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There is no more steely barb than that of the Infinite.

English translation: here's an interpretation

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11:58 Apr 7, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: There is no more steely barb than that of the Infinite.
A famous saying from Charles Baudelaire

Would anyone pls explain it in plain English?
xxxidler
English translation:here's an interpretation
Explanation:
a steely barb is a component of "barbed wire" the part which you get caught on, or in Baudelaire's time presumably just the natural equivalent on plants.
At the risk of banalising the great man's ideas, when things are ephemeral, we can make mistakes and everyone will forget them, but when we are talking about the Infinite (in terms of time here), our mistakes are engraved in stone.

Alternatively, the Infinite is so fascinating that we (or poets) are captivated by it and cannot break free.

The connection with the content of the e-mail is rather loosed, to say the least!

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Note added at 2004-04-07 12:13:21 (GMT)
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typo: that should be \"loose\" of course

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Note added at 2004-04-07 12:39:46 (GMT)
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It\'s actually a great pleasure to be able to interpret some literary texts every now and then, instead of working on hydraulics and cardiology (suprisingly similar topics!)
Selected response from:

Anthony Green
Italy
Local time: 13:38
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +8here's an interpretation
Anthony Green


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +8
here's an interpretation


Explanation:
a steely barb is a component of "barbed wire" the part which you get caught on, or in Baudelaire's time presumably just the natural equivalent on plants.
At the risk of banalising the great man's ideas, when things are ephemeral, we can make mistakes and everyone will forget them, but when we are talking about the Infinite (in terms of time here), our mistakes are engraved in stone.

Alternatively, the Infinite is so fascinating that we (or poets) are captivated by it and cannot break free.

The connection with the content of the e-mail is rather loosed, to say the least!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-04-07 12:13:21 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

typo: that should be \"loose\" of course

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-04-07 12:39:46 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It\'s actually a great pleasure to be able to interpret some literary texts every now and then, instead of working on hydraulics and cardiology (suprisingly similar topics!)

Anthony Green
Italy
Local time: 13:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DGK T-I: arrows & spears(still in our poetic imagination)can also have steel barbs(&fish hooks)~For asker:Barbs are hooked so that they cannot be removed once the arrow has wounded you,or not without terrible injury.If you try to pull out,worse pain/injury caused
15 mins
  -> Yes, thanks, Giuli, I hadn't thought of those barbs

agree  Hacene
20 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
25 mins

agree  Penelope Ausejo
1 hr

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
1 hr

agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver: Of course, the Infinite (with a capital) will get hold of you forever...
3 hrs

agree  BerylA: A late response but I agree with the explanations! Steely, of course gives the impression of something very cold and hard!
8 hrs

agree  chica nueva: but it is an old text, and I think 'steely' may mean 'strong''durable' here (as well as possibly cold/hard/unyielding...)
1 day18 hrs
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