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coachee

English translation: Yes ~ unrecognized officially, but evidently it is used that way

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02:06 Aug 30, 2008
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Psychology / Coaching
English term or phrase: coachee
The only definition I've found in a reliable dictionary is "a coachman." However, in my text, it is used to stand for "the client of a life coach." Is it possible to use "coachee" for the person being coached?
Cagdas Karatas
Turkey
Local time: 07:23
English translation:Yes ~ unrecognized officially, but evidently it is used that way
Explanation:

Evidently it is used as a 'skills coaching' term . . . even though it is not recognized as a real word in a dictionary yet . . . that I could find!

Header: "Building Coachee's Problem-Solving Skills in 10 Minutes"

see refs below

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Note added at 11 mins (2008-08-30 02:18:13 GMT)
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Sorry - yes, it would mean the person being coached!
Selected response from:

Demi Ebrite
United States
Local time: 23:23
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Yes ~ unrecognized officially, but evidently it is used that way
Demi Ebrite
5coachee
JaneTranslates


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Yes ~ unrecognized officially, but evidently it is used that way


Explanation:

Evidently it is used as a 'skills coaching' term . . . even though it is not recognized as a real word in a dictionary yet . . . that I could find!

Header: "Building Coachee's Problem-Solving Skills in 10 Minutes"

see refs below

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2008-08-30 02:18:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry - yes, it would mean the person being coached!


    Reference: http://ezinearticles.com/?Understanding-How-The-Coachee-Feel...
    Reference: http://www.1000ventures.com/business_guide/crosscuttings/coa...
Demi Ebrite
United States
Local time: 23:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mihaela Ghiuzeli: as in "interviewee", addressee", employee"(the action is taken upon...'"
8 mins
  -> Thank you, Mihaela

agree  Sabine Akabayov, PhD
25 mins
  -> Thank you, sibsab

agree  Gary D: coachee, bubbee, dadee, kissee, all relate to Baby talk, (bubbee pooee the nappie)
2 days1 hr
  -> Thank you, Garyee : )
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
coachee


Explanation:
Yes, it's possible, but rather cutesy (cutesee?) It's a popular neologism gimmick these days to add "ee" to a verb to mean the person receiving the action of the verb. It's not formal English by any means, but by analogy (employer/employee), it's possible.

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Note added at 35 mins (2008-08-30 02:42:46 GMT)
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Two apologies: First, I intended to hit "high" instead of "highest" confidence. I seldom, if ever, rate my answer a 5! Second, Mihaela's comment with the "employee" example was posted while I was typing (I'm slow). I would withdraw my example if that were possible.

JaneTranslates
Puerto Rico
Local time: 00:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Demi Ebrite: Jane, I think your answer offers a valid point ~ the 'ee' endings are cutesy, and sound (to me) unprofessional, but then, who here isn't a 'word snob'?? : ) PS - of course not, I was referring to ME! Perfectionist!!ROLF
20 mins
  -> Oooops, is my elitism showing??? Yes, this is one of my pet peeves, not the least because the -ee suffix is ambiguous (see "consultee" discussion elsewhere). Thanks for your comment!//Ha! As you say, "Who here isn't a 'word snob'??" :-D
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