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toot'n

English translation: you had better believe it / you bet / what you say is right, and had better not forget it

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11:36 Apr 2, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other
English term or phrase: toot'n
"Darned toot'n, I am. "Darned toot'n".

I understanding this is a bit slangish; I just wanted to understand the contraction in "toot'n".

Thanks in advance!
CristinaPereira
Local time: 20:08
English translation:you had better believe it / you bet / what you say is right, and had better not forget it
Explanation:
As a native U.S. English speaker, I can confirm that "darned toot'n" means "you had better believe it / you bet / what you say is right, and had better not forget it."

The word "toot'n" absolutely, 100% means this and nothing else when combined with the word "darned". Very confident about this (I am personally very conservative is using the "5" confidence level).

The expression is old, something that people use today to be slightly quirky or funny while at the same time emphatic. It has connotations with the Old West.

Very sure about this. Good luck!
Selected response from:

Todd Field
United States
Local time: 13:08
Grading comment
Yes, at first I just wanted to know what the contraction meant, but then I realized I didn't understand it all the same. And, second yes, it has to do with the West and cowboys. Thanks everybody!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +5you had better believe it / you bet / what you say is right, and had better not forget it
Todd Field
5 +1indeed, you know the answer
Hacene
4 +2IMHO toot'n = tooting = drunkard
Alexander Onishko
5 +1useful ref.
DGK T-I
3 +2toot (one's) own horn
Ray Luo
3a contraction
chica nueva
3toot--pass gas
Heidi Stone-Schaller
3darned
DGK T-I


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
IMHO toot'n = tooting = drunkard


Explanation:
...

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Note added at 2004-04-02 12:05:23 (GMT)
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indeed - this is the first meaning

toot1

toot1 [toot] noun (plural toots)
sound of vehicle horn: the high-pitched hooting sound that a vehicle’s horn makes, or a similar sound

verb (past toot·ed, past participle toot·ed, present participle toot·ing, 3rd person present singular toots)
1.intransitive and transitive verb make short hooting sound: to make, or cause the horn of a vehicle to make, a short high-pitched hooting sound
2.intransitive verb pass gas: to pass gas noisily (slang)

[Early 16th century. An imitation of the sound.]

—toot·er, noun

Encarta® World English Dictionary © & (P) 1999 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Developed for Microsoft by Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.

but there is also the second meaning -

toot2

toot2 [toot] noun (plural toots) (slang)
1.drinking bout: a bout of heavy drinking
2.inhaled illegal substance: a quantity of an illegal drug, especially cocaine, taken by inhaling through the nose

intransitive and transitive verb (past toot·ed, past participle toot·ed, present participle toot·ing, 3rd person present singular toots)
inhale illegal substance: to inhale an illegal drug, especially cocaine (slang)

Encarta® World English Dictionary © & (P) 1999 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Developed for Microsoft by Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.

Alexander Onishko
Local time: 22:08
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DGK T-I: agree that it is a contraction of "tootin" and "tooting" - not sure about the derivation (I'd always assumed it was from (tooting)blowing a horn or whistling to announce that one is on the way,full of energy,fight,etc-but hard drinking plausible sometimes
13 mins
  -> Thank you , doc ! - see my comment above

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
31 mins
  -> Thank you !

agree  elenus
1 hr
  -> Thank you !

disagree  Kim Metzger: The slang phrase has nothing to do with drunkards, Alexander. You'd need a dictionary of American idioms to find an explanation.
12 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
toot (one's) own horn


Explanation:
It might be 'toot (one's) own horn'

Ray Luo
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:08
Native speaker of: Native in ChineseChinese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DGK T-I: I'd always assumed that this was the derivation (as in "I'm a rooting tooting [something]".Or could it be derived from "toting"the old american word for carrying things,as found in MKR's"The Yearling"written in the backwoods of Florida long ago?
6 mins

neutral  Alexander Onishko: why then "darned " ? :)
11 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
21 mins
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43 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
darned


Explanation:
I presume the "darned" (or damned for that matter) provides the emphasis, with an effective meaning like "downright", "extremely", "determinedly".


DGK T-I
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:08
PRO pts in category: 12
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
toot--pass gas


Explanation:
That's another slang sense of "tooting" I'm familiar with.

Heidi Stone-Schaller
Local time: 21:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
indeed, you know the answer


Explanation:
"You are an entrepreneur" and the other answers: "too right, I am".


Hacene
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:08
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DGK T-I: I must admit,I had thought the asker knew the meaning of"toot'n"from the begnning,and just wanted to understand what words it was a contraction for-but I see from the notes the asker wanted to know what it meant too.That is the answer,anyway.
1 hr
  -> thank you
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
you had better believe it / you bet / what you say is right, and had better not forget it


Explanation:
As a native U.S. English speaker, I can confirm that "darned toot'n" means "you had better believe it / you bet / what you say is right, and had better not forget it."

