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sazifryer

English translation: nonsense word

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19:34 Feb 8, 2012
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / A novel by Philip Dick about the 1950s
English term or phrase: sazifryer
An elderly lady appeared in the doorway, carrying a fat cloth shopping bag. “Are you the radio repair man?” she said to Pete. “I have a radio here I want to get fixed.” She began to unfasten the shopping bag. “It just went dead. It’s worked fine for thirteen years; I don’t understand why it should go dead. Maybe it’s a broken wire.”
Or a worn-out ***sazifryer***, Roger thought to himself.

(Roger is the owner of the radio store).
Alexander Alexandrov
Russian Federation
Local time: 21:57
English translation:nonsense word
Explanation:
The old lady doesn't know anything about how radio's work, hence her silly "maybe a broken wire." Roger makes up a word that is to his mind as a silly as the comment of the old lady.

That's what I think is happening here. Sazifryer doesn't seem to rhyme with anything or signify anything I can think of.



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Note added at 1 hr (2012-02-08 20:53:51 GMT)
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I guess you hear the rhyme and meter if you hear saz-a-fryer and sez-a-wire
Selected response from:

Stephanie Ezrol
United States
Local time: 14:57
Grading comment
Thank you, Stephanie! Maybe, juvera's suggestion is also true.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +6nonsense word
Stephanie Ezrol
4 +2freakfryer, monsterfryer, mutantfryer, etc.juvera
5thingamajig (a useless or a not easily identifiable thing)Audra deFalco


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
nonsense word


Explanation:
The old lady doesn't know anything about how radio's work, hence her silly "maybe a broken wire." Roger makes up a word that is to his mind as a silly as the comment of the old lady.

That's what I think is happening here. Sazifryer doesn't seem to rhyme with anything or signify anything I can think of.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2012-02-08 20:53:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I guess you hear the rhyme and meter if you hear saz-a-fryer and sez-a-wire

Stephanie Ezrol
United States
Local time: 14:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 156
Grading comment
Thank you, Stephanie! Maybe, juvera's suggestion is also true.
Notes to answerer
Asker: It seems you are right. By the way, it rhymes with 'wire'


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: Must be; I can't think of an alternative either
25 mins
  -> Thanks Charles !

agree  Jenni Lukac
52 mins
  -> Thanks Jenni !

agree  xxxtrsk2000
2 hrs
  -> Thanks !

agree  BdiL: Maurizio
18 hrs
  -> Thanks !

agree  missdutch
18 hrs
  -> Thanks !

agree  jccantrell: No, it's a burned out whatchamacallit! or maybe a thingamajig....
1 day5 hrs
  -> Thanks !
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
freakfryer, monsterfryer, mutantfryer, etc.


Explanation:
Philip Dick must be familiar with contemporary fiction, and I think he is pulling legs here by making up this splendid word for a useless contraption. I think he is referring to the Sazi, fictional shapeshifters, the subject of a supposedly popular series of fiction.

The elderly lady must have made some kind of impression (a witch?) on Roger and he is reacting to her and her old equipment in this jokey manner. And for Philip Dick it was a good opportunity to create a funny word and needle his fellow fantasy fiction writers, the authors of the Sazi.

Tales of the Sazi
Series by C.T.Adams and Cathy Clamp
Mob hitman Tony Giodone was bitten by one of his targets . . . now he becomes a wolf every time there’s a full moon. As Tony starts to figure out just what’s happening to him, he discovers a hidden, worldwide shapeshifter community, complete with its own rules, its own leadership, and its own enforcers.
But though Tony’s a brand-new wolf, he’s no stranger to battles for dominance or to violence, and he’s just met his destined mate, Sue Quentin. Together, Tony and Sue earn a place for themselves in the Sazi community—and just in time, as old enmities and power struggles threaten to expose the shapeshifters to the world. Tony was never supposed to become a Wolf, but he’s the only one who can save the Sazi....
Eric Thompson’s wolf howl can ruin electronics and send aircraft tumbling from the sky. Considered dangerous even by his fellow Sazi, Eric has become a lone...
http://us.macmillan.com/series/TalesoftheSazi
There are plenty of other references to the books on the internet.

You could make up a similar word with similar connotations in Russian for your translation.

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Note added at 17 hrs (2012-02-09 13:33:03 GMT)
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Alas, I should have written: P.D. must have been....
Checking the dates, it could have been the other way around: wondering about the word in Dick's novel, like you do, the authors used it to name their fantasy society of weirdos.

juvera
Local time: 19:57
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian
PRO pts in category: 39

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  BdiL: Good help! Maurizio
54 mins

agree  missdutch
1 hr
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2 days19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
thingamajig (a useless or a not easily identifiable thing)


Explanation:
I think we also say thingamajig in English for something like this. It's the standard, go-to nonsensical word.

Audra deFalco
United States
Local time: 14:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (2): missdutch, BdiL


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