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bet the house on Overlord

English translation: bet the house, bet the farm

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:bet the house on Overlord
English translation:bet the house, bet the farm
Entered by: Bianca Fogarasi
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17:06 Sep 1, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / World War 2
English term or phrase: bet the house on Overlord
"Failure would have brought immediate political as well as military problems. I would guess that the Churchill government could not have survived - after all, **it had bet the kingdom on Overlord.**
[...]
In the United States, meanwhile, Roosevelt - **who had also bet the house on Overlord** - would have been secure from a no-confidence vote. "

I've got a dilema: could it be that "house" here is misprinted and in fact it should be the House as in White House? (I've got quite many misprints in the book I'm translating..) Churchill bets (metaphorically speaking) the kingdom, Rooselvet the White House that operation Overlord will be successful? Or is it quite ok as it is and, in such case, what's this expression supposed to mean? "bet one's most valuable possession (generally a house)"?

Many thanks in advance!
Bianca Fogarasi
bet the house, bet the farm
Explanation:
This is a saying in the USA, and has nothing to do with the White House.

It means that, had the venture failed, there would have been nothing to fall back on, everything would have been spent on this one effort.

More than just the most valuable possession, rather ALL one's possessions.

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Note added at 8 mins (2006-09-01 17:15:51 GMT)
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And it is understandable the way it stands, but I am more familiar with "bet the farm."
Selected response from:

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 01:59
Grading comment
Many thanks, now it's clear! ;)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +7bet the house, bet the farm
jccantrell
5 +1bet everything on the Overlord campaign
R-i-c-h-a-r-d
4wager everything you have on a successful outcome.Will Matter


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
bet the house on overlord
bet the house, bet the farm


Explanation:
This is a saying in the USA, and has nothing to do with the White House.

It means that, had the venture failed, there would have been nothing to fall back on, everything would have been spent on this one effort.

More than just the most valuable possession, rather ALL one's possessions.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2006-09-01 17:15:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And it is understandable the way it stands, but I am more familiar with "bet the farm."

jccantrell
United States
Local time: 01:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
Many thanks, now it's clear! ;)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anton Baer: true -- with slight possibility of an (involuntary?) pun on House of Representatives. I.e., R. could lose the vote.
2 mins
  -> FDR could have shot his wife on national television (if it had been invented) and he STILL would have been re-elected.

agree  Peter Shortall: If you substituted "White House", it would be illogical - "Roosevelt... had also bet the White House" implies Churchill had bet the White House too. Only this makes sense ("bet the house" means the same as "bet the kingdom" - so "also" makes sense)
5 mins

agree  Dave Calderhead
15 mins

agree  Michael Barnett: It is an idiomatic expression meaning to bet everything. It connotes losing one's home in a wager.
20 mins

agree  Jack Doughty
1 hr

agree  Joe L: Yes, forget about the White "House" or "House" of Representatives. That's just semantic coincidence.
1 hr

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
13 hrs
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
bet the house on overlord
wager everything you have on a successful outcome.


Explanation:
"Bet the house" essentially means that you bet everything that you have on a successful outcome. You take the (huge) risk that your plans will be successful; if you win, you win big if you lose you lose everything that you have. In this case, Churchill "bet the kingdom", Roosevelt bet the "White House" and the real meaning is that the entire outcome of WWII was riding on the success of "Operation Overlord". HTH.

Will Matter
United States
Local time: 01:59
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 64
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
bet the house on overlord
bet everything on the Overlord campaign


Explanation:
Meaning that, during WW2, and OPERATION OVERLORD, it was a huge risk to bet the 'house', bet 'everything'; that if it went wrong it would have had disastrous effects on the outcome of World War 2. They therefore had to bet everything on the result.

I hope that explains things a little better:) Richard.

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Note added at 13 mins (2006-09-01 17:20:18 GMT)
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I think my explanation may have been posted about 0.5 seconds after willmatter! Not plagiarized from his explanation.

R-i-c-h-a-r-d
Brazil
Local time: 05:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexander Demyanov
3 mins
  -> thanks, Alexander
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