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cheese on

English translation: make enthusiastic

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:cheese on
English translation:make enthusiastic
Entered by: Sven Petersson
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

14:34 Oct 9, 2001
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: cheese on
This is an ad. I've never heard "cheese on" before and I can't find it anywhere. Could somebody explain (if this is indeed English???). Note: the whole text is rather messy and I strongly suspect it has not been written by a native speaker.
"Send your sweetheart a Love Message to Cheese her On"
Daphne b
Sweden
Local time: 23:14
make enthusiastic
Explanation:
"cheese on" is a new construction from the British expression "cheese off" (introduced 1941).

cheesed off > bored; fed-up; annoyed; upset
Selected response from:

Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 23:14
Grading comment
Thanks everyone for chipping in. I know about "cheese off", but thought that "cheese on" as an opposite was too far-fetched. Most of you seem to agree on that, though, so I'll go for it! I wish I could give kudoz to all of you, but as we all know, I can only give points to one of you. I'll go for Sven's answer, based on the Oxford Dictionary (and not his geriatric brain, this time!)
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5to make her day / to cheer her up
jgal
5it looks quite native to me...
Bertha S. Deffenbaugh
5make enthusiastic
Sven Petersson
4Read my explanation below
Katherine Matles
1to make her smile
Maya Jurt
1"mouse up"patpending


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
to make her smile


Explanation:
wild guess

People taking photographs ask the one's they portray to say "cheese", to copy the expression of a smile.

Maya Jurt
Switzerland
Local time: 23:14
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 19
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
it looks quite native to me...


Explanation:
HiDaphne,

I know the expression CHEESE OFF, and have heard it here in the USA very often.

CheeseD OFF MEANS = ANNOYED.

I am wondering whether cheesse ON COULD mean exactly the opposite ( make happy)

Unfortunately my husband, who is american, is not available at the moment. He knows all this stuff.

But , to me, it all looks quite native indeed.

Regards,

BSD

Bertha S. Deffenbaugh
United States
Local time: 15:14
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Read my explanation below


Explanation:
Cheese on is an expression we definitelty use in English, but usually it means to motivate someone to do something (that they don't want to do in a lot of cases.) Here I think it really means to keep the relationship strong.(to reaffirm his love for her)

Katherine Matles
Spain
Local time: 23:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
make enthusiastic


Explanation:
"cheese on" is a new construction from the British expression "cheese off" (introduced 1941).

cheesed off > bored; fed-up; annoyed; upset



    Reference: http://homepage.tinet.ie/~nobyrne/a-zcompact.htm#C
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 23:14
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 156
Grading comment
Thanks everyone for chipping in. I know about "cheese off", but thought that "cheese on" as an opposite was too far-fetched. Most of you seem to agree on that, though, so I'll go for it! I wish I could give kudoz to all of you, but as we all know, I can only give points to one of you. I'll go for Sven's answer, based on the Oxford Dictionary (and not his geriatric brain, this time!)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Katherine Matles: This is a very old expression in America!
14 mins
  -> My source is "The Oxford Dictionary of Slang", 1999 edition. What is yours?

agree  xxxAbu Amaal: way to go dude
5 hrs
  -> Thank you very much!
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
"mouse up"


Explanation:
not serious...

I think the other colleagues may have guessed the meaning of this.

It sounds totally foreign to me, sounds like something made up out of VIZ!

patpending
Local time: 22:14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO): No, our colleagues are right on!
15 mins
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
to make her day / to cheer her up


Explanation:
Yes, 'cheesed off' is a politer way than 'p***ed off' of saying 'fed up' or cross.

'Cheese on' looks like a play on words based on this, but if I had to translate in into 'normal' English, I would probably use one of these two expressions...

HTH

Julia

jgal
Local time: 23:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 112
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