Research has shown that practitioners use the term ‘school refuser’ in different ways. Sometimes it is used interchangeably with the term ‘school phobics’, but at other times school refusers refers to a broader group of pupils with more general issues of non-attendance relating to disaffection."
http://www.schoolrefuser.org.uk/

Although "school refusal"/"school refusers" might be appropriate, it also seems to be less likely to be understood by non-specialists, and also subject to different interpretations even by experts.
The above-claimed 'definitions' of truancy/wagging are not necessarily correct, or at least not universally accepted.

"Non-attandant at school" is grammatically odd/wrong: you probably meant "non-attandance at school".

The jargon expression in the context of students skipping classes at school (incl. whole days) would be "truancy".
http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetailsKids.aspx?...
You might also find the slang word "to wag" applied to students skipping lessons (incl. whole days) at school.
http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetailsKids.aspx?...
Of more general scope, the word "absenteeism" could also be applied.
https://enezaeducation.com/absenteeism-in-school/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absenteeism
Please note that the above terms are all focussed on students who are enrolled.

If you need to emphasise the long time frame (30 days or more of consecutive absence), then you can use "chronic" or "long-term".
https://www.alrc.gov.au/publications/10-children-education/t...
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027277571...
https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/gradesch...

~~~~~
If you had needed to also/only include students who are not enrolled, then expressions such as "non-attendance" or "unenrolled" may have been more appropriate.
https://lsa.umich.edu/math/undergraduates/policies/policy-on...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 hrs (2019-08-23 01:23:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, there was a spelling mistake in my 'correction', it should be: "non-attendance at school".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 hrs (2019-08-23 01:27:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, it wasn't clear to me whether "Futoko" refers to the situation or to the students themselves.
If you wanted a translation of "Futoko", then maybe you'd get good advice by posting a Japanese to English Translation query.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 9 hrs (2019-08-23 12:17:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thinking about it further, although "non-attendance" is understandable, I feel that it is unnecessarily broad. "Non-attendance" could include absence from school because of a family holiday or illness (including absences lasting for weeks or even months). That is, absences which the school has been notified about in advance and has 'approved'.

By contrast, "truancy" and "absenteeism" would exclude absence for reasons that the school would deem 'legitimate'. "Truancy" and "absenteeism" generally involve absences not notified in advance, and not 'approved'.

"Truancy" and "absenteeism" can refer to the student being absent from school because they are bored, angry, sad, scared, anxious, etc. Or maybe there's something else the student prefers to do. The main point is that those terms are generally focussed on the student's thoughts/feelings/plans.
I suppose those words could also encompass a case in which (say) a student greatly disagreed with religious (or atheistic) teaching at school, although in such a situation a word like "boycott" might be more evocative.
Selected response from:

D. I. Verrelli
Australia
Local time: 22:37
Grading comment
Thank you very much! I know that MEXT (Japanese ministry of education) uses non0attendance at school"
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2long-term/chronic truancy / long-term/chronic absenteeism
D. I. Verrelli


Discussion entries: 11





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
school non-attendance
long-term/chronic truancy / long-term/chronic absenteeism


Explanation:
"School non-attendance" is understandable.

"School refusers" wasn't something immediately familiar to me, but there are a few references online using it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_refusal
"Truancy and school withdrawal are often mislabelled as school refusal. Truancy or ‘wagging’ is when young people have unapproved absences without their parents’ consent or knowledge, and will generally stay away from the family home. School withdrawal occurs with parent consent and involves young people who may be carers or who are working to contribute to the household.
School refusal is when young people ‘can’t’ rather than ‘won’t’ go to school. It is defined as a “child-motivated refusal to attend school or difficulty attending classes or remaining in school for an entire day”.
"
https://www.governmentnews.com.au/24691/ & https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/getting-school-refus...
"The term ‘school refusers’ can incorporate pupils with varying difficulties who, for whatever reason, do not attend school regularly. Research has shown that practitioners use the term ‘school refuser’ in different ways. Sometimes it is used interchangeably with the term ‘school phobics’, but at other times school refusers refers to a broader group of pupils with more general issues of non-attendance relating to disaffection."
http://www.schoolrefuser.org.uk/

Although "school refusal"/"school refusers" might be appropriate, it also seems to be less likely to be understood by non-specialists, and also subject to different interpretations even by experts.
The above-claimed 'definitions' of truancy/wagging are not necessarily correct, or at least not universally accepted.

"Non-attandant at school" is grammatically odd/wrong: you probably meant "non-attandance at school".

The jargon expression in the context of students skipping classes at school (incl. whole days) would be "truancy".
http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetailsKids.aspx?...
You might also find the slang word "to wag" applied to students skipping lessons (incl. whole days) at school.
http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetailsKids.aspx?...
Of more general scope, the word "absenteeism" could also be applied.
https://enezaeducation.com/absenteeism-in-school/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Absenteeism
Please note that the above terms are all focussed on students who are enrolled.

If you need to emphasise the long time frame (30 days or more of consecutive absence), then you can use "chronic" or "long-term".
https://www.alrc.gov.au/publications/10-children-education/t...
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027277571...
https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/gradesch...

~~~~~
If you had needed to also/only include students who are not enrolled, then expressions such as "non-attendance" or "unenrolled" may have been more appropriate.
https://lsa.umich.edu/math/undergraduates/policies/policy-on...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 hrs (2019-08-23 01:23:40 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, there was a spelling mistake in my 'correction', it should be: "non-attendance at school".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 hrs (2019-08-23 01:27:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, it wasn't clear to me whether "Futoko" refers to the situation or to the students themselves.
If you wanted a translation of "Futoko", then maybe you'd get good advice by posting a Japanese to English Translation query.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 9 hrs (2019-08-23 12:17:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Thinking about it further, although "non-attendance" is understandable, I feel that it is unnecessarily broad. "Non-attendance" could include absence from school because of a family holiday or illness (including absences lasting for weeks or even months). That is, absences which the school has been notified about in advance and has 'approved'.

By contrast, "truancy" and "absenteeism" would exclude absence for reasons that the school would deem 'legitimate'. "Truancy" and "absenteeism" generally involve absences not notified in advance, and not 'approved'.

"Truancy" and "absenteeism" can refer to the student being absent from school because they are bored, angry, sad, scared, anxious, etc. Or maybe there's something else the student prefers to do. The main point is that those terms are generally focussed on the student's thoughts/feelings/plans.
I suppose those words could also encompass a case in which (say) a student greatly disagreed with religious (or atheistic) teaching at school, although in such a situation a word like "boycott" might be more evocative.

D. I. Verrelli
Australia
Local time: 22:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Thank you very much! I know that MEXT (Japanese ministry of education) uses non0attendance at school"

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
2 hrs

agree  B D Finch
6 hrs

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: "truancy"/"absenteeism" give the wrong idea here. I've encountered several cases of children just refusing to go to school and in the end having to get home tutoring (at great expense to the taxpayer)
9 hrs
  -> I'm happy to learn from your experience, but how then do you define "truancy"/"absenteeism"?

neutral  Daryo: agree with Yvonne Gallagher - it makes quite a difference if it's "truancy" motivated by lack of motivation - or deliberate avoidance based on some kind of principles.
14 hrs
  -> I'm not convinced that "truancy" implies lack of motivation (if that's what you're saying). There could be lots of reasons for truancy, I would have thought. If you think "truancy" is too broad, maybe "Futoko" needs to be defined in more detail.
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