pisser, urinator

English translation: wee-weer

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:pisser, urinator
Selected answer:wee-weer
Entered by: Luiza Modesto

20:35 Feb 10, 2013
English language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Slang
English term or phrase: pisser, urinator
Is there a teasing term for a child who always needs to pee? Thanks.
Luiza Modesto
Brazil
Local time: 13:10
wee-weer
Explanation:
:)

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Note added at 2 mins (2013-02-10 20:38:06 GMT)
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kiddie-speak for "urinate" is wee-wee" in English so I would go with "wee-weer"

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Note added at 3 mins (2013-02-10 20:39:31 GMT)
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now that's UK English so let's hear what the US English speakers have to say :)

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Note added at 5 mins (2013-02-10 20:41:15 GMT)
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the kiddie verb is "wee" but to go for a pee" (i.e urinate) would be "to do/go wee-wees"

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Note added at 7 mins (2013-02-10 20:43:32 GMT)
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and the use of "wee-weeR" is teasing (i.e. a kiddie who habitually needs to "wee")

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Note added at 38 mins (2013-02-10 21:14:19 GMT)
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prince/princess wee-wee

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Note added at 1 hr (2013-02-10 22:10:49 GMT)
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to soften it
Selected response from:

David Hollywood
Local time: 13:10
Grading comment
Interesting how there isn't a widely used term in English for this. Thanks very much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
5wee-weer
David Hollywood
3mr/miss wee-wee; wee-wee boy, wee-wee girl
katsy


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
mr/miss wee-wee; wee-wee boy, wee-wee girl


Explanation:
Another UK take on it. As far as I know there is no generally accepted term.
What I suggest is just what I personally would