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polo-neck part

English translation: See explanation below...

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18:17 Dec 27, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: polo-neck part
"The moment has come to cast light on those patches from my past that I would prefer to leave in the dark of forgetfulness. It is I began my career, not in a polo-neck part in some uncompromisingly avant-garde production in a basement twenty-seater, but on the amateur stage, in a community hall in my hometown, before an audience of gaping provincials."

This guy is an actor, and british. It seems to me a metaphorical expression, but of what?
dalg?c
Local time: 09:20
English translation:See explanation below...
Explanation:
As Marion has suggested, the type of rôle of a character stereotypically wearing a 'polo-neck' is what is being implied here; the only things is, the implication is going to be quite different depending on the cultural context!

I don't think it's quite so much 'metaphor' as stereotyping, a short-hand way of summing up a general type.

What period was this actor's career starting in? And in what country --- I see you say he is British?

I would disagree with MG inasmuch as I don't think 'polo-neck' refers to a polo shirt (even in AE?) --- certainly, in the UK, it would be refrring to a polo-neck sweater, quite a different garment, and with quite a different connotation. As an example, if this was back in the 70s, say, the reference to polo-neck might suggest a do-gooding left-wing intellectual (though others may be able to shed greater insight than I on that particular aspect) --- but certainly from the UK perspective, I wouldn't say particularly 'preppie' (a very US concept...)

Whatever, the point is that the combined historical and/or geographical background is going to be vital in interpreting this one...

Clearly, the type of character being portrayed was such as to make the provincial audience gape.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 48 mins (2005-12-27 23:05:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, Kay has highlighted one point that escaped me: that little 'not' which makes all the difference. He did NOt start his career in some terrible worthy, intellectual, avant-garde production where people wore polo-neck swetaers and it was all about the words, and the pauses between them, and not about staging... You know, "if it's going to do you good it has to hurt" stuff.

No, he comes from the good old traditional "what you see is what you get" amateur dramatic stage; you have to have British Am Dram in your blodd as I have to realize just how awful this is, and hence why he would be so ashamed of it that up till now he has preferred to keep it in the dark...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 50 mins (2005-12-27 23:07:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, my typos are in the true spirit of "it'll be alright on the night" that pervades British Am Dram, but to avoid any confusion, I would just like to correct (at least!):

NOT
sweater
and of course:
blood

Sorry, but these tiny fonts are so hard to read on my screen...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:20
Grading comment
thanx
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +8See explanation below...
Tony M
4casual dress - not a costume
Kay Patterson
4a part of some hip, artsy, into to the latest trends characterAlexander Demyanov
4some preppie role
Marian Greenfield
1intellectual role
Derek Gill Franßen


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
some preppie role


Explanation:
polo shirts are the quintessential trademark of a preppie.

Marian Greenfield
Local time: 02:20
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I'm not quite sure if the terms are the same in the UK and US, but a polo-neck (sweater) is not at all the same as a polo shirt...
2 mins
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
intellectual role


Explanation:
I'm not completely sure, but for some reason I get the feeling of "Dead Poet's Society" when I read this, i.e. some (psuedo-)intellectual, heavy and poetic roles. It makes me think of those (basically preppy) college guys - the ones with the sweater draped around their necks and talking about deep subjects.

Anybody remember "Deep Thoughts" by Jack Handy?

But then again, I may be completely off on this one. :-)

Derek Gill Franßen
Germany
Local time: 08:20
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 20
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37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
a part of some hip, artsy, into to the latest trends character


Explanation:
http://www.cavern-liverpool.co.uk/reviews/kingsdock_review.h...

