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Nosferatu

English translation: see below

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09:54 Sep 7, 2000
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: Nosferatu
This is a name. Is it from someone in History? What does it mean and where does it come from. I'm not sure if it's Turkish
Missy Grimes
English translation:see below
Explanation:
Nosferatu = vampire.
The word "nosferatu," however, might not actually be a Slavic word. In fact, it might not be a real word at all. David J. Skal, a modern researcher of vampires, believes that the word "nosferatu" was a mistake or alteration of the Romanian word nesuferit, which comes from ancient Latin and means "not to suffer," or could imply "insufferable" or "intolerable" -- all words descriptive of a vampire's offensive personality. It is argued that Bram Stoker first discovered the word "nosferatu" while doing research for his book Dracula. He apparently read an 1885 writing called Transylvanian Superstitions by Emily de Laszowska Gerard, wherein she used the term "nosferatu" in place of "nesuferit." It is also possible that "nosferatu" could have been a slang term or variant for "nesuferit."

Whatever the case, today "nosferatu" means vampire largely because of director F.W. Murnau's 1922 German film which bears the name.

Still another interpretation of the word "nosferatu," from author Manuela Dunn-Mascetti, implies the word could be related to the Romanian term meaning "unclean one" -- necuratul. The people of Transylvania (which, by the way, is a real place in the Carpathian Mountains of Romania) have long held a belief in the so-called nosferatu (or vampire) -- a term which has demonic connotations as well.

Selected response from:

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 14:26
Grading comment
This was everything I was looking forward. I appreciate the help after searching everywhere for this name. Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1This is not a name in Turkishxxxallingus
na +1NosferatuJesús Paredes
naNosferatuahmet
nasee below
Laura Gentili


  

Answers


49 mins peer agreement (net): +1
This is not a name in Turkish


Explanation:
Sounds like a Greek name in Ancient Anatolian history but I 've never heard of it before. Maybe you should ask this to Geek-ENG or Spanish-ENG


    allingus
xxxallingus
Local time: 16:26

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  shenay kharatekin
927 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr peer agreement (net): +1
Nosferatu


Explanation:
It's the name of a film directed by F. W. Marnau based on Dracula. Please, see related website.


    Reference: http://www.silentera.com/VHS/nosferatuVHS.html
Jesús Paredes
Local time: 09:26

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  shenay kharatekin
927 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
see below


Explanation:
Nosferatu = vampire.
The word "nosferatu," however, might not actually be a Slavic word. In fact, it might not be a real word at all. David J. Skal, a modern researcher of vampires, believes that the word "nosferatu" was a mistake or alteration of the Romanian word nesuferit, which comes from ancient Latin and means "not to suffer," or could imply "insufferable" or "intolerable" -- all words descriptive of a vampire's offensive personality. It is argued that Bram Stoker first discovered the word "nosferatu" while doing research for his book Dracula. He apparently read an 1885 writing called Transylvanian Superstitions by Emily de Laszowska Gerard, wherein she used the term "nosferatu" in place of "nesuferit." It is also possible that "nosferatu" could have been a slang term or variant for "nesuferit."

Whatever the case, today "nosferatu" means vampire largely because of director F.W. Murnau's 1922 German film which bears the name.

Still another interpretation of the word "nosferatu," from author Manuela Dunn-Mascetti, implies the word could be related to the Romanian term meaning "unclean one" -- necuratul. The people of Transylvania (which, by the way, is a real place in the Carpathian Mountains of Romania) have long held a belief in the so-called nosferatu (or vampire) -- a term which has demonic connotations as well.



Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 14:26
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
This was everything I was looking forward. I appreciate the help after searching everywhere for this name. Thank you.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 hrs
Nosferatu


Explanation:
Nosferatu is the name of the vampire character in Stam Broker's Dracula. Do you remember Klaus Kinski in that movie?
His performance was brilliant as Nosferatu.

ahmet
Local time: 16:26
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Changes made by editors
Feb 25, 2007 - Changes made by Özden Arıkan:
Term askednosferatu » Nosferatu
Language pairTurkish to English » English
FieldOther » Art/Literary
Field (specific)(none) » Poetry & Literature


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