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cabbages

English translation: no hidden meaning

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08:07 Nov 29, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / The Walrus and The Carpenter by Lewis Carroll
English term or phrase: cabbages
What is implied by "cabbages"? Just the respective vegetable? Or maybe there is some hidden meaning?

=========
The Walrus and The Carpenter by Lewis Carroll

"The time has come," the Walrus said,
"To talk of many things:
Of shoes--and ships--and sealing-wax--
Of *cabbages*--and kings--
And why the sea is boiling hot--
And whether pigs have wings."
Alexander Onishko
Local time: 13:19
English translation:no hidden meaning
Explanation:
Seems like a random object in a series of random objects "to talk of."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 days10 hrs (2008-12-01 18:53:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Alexander, I looked at your other question, but I'm not familiar with Angela's references. They appear to have considerable merit, however.
Selected response from:

Mark Berelekhis
United States
Local time: 06:19
Grading comment
Thank you very much, Mark and all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +13no hidden meaning
Mark Berelekhis
Summary of reference entries provided
Googling yields (among others)...
Suzan Hamer

Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +13
no hidden meaning


Explanation:
Seems like a random object in a series of random objects "to talk of."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 days10 hrs (2008-12-01 18:53:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Alexander, I looked at your other question, but I'm not familiar with Angela's references. They appear to have considerable merit, however.

Mark Berelekhis
United States
Local time: 06:19
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 206
Grading comment
Thank you very much, Mark and all!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Mark, would you be so kind as to share your opinion also on this question - http://www.proz.com/kudoz/english_to_russian/poetry_literature/2959826


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: AFAIK, Carroll was just trying to find the most ludicrously disparate objects he could --- paying attention to alliteration and scansion, of course!
2 mins
  -> I would agree. Thank you, Tony.

agree  orientalhorizon
9 mins
  -> Thank you, oriental.

agree  William [Bill] Gray: And with Tony!
45 mins
  -> Thank you, William.

agree  Carol Gullidge: yes, this is simply a "nonsense rhyme"
53 mins
  -> Thank you, Carol.

agree  Jack Doughty
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Jack.

agree  airmailrpl: just the vegetable
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, air.

agree  Suzan Hamer: and with Tony M. I would think too "cabbages" might represent one extreme of a continuum with "kings" at the other end; an opposite to "kings," being perhaps one of the most common, "lowly" vegetables around, a poor person's food.
3 hrs
  -> Thank you, Suzan, an interesting thought.

agree  Patricia Townshend: And of course there is the alliteration of cabbages and kings.
9 hrs
  -> Yep, as with ships and shoes and sealing wax. Thank you, Patricia.

agree  Rachel Fell
12 hrs
  -> Thank you, Rachel.

agree  JaneTranslates: Yes, and with Tony M, Suzan, and Patricia.
13 hrs
  -> Thank you, Jane.

agree  Phong Le
2 days2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Phong.

agree  Alice Bootman: Yes, absolutely - point of view of someone who studied literature. Good luck!
2 days10 hrs
  -> Thank you, Alice :)

agree  shirin ghorab
13 days
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Reference comments


3 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
Reference: Googling yields (among others)...

Reference information:
http://www.cs.rice.edu/~ssiyer/minstrels/poems/347.html, which
discusses this as a nonsense poem and comments that parts of the poem are "dazzling in their simplicity and sheer meaninglessness. And the
whole poem is written in the same vein - simple, matter-of-fact, and
utterly bizarre."

http://baheyeldin.com/literature/symbolism-lewis-carroll-wal...
"Symbolism in Lewis Carroll's 'The Walrus and the Carpenter"

Suzan Hamer
Netherlands
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 56

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Gunilla Zedigh: I agree with Suzan's comment above -- cabbage is the food of peasants, and so the direct opposite of what kings eat.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Gunilla.
agree  sueaberwoman: Good reading, that first link! (It works if you get rid of the comma at the end.)
2 days9 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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Changes made by editors
Jul 29, 2009 - Changes made by Mark Berelekhis:
FieldOther » Art/Literary


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