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rambling

English translation: (literally) walking slowly, for pleasure

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:rambling
English translation:(literally) walking slowly, for pleasure
Entered by: Tony M
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22:53 Dec 13, 2010
English to English translations [PRO]
Slang / Colloquialisms
English term or phrase: rambling
Brazilian En-Portuguese slang glossary listed "rambling" colloquially as an adv. meaning "quickly", "at top speed", and used this example: "We went rambling down the road to the old farm." Is that legit at all? No dictionary other than the one I stumbled upon the case in bears out the alleged usage.
FNO
See explanation below
Explanation:
No, i'd say it isn't legit.

For a start, surely this isn't being used as an adverb in the example given? 'to go rambling' usually means 'to go for a hike in the country' — unless qualified with some other form of transport, one would usually assume walking, and hence, at a walking pace — i.e. slowly, rather than quickly!

I can understand someone saying it of a vehicular journey, meaning that the vehcile was just toddling gently along.

Cf. 'ambling', which also means slowly; and also, a 'rambling story / book / conversation / speech' — one that goes on and on and doesn't get to the point very quickly.

So although I'm by no means an exhaustive authority on the EN language, I can't help thinking your source must be wrong; and as I can't think of any simialr EN word with which it might have been confused, the only thing I can think of is that some confusion must have occurrd on the PT side of things.

Do note, however, that if this is really slang, then perhaps it is a modern usage with which I (an old fart!) am simply unfamiliar: lots of modern slang says the opposite of what it appears to mean, so something that is 'wicked' is actually 'really good'...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 02:51
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5See explanation below
Tony M
3 +2perhaps in Googleland
Allison Wright
4 +1walking down the road at a leisurely pace
David Hollywood
4a pleasant walk
Alexandra Taggart
Summary of reference entries provided
the urban dictionary tells all
British Diana

Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
See explanation below


Explanation:
No, i'd say it isn't legit.

For a start, surely this isn't being used as an adverb in the example given? 'to go rambling' usually means 'to go for a hike in the country' — unless qualified with some other form of transport, one would usually assume walking, and hence, at a walking pace — i.e. slowly, rather than quickly!

I can understand someone saying it of a vehicular journey, meaning that the vehcile was just toddling gently along.

Cf. 'ambling', which also means slowly; and also, a 'rambling story / book / conversation / speech' — one that goes on and on and doesn't get to the point very quickly.

So although I'm by no means an exhaustive authority on the EN language, I can't help thinking your source must be wrong; and as I can't think of any simialr EN word with which it might have been confused, the only thing I can think of is that some confusion must have occurrd on the PT side of things.

Do note, however, that if this is really slang, then perhaps it is a modern usage with which I (an old fart!) am simply unfamiliar: lots of modern slang says the opposite of what it appears to mean, so something that is 'wicked' is actually 'really good'...

Tony M
France
Local time: 02:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Travelin Ann: //Of course, a Mod will need to edit either answer for the glossary ;)
3 mins
  -> Thanks, Ann! / I think this is one of those instances where any glossary entry would be pretty meaningless anyway; and please note that both asker and answerer can edit the term at the time of glossing, so no moderator intervention is called for.

agree  Allison Wright: à propos your last para. TonyM: Did you know in certain Facebook circles a "rent" is not "rental" but a shortened form of "parent". So "no rents" is not an expression of poverty, but rather one of liberation. :)
13 mins
  -> Thanks, Allison! I feared as much.. and there was me thinking it just meant that they hadn't been torn... We get a lot of this over here in FR too, where they keep a different bit of the word from us in EN.

agree  Paula Vaz-Carreiro
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Paula!

agree  kmtext: It might have been confused with rattling along, but that's a guess at best, and, difficult as it is to keep up with UK-EN slang, it's almost impossible to be fully aware of usage in other countries.
10 hrs
  -> Thanks, KMT! Ah now there's a thought... anybody's guess, really ;-)

agree  B D Finch: Though your vehicle might have been tootling (moderately fast) rather than toddling (requires legs)? Mr Toad?
11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Barbara! Oh yes! And we lived on a boat, so I was enchanted by 'Wind in the Willows' "Toot, toot..." (with the original illustrations..)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
walking down the road at a leisurely pace


Explanation:
that's what I would say ...

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Note added at 2 hrs (2010-12-14 01:20:00 GMT)
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"rambling" = to walk about casually or for pleasure. ...
forget about defining it too closely ... it just means they had a leisurely walk down the rod to the farm

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Note added at 2 hrs (2010-12-14 01:20:32 GMT)
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road


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Note added at 2 hrs (2010-12-14 01:21:40 GMT)
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probably looking at the surroundings :) (as I would do) :)

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Note added at 2 hrs (2010-12-14 01:34:39 GMT)
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look at the flowers :)

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Note added at 2 hrs (2010-12-14 01:36:55 GMT)
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Whether you are a keen mountain walker, leisurely rambler or you enjoy moderately paced walks, whatever your age or ability, we have the perfect holiday for ...
www.ramblerscountrywide.co.uk/about_us.aspx - Cached - Similar

David Hollywood
Local time: 22:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  marybro: yes, used as a verb here...wandering down the road
10 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
perhaps in Googleland


Explanation:
The English verb structure is: infinitive "to go" + present participle.
e.g. we went wandering - which is what is meant in your context.

We go walking
I went skipping
You went running

Structure not unlike the present continuous tense with the verb "to be"
e.g. I am singing, she is dancing, he is thinking. they are sleeping, etc.

How "rapidamente" (Pt) turned into "rambling" (En), or vice versa, is beyond me. Only a computer could do that.

The adverbe of the verb "to ramble" is "ramblingly". (Eighth Edition, Concise Oxford Dictionary, 1990 - hardcover.

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Note added at 8 hrs (2010-12-14 07:36:19 GMT)
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typo: adverb

Allison Wright
Portugal
Local time: 01:51
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: "Allison in Googleland" — now there's a title for a book...
17 mins
  -> "Curiouser, and curiouser" she said, as she fell screaming down the well.

agree  Vera Costea
2 hrs
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2 days 17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
a pleasant walk


Explanation:
"To ramble" - in BE means to walk for pleasure ( in the countryside). Looking at the trees, picking flowers, casually strolling.

Alexandra Taggart
Russian Federation
Local time: 04:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in RussianRussian
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Reference comments


9 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: the urban dictionary tells all

Reference information:
Here is the usual definition for "rambling" but if you look at the adjacent (sexually explicit!!) entries you will find a larger variety.
Usually nothing to do with speediness and not an adverb either.
It's about as much an adverb as the way a German teacher supposedly taught his pupils how to negate using an "adverb" "I go notly".

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Note added at 13 hrs (2010-12-14 12:20:30 GMT)
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the Discussion entry about slang glossaries could be apllied to this:
Yes of course, beware anything that Web users are allowed to contribute to, especially (as it would appear here) if there are no kind of restrictions and no moderating...


    Reference: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Rambling%20ai...
British Diana
Germany
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  B D Finch: Made me laugh.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks!
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Changes made by editors
Dec 27, 2010 - Changes made by Tony M:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term
Dec 13, 2010 - Changes made by Tony M:
Term askedRambling: informal meaning as an adverb? » rambling


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