bravery

English translation: courage

13:16 Apr 17, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / -synonims
English term or phrase: bravery
"In many Mezzo-American cultures, the jaguar symbolized bravery and skill. Its highly regarded fur could only be worn by young men who had proven ther bravery."

The Spanish original uses the same word, "valentía", in both instances.
I´d like to use a different one. Note that in the jaguar´s case, both bravery ans skill are human traits attributed to the animal.

What about if I substitute ¨fearlessness" or such other word in one of the instances. Or should I leave it just as is?
George Rabel
Local time: 22:06
English translation:courage
Explanation:
Well, I reckon that could be used to replace either one of your occurences of 'bravery'.

In fact, I think 'fearlessness' would indeed be a more appropriate term to apply to the jaguar, and you could then still use 'bravery' for the young men (feeling-wise, I think that works marginally better than 'courage')

Another word, nicely old-fashioned today, but which could work in the latter instance for the young men, is 'valour'

[OED: Def. 2 The quality of character which enables a person to face danger with boldness or fortitude; courage, bravery, esp. in battle.]

This sort of goes with 'when a knight won his spurs...', 'valiant knights', 'valour in battle', etc. and so seems to me eminently suited to your needs; as well as being reassuringly similar to your original Spanish 'valentia'
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 04:06
Grading comment
Much appreciated, Dusty. As you suggested, I used "fearlessness" for the cat and "bravery" for the braves. Robert´s "proven their mettle" is eminently suitable, and I would have used it if the text had dealt with Zulus, Dayaks, Huns, Samurai, Mongols,or Marines, but I was loath not to use the word "bravery" in reference to a native American culture.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +11courage
Tony M
5 +5mettle
Robert Donahue (X)
5 +1bravery
bigedsenior
4courageousness, fearlessness, courage, fortitude, valor, intrepidity
swisstell
3 +1courage
hirselina


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +11
courage


Explanation:
Well, I reckon that could be used to replace either one of your occurences of 'bravery'.

In fact, I think 'fearlessness' would indeed be a more appropriate term to apply to the jaguar, and you could then still use 'bravery' for the young men (feeling-wise, I think that works marginally better than 'courage')

Another word, nicely old-fashioned today, but which could work in the latter instance for the young men, is 'valour'

[OED: Def. 2 The quality of character which enables a person to face danger with boldness or fortitude; courage, bravery, esp. in battle.]

This sort of goes with 'when a knight won his spurs...', 'valiant knights', 'valour in battle', etc. and so seems to me eminently suited to your needs; as well as being reassuringly similar to your original Spanish 'valentia'

Tony M
France
Local time: 04:06
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 256
Grading comment
Much appreciated, Dusty. As you suggested, I used "fearlessness" for the cat and "bravery" for the braves. Robert´s "proven their mettle" is eminently suitable, and I would have used it if the text had dealt with Zulus, Dayaks, Huns, Samurai, Mongols,or Marines, but I was loath not to use the word "bravery" in reference to a native American culture.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  hirselina: Yes!
2 mins
  -> Thanks, hirselina!

agree  David Sirett: with courage and valour. Fearlessness is different: a person who has no fear can't really be said to be brave or courageous IMO.
3 mins
  -> Thanks, David! That was exactly my point: the animal 'fearlessness' of a jaguar might be compared with the 'courage' of a young warrior

agree  Amy Williams
17 mins
  -> Thanks, Amy!

agree  Java Cafe
29 mins
  -> Thanks, J/C!

agree  Dina Abdo
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Hera!

agree  tappi_k
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Tappiti!

agree  Aisha Maniar
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Aisha!

agree  Can Altinbay: Nice, Dusty. I'm afraid I have to attaboy Robert, too, though.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Can! Don't be afraid --- be brave! ;-))) I like his choice of word, but I don't honestly think it can be used in this way as a drop-in replacement for what is after all the SAME pair of words in Spanish; see what I mean?

agree  giogi
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Giovanna!

agree  Alexandra Tussing
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alexandra!

agree  mrrobkoc
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Beeboy!
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
courage


Explanation:
Would be another option to avoid repetition

hirselina
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: :-)
19 mins
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
courageousness, fearlessness, courage, fortitude, valor, intrepidity


Explanation:
are all part of the thesaurus for bravery


    www.hyperdictionary.com/thesaurus (bravery)
swisstell
Italy
Local time: 04:06
Works in field
Native speaker of: German
PRO pts in category: 16
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
mettle


Explanation:
I would suggest "mettle" as a substitute for the second "bravery". The term "to prove one's mettle" is common without being cliche and as you can see from the definition below, it has all of the qualities you want.

met·tle n. 1. Courage and fortitude; spirit: troops who showed their mettle in combat. 2. Inherent quality of character and temperament. --idiom. on (one's) mettle. Prepared to accept a challenge and do one's best. [Variant of metal.] This is from the American Heritage Dictionary.

Examples;
For the U.S. Marine Corps, however, this was the battle that proved their mettle to themselves and the world, and in the process garnered them the nickname "Devil Dogs." Their mascot, the bulldog, came from a town fountain.

The men that Britain mistakenly dismissed as mere "savages with sticks" proved their mettle that day, January 22, although superior British firepower later succeeded in subduing the Zulus - but not without a struggle.

It was a shame that there had to be a loser as both men proved their mettle and gave the crowd their money’s worth and then some.

Robert Donahue (X)
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  humbird: Good choice. I like fortitude also.
1 hr
  -> Thank you Humbird : )

agree  Can Altinbay: I like Dusty's idea of "fearlessness" for the cat, but I was bothered by the last part of the sentence, and you hit the word I wanted to come up with. That deserves a round on the house. :)
2 hrs
  -> Thank you very much Can.

agree  Will Matter
13 hrs
  -> Thanks Will

agree  jennifer newsome (X)
1 day 1 hr
  -> Thank you trickilyclever

agree  gtreyger (X)
1 day 6 hrs
  -> Thank you Gennadiy
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
bravery


Explanation:
Why change it? The jaguar symbolizes bravery. The fur is worn only by those that have proven THEIR bravery.

bigedsenior
Local time: 19:06
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Abu Amaal (X): If a word is repeated in the original, varying it unnecessarily seems a bit perverse. On the other hand if it must be changed, then "valour".
1 day 4 hrs
  -> thanks, Abu.
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