arms ending in huge fists

English translation: arms... fists...

06:28 Apr 25, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / children's literature
English term or phrase: arms ending in huge fists
He had arms ending in huge fists. Not without reason was he called the Best Smith.

Dear native English speakers!
Please advise if I should use 'arms' or hands' here. I'm inclined to use 'arms' since I believe that hands can't "end in fists" because fists ARE clenched hands. But I'm not really sure if I'm right here.
Another point: maybe it would be better to add something before 'arms' as well, say 'He had STRONG arms ending in huge fists'?
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 20:42
English translation:arms... fists...
Explanation:
I think your expression as it stands is fine. Although it is true that the word 'fist' conjures up a clenched fist, which tends to make one think of fighting, an older fashioned and now rather informal use of the word is indeed for the plain meaning 'hand'. It sounds as if this man is a blacksmith, in which case I think 'fist' is best, since it conjures up the image of strong hands gripping his tools.

We sometimes say 'fists like hams'meaning great big strong hands.

If you want to add anything before 'arms' (though I don't think you specially need to), then brawny might do too. My only query would be with the slightly weak construction 'he had... ending..' --- I'd prefer something a little more dynamic, like 'His brawny arms ended in..." -- see what I mean?

As an aside, if he is in fact a blacksmith, I'd be inclined to say 'the Best Blacksmith', since the use of 'smith' alone in this meaning is pretty rare and old-fashioned, I think most modern chldren wouldn't make the connection --- it just sounds like he is the best member of the Smith family!

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Note added at 2 hrs 46 mins (2005-04-25 09:14:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Actually, if you opt to keep your original wording for the first sentence, then I do rather agree with Mikhail that the addition of the word \'strong\' does indeed help the rhythm; sadly, my own 2-syllable suggestion of \'brawny\' probalby works less well in this respect!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 15:42
Grading comment
Thank you Dusty! I liked your comments, and no mistake. Thanks everybody!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +4arms... fists...
Tony M
4 +4arms
Attila Piróth


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
arms


Explanation:
Hands do not end in fists: hands are fists if you hold them like boxers.
Also: arms end rather in hands - but fists is acceptable.
You can add strong, but it is not essential: huge fists are usually associated with strong arms.

Attila Piróth
France
Local time: 15:42
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian
PRO pts in category: 3

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Oana Apetrei
1 min

agree  Java Cafe
13 mins

agree  Mikhail Kropotov: i think the sentence needs strong just for the rhythm...
18 mins

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
5 days
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
arms... fists...


Explanation:
I think your expression as it stands is fine. Although it is true that the word 'fist' conjures up a clenched fist, which tends to make one think of fighting, an older fashioned and now rather informal use of the word is indeed for the plain meaning 'hand'. It sounds as if this man is a blacksmith, in which case I think 'fist' is best, since it conjures up the image of strong hands gripping his tools.

We sometimes say 'fists like hams'meaning great big strong hands.

If you want to add anything before 'arms' (though I don't think you specially need to), then brawny might do too. My only query would be with the slightly weak construction 'he had... ending..' --- I'd prefer something a little more dynamic, like 'His brawny arms ended in..." -- see what I mean?

As an aside, if he is in fact a blacksmith, I'd be inclined to say 'the Best Blacksmith', since the use of 'smith' alone in this meaning is pretty rare and old-fashioned, I think most modern chldren wouldn't make the connection --- it just sounds like he is the best member of the Smith family!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 46 mins (2005-04-25 09:14:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Actually, if you opt to keep your original wording for the first sentence, then I do rather agree with Mikhail that the addition of the word \'strong\' does indeed help the rhythm; sadly, my own 2-syllable suggestion of \'brawny\' probalby works less well in this respect!

Tony M
France
Local time: 15:42
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 256
Grading comment
Thank you Dusty! I liked your comments, and no mistake. Thanks everybody!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mikhail Kropotov: helpful comments, as always :)
8 mins
  -> Spasibo, Mikhail ! :-)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Vicky!

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro: very good
2 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot, Paula!

agree  susina: susina
15 hrs
  -> Thanks, Susina!
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