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a pair under the pole

English translation: a pair (of horses) under the pole

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:a pair under the pole
English translation:a pair (of horses) under the pole
Entered by: Scheherezade Suria Lopez
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11:41 Jul 25, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: a pair under the pole
England, XIXth century. The main character is surprised when she learns that her sister-in-low can drive.

"My curricle is just outside the gate"
"Did you drive yourself all this way?"
"I always do," she said on a laugh. "I'm frightfully outré, you know. And today I've a pair under the pole, matched grays bought just last week at Tattersall's. But I promise I shan't overturn us!"

Could she be talking about a new pair of boots/shoes?
Scheherezade Suria Lopez
Spain
Local time: 12:02
a pair (of horses) under the pole
Explanation:
Can't remember the correct terminology for the pole but this is definitely referring to a pair of (gray) horses, bought last week from Tattersall's.
I think the pole is the whip thingy that is used to 'drive' the horses (go/stop/faster, etc.) or it may be the pole-type harness that connects the horses to the buggy (curricle).

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Note added at 12 mins (2005-07-25 11:53:46 GMT)
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Aaahh, this will help.
See lots of images at
http://images.google.com.au/images?q=curricle&hl=en

You can see how \"poles\" are a vital part of the apparatus.
HTH :-)
Selected response from:

KathyT
Australia
Local time: 20:02
Grading comment
I'm so glad I have you, guys! Otherwise, look what mess I could've done!!!!
Thanks!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +16a pair (of horses) under the pole
KathyT


  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +16
a pair (of horses) under the pole


Explanation:
Can't remember the correct terminology for the pole but this is definitely referring to a pair of (gray) horses, bought last week from Tattersall's.
I think the pole is the whip thingy that is used to 'drive' the horses (go/stop/faster, etc.) or it may be the pole-type harness that connects the horses to the buggy (curricle).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2005-07-25 11:53:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Aaahh, this will help.
See lots of images at
http://images.google.com.au/images?q=curricle&hl=en

You can see how \"poles\" are a vital part of the apparatus.
HTH :-)

KathyT
Australia
Local time: 20:02
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
I'm so glad I have you, guys! Otherwise, look what mess I could've done!!!!
Thanks!!!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johan Venter: Tattersall's: horse auction mart, founded in London by Richard Tattersall (1724-95). The first premises occupied were near Hyde Park Corner, then in the outskirts of London
1 min
  -> Thanks, venter :-)

agree  David Copeland
4 mins
  -> Thanks, David :-)

agree  Tony M: The 'pole' is part of the harness used to hitch the 2 horses to the buggy.
5 mins
  -> Thanks, Dusty :-) Yes, this is clear from the linked images.

agree  George Rabel: that's that I thought also, but I did not dare suggest it
6 mins
  -> Why not? Thanks, George :-)

agree  Balaban Cerit
8 mins
  -> Thanks, Balaban :-)

agree  Ken Cox: Oxford dico definition of curricle: 'a light, open, two-wheeled carriage pulled by two horses side by side.'
10 mins
  -> Thank you for the extra info, Kenneth :-)

agree  Nick Lingris: And I believe the pole is the wooden shaft that is attached to the yokes of the horses.
20 mins
  -> Thank you for the additional info, Nick :-)

agree  Kirill Semenov
22 mins
  -> Thanks, Kirill :-)

agree  RHELLER
22 mins
  -> Thanks, Rita :-)

agree  Armorel Young
23 mins
  -> Thanks, Armorel :-)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
28 mins
  -> Thanks, Vicky :-)

agree  jennifer newsome
51 mins
  -> Thanks, Jennifer :-)

agree  Laurel Porter: More extra info: They can be pulled either 2 horses or 3, in troika formation. http://www.guildofmodelwheelwrights.org/newsite03/vehicles/p...
1 hr
  -> Wow! Thanks, Laurel :-)

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Saleh :-)

agree  jccantrell
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, jc :-)

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
6 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marju :-)
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