with scarce so much as

English translation: not even

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:with scarce so much as
Selected answer:not even
Entered by: Michael Kislov

16:55 Apr 4, 2009
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: with scarce so much as
Dear Colleagues, it's from "Vanity Fair".

"My master would have four," said Mr. Joseph Sedley's servant, who was
in waiting; and he and Mr. Osborne's man agreed as they followed George
and William into the church, that it was a "reg'lar shabby turn out;
and with scarce so much as a breakfast or a wedding faviour.

Thank you very much in advance!
Michael Kislov
Russian Federation
Local time: 01:23
not even
Explanation:
He's very unhappy because there isn't even a wedding breakfast (traditionally with Champagne).

NB - maybe it's a misprint in the source text, but it's "favours" at the end
Selected response from:

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 23:23
Grading comment
Thank you, Sheila!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
5 +9not even
Sheila Wilson
4 +3with barely as much as
Laurie Price
4without so much as/without even
conejo


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
not even


Explanation:
He's very unhappy because there isn't even a wedding breakfast (traditionally with Champagne).

NB - maybe it's a misprint in the source text, but it's "favours" at the end

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 23:23
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 44
Grading comment
Thank you, Sheila!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jim Tucker (X): of course
13 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  JoanneEdwards
23 mins
  -> Thanks

neutral  B D Finch: I assume that you know the book - I don't. Strictly speaking shouldn't "scarce so much as" mean barely, i.e. a very meagre breakfast? One would expect lots of wedding favours so **hardly any** wedding favours would make sense.
27 mins
  -> It's certainly often that, but a wedding favour is either there or it isn't

agree  Eng2Span: When you read this account it's doubtful they gave anything at all... scarce can mean "absent" as well... even today. :-)
1 hr
  -> Thanks - as you say it's barely or not at all

agree  Simon Mac
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  cmwilliams (X)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Mark Nathan
3 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Deborah Workman
7 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  chaman4723
11 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  John Alphonse: or just "not" so much as
2 days 1 hr
  -> Thanks, that's probably what we'd say nowadays
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
with barely as much as


Explanation:
scarce < scarcely < barely

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Note added at 11 mins (2009-04-04 17:07:05 GMT)
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scarce: adj., scarc·er, scarc·est.

1. Insufficient to meet a demand or requirement; short in supply: Fresh vegetables were scarce during the drought.
2. Hard to find; absent or rare: Steel pennies are scarce now except in coin shops.

adv.

Barely or hardly; scarcely.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2009-04-04 17:07:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

from answers.com

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Note added at 22 mins (2009-04-04 17:17:37 GMT)
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in fact, probably not enough to pull together a breakfast, let alone a wedding treat (of the snack variety) ...

"Faviour" ? A typo? "Favour" instead?

Laurie Price
Mexico
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  B D Finch: I think you are right, though "scarce as much as" is an archaic phrase that can't be simply explained with modern examples of "scarce". Does the book say whether or not there was actually a wedding breakfast?
27 mins
  -> Thanks BD, I used those definitions to justify suggesting "barely" -- though yes, different century!

neutral  Eng2Span: Secnd term of the second definition you provided: "absent"... reading the book, I doubt they gave anything at all. It was quite pathetic...
1 hr
  -> Thanks Eng2Span

agree  Jeanette Phillips
3 hrs
  -> Thank you Jeanette*

agree  Gary D: hardly any breckie, maybe they put on a continental breckie, and put some flowers on the table to make it look a bit wedding like. (with a wedding flavour)
6 hrs
  -> Thanks GAry, even that sounds more abundant ...
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4 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
without so much as/without even


Explanation:
Archaic wording...
with scarce so much as = without so much as = without even

conejo
United States
Local time: 17:23
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you!

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