The word "toot'n" absolutely, 100% means this and nothing else when combined with the word "darned". Very confident about this (I am personally very conservative is using the "5" confidence level).

The expression is old, something that people use today to be slightly quirky or funny while at the same time emphatic. It has connotations with the Old West.

Very sure about this. Good luck!

Todd Field
United States
Local time: 13:08
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Yes, at first I just wanted to know what the contraction meant, but then I realized I didn't understand it all the same. And, second yes, it has to do with the West and cowboys. Thanks everybody!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  maryrose: As my mother says this at the drop of a hat I can confirm absolutely what you say! 100% issimo correct.
13 mins

agree  DGK T-I: agree meaning & old west meaning,from all those old westerns(but for curiosity:does it derive from determinedly hooting/tooting on a horn because of great confidence,energy or the willingness to fight about it,as I always imagined,or something else?)
28 mins

agree  ntext
1 hr

agree  AllisonK
3 hrs

agree  Kim Metzger: I can't find the origin of "tootin" either, but the OED says it's "used as an emphatic affirmative or intensive." I agree with Giuli that it's probably related to 'tooting' - blowing your horn.
9 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
not for kudos
useful ref.


Explanation:
The above members are a ref.in their own right on such matters,so a ref.isn't really needed about the meaning(but to give one anyway)
"darn tooting"
"that is true, I agree, darn right"
eg: "They still talk about the winter of 1907, don't they, Helmer?" "Darn tootin'! It was a cold one!"
(darn - 'damn' polite form of expletive for emphasis)


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Note added at 3 hrs 46 mins (2004-04-02 15:22:34 GMT)
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(I mean Todd & Monica are references in their own right on such matters...)

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Note added at 3 hrs 47 mins (2004-04-02 15:24:06 GMT)
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ref.WM Idioms:

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Note added at 7 hrs 23 mins (2004-04-02 19:00:03 GMT)
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http://home.t-online.de/home/toni.goeller/idiom_wm/id151.htm

Oxford English Dictionary
\"tootin\' \"
That which toots, as a horn, siren, etc. See also \'rootin\' tootin\' \' s.v. ROOTING ppl. see:
\"rootin\' tootin\' \"
(b) slang (chiefly N. Amer.), noisy, rumbustious, boisterous; rip-roaring, lively.
[(a) dialect. rare, inquisitive, meddlesome; ]
1948 Sun (Baltimore) 7 Jan. 13/1 Basketball games today have developed into rootin\', tootin\' contests, with more of the emphasis on the tootin\'. 1949 N.Y. Times Bk. Rev. 27 Mar. 32 ‘Smoke up the Valley’ is actually a rootin\'-tootin\' romance of blazing six-shooters and gore. 1963 New Statesman 24 May 786/3, I also..expressed mild surprise about a rootin\' tootin\' night club that advertised ‘Girls! Girls! Girls!’

\"tooting\"
U.S. slang. Used, usu. with preceding adv. or adj. (as damn or var.), as a strong affirmative or intensive.

1932 Amer. Speech VII. 338 You\'re damn tootin\', emphatic affirmative. 1933 E. CALDWELL God\'s Little Acre i. 12 ‘After the albino, Pa?’ Buck asked. ‘You\'re durn tooting, son,’ he said. 1952 B. MALAMUD Natural 36 You\'re plumb tootin\' crazy. 1970 E. BERCKMAN She asked for It xi. 134 You\'re goddam\' tootin\' I\'m on that again. Y\'say I\'ve been prying, you admit there\'s something to pry into. 1981 G. MCDONALD Fletch & Widow Bradley xviii. 72, I got pregnant, when you said I wouldn\'t... You tol\' me a tootin\' lie.

There does seem to be evidence that tooting/tootin\'/toot\'n in \'darn tootin\' \' or damn \'tootin\' \', as well as \'rootin\' tootin\' \' is derived from hooting, blowing horns and making a loud noise.










    Reference: http://home.t-online.de/home/toni.goeller/idiom_wm/id151.htm
DGK T-I
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:08
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger: Just one of those nonsense phrases like the ones Shakespeare liked to employ.
8 hrs
  -> ah,sound and fury signifying nothing ;-)
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
a contraction


Explanation:
"You're darn(ed) tooting right, I am. You're darn(ed) tooting right."

That's the way I read it. 'tooting' being a sort of 'amplifier'

darn = a euphemism for 'damn' (Collins Concise English Dictionary) and 'tooting' being a euphemism for whatever you like...

(where I come from, we might say 'You're damn bloody right, I am.')

Could be a mock oath for polite company, or a women's version. Women commonly used to say darn, instead of damn (so that they didn't 'swear')

chica nueva
Local time: 08:08
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
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