Alexander Demyanov
Local time: 02:20
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 38
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47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
casual dress - not a costume


Explanation:
i think the clue is in "avant-garde." Instead of traditional play with customs and fancy sets, this is a kind of experimental play, with characters dressed in ordinary clothes (polo shirt) and performing in space which is not traditionally used for performances in front of an audience of sophisticated intellectuals, in a big city. But the character was not one of these avant-garde "types" - rather he began his acting career in a traditional role & setting -- a community hall, small town, friends and relatives in the audience --
Now, when he looks back on this time, he is a bit ashamed -- it wasn't a very daring way to start a serious acting career.

Kay Patterson
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Brie Vernier: But "polo neck" (NOT "polo shirt") modifies *part* -- not what the actors were wearing, but the kind of role they played
1 hr

neutral  Tony M: I'm with Brie on this one
3 hrs
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +8
See explanation below...


Explanation:
As Marion has suggested, the type of rôle of a character stereotypically wearing a 'polo-neck' is what is being implied here; the only things is, the implication is going to be quite different depending on the cultural context!

I don't think it's quite so much 'metaphor' as stereotyping, a short-hand way of summing up a general type.

What period was this actor's career starting in? And in what country --- I see you say he is British?

I would disagree with MG inasmuch as I don't think 'polo-neck' refers to a polo shirt (even in AE?) --- certainly, in the UK, it would be refrring to a polo-neck sweater, quite a different garment, and with quite a different connotation. As an example, if this was back in the 70s, say, the reference to polo-neck might suggest a do-gooding left-wing intellectual (though others may be able to shed greater insight than I on that particular aspect) --- but certainly from the UK perspective, I wouldn't say particularly 'preppie' (a very US concept...)

Whatever, the point is that the combined historical and/or geographical background is going to be vital in interpreting this one...

Clearly, the type of character being portrayed was such as to make the provincial audience gape.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 48 mins (2005-12-27 23:05:48 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, Kay has highlighted one point that escaped me: that little 'not' which makes all the difference. He did NOt start his career in some terrible worthy, intellectual, avant-garde production where people wore polo-neck swetaers and it was all about the words, and the pauses between them, and not about staging... You know, "if it's going to do you good it has to hurt" stuff.

No, he comes from the good old traditional "what you see is what you get" amateur dramatic stage; you have to have British Am Dram in your blodd as I have to realize just how awful this is, and hence why he would be so ashamed of it that up till now he has preferred to keep it in the dark...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 50 mins (2005-12-27 23:07:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Well, my typos are in the true spirit of "it'll be alright on the night" that pervades British Am Dram, but to avoid any confusion, I would just like to correct (at least!):

NOT
sweater
and of course:
blood

Sorry, but these tiny fonts are so hard to read on my screen...

Tony M
France
Local time: 08:20
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 252
Grading comment
thanx

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Derek Gill Franßen: I agree that the author is stereotyping (not using a metaphor). Do you happen to know how the British from the province would view someone with a "polo-neck?" I don't (I'm American). ;-)
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Derek! No, I'm not at all sure, and I think it also depends very much on the PERIOD...

agree  Sara Noss: Yes, I think the image we are supposed to get is of an obscure, pretentious piece of theatre.
41 mins
  -> Thanks, Babagaya! I think you've got it in a nutshell

agree  Jack Doughty
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Jack!

agree  Brie Vernier
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Brie!

agree  juvera: "...you may be clad in the 'French intellectual philosopher leftie' staple of a polo neck jumper noir." - or writer, player, audience of some avant-garde theatre of the same ilk.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Juvera! Nice quote!

agree  Dave Calderhead: Harold Pinter in polo necks, characters in 'Look back in anger' in polo necks wearing duffle coats in film version with Burton, back in 1958. Royal Court /avant-garde off-Broadway type theatre.//C'mon Dusty - boldly go into that...2006 (;-{)>
4 hrs
  -> Spot on, Dave! As a matter of fact, Pinter was exactly what sprang to my mind, but I was afraid to say it in case I got my head bitten off!

agree  Cristina Chaplin
15 hrs
  -> Thanks, Awana!

agree  Rusinterp
1 day8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alexandra!
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