KudoZ home » English » Poetry & Literature

follow my course

English translation: Follow me

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
09:14 Jul 23, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / children's literature
English term or phrase: follow my course
“All right, keep your eyes on me and follow my course,” said the Raven.
He flew forward, and the boys ran after him.
(The Raven is leading the boys to a certain place.)

Dear native English speakers!
Please advise if the phrase sounds OK.
If the word 'course' doesn't work, is there anything else that could be used here?
This is my translation from Russian.
Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 17:58
English translation:Follow me
Explanation:
"Follow my course" is possible but doesn't seem appropriate. You can't say "Follow in my tracks" or "Follow in my footsteps" because the Raven is presumably flying. Why not just "Follow me"?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2005-07-23 09:26:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t think the repetition of \"me\" in the same sentence matters here. And I think I would end with an exclamation mark.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:58
Grading comment
Thank you Jack. I think I like Dusty's suggestion: "Watch where I go and follow me!" Thanks everyone!
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
3 +13Follow me
Jack Doughty
4 +3follow my lead
Clare Barnes
4 -1follow me
Johan Venter


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +13
Follow me


Explanation:
"Follow my course" is possible but doesn't seem appropriate. You can't say "Follow in my tracks" or "Follow in my footsteps" because the Raven is presumably flying. Why not just "Follow me"?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2005-07-23 09:26:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don\'t think the repetition of \"me\" in the same sentence matters here. And I think I would end with an exclamation mark.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:58
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 514
Grading comment
Thank you Jack. I think I like Dusty's suggestion: "Watch where I go and follow me!" Thanks everyone!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Armorel Young: I think follow me is best. Could you change the first "me?" - e.g. "Watch carefully and follow me"
9 mins
  -> I think you have to indicate that it is the Raven who is to be watched. Maybe "Watch what I do (or watch where I go) and follow me."

agree  David Knowles: How about "Keep your eyes open and follow me"?
27 mins
  -> Thank you. See reply to Amorel above.

agree  Angie Garbarino: keep your eyes open and follow me
30 mins
  -> Thank you. See reply to Amorel above.

agree  Tony M: I very much like your "Watch where I go and follow me!" --- and yes, the exclamation mark for the imperative here
47 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Laurens Landkroon
58 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou: Hi Jack. I agree with your comment on the exclamation mark, too!
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Robert Donahue: I agree with your answer and additional comments too.
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Nick Lingris: I also prefer "Watch where I go / where I'm going" because, if they keep their eyes on the raven, they'll probably start falling against things :-}
3 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Balasubramaniam L.
3 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Can Altinbay
5 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
8 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
8 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
23 hrs
  -> Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
follow my lead


Explanation:
...is a bit more idiomatic, I think, though course is okay. I'd like just "follow me", but I can see that echoes the "me" in the phrase before a bit too much.

Clare Barnes
Sweden
Local time: 12:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jack Doughty: I think "follow my lead" means "Do what I do" or "Do what I indicate I want you to do" rather than literally to follow.
15 mins

neutral  Tony M: Have to agree with Jack on this one... "follow my lead" is more like "follow my example", and not "follow me where I lead you"
44 mins

agree  Robert Donahue: I think this is just fine Clare. I like Jack's take on this too, but I prefer this one.
2 hrs

agree  jennifer newsome
5 hrs

agree  RHELLER: I like it :-)
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

42 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
follow me


Explanation:
I'm not sure if it is necessary to say "keep your eyes on me" or even a rephrased version of these words. If you follow someone it goes without saying that you will be looking at them. It is of course possible that something special happened in the story which means that the boys should not look away from the Raven, but this was not indicated by the asker.

I think it would be sufficient to simply put it as: "All rigth, follow me."

Johan Venter
Czech Republic
Local time: 12:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Inasmuch as that is just so much weaker and less poetic; this is children's imaginations we're trying to fire here! :-)
16 mins
  -> True, but we don't know what came before and after this and what is the relevance of this sentence to the story. If it is no more than a request to follow I stick with my answer.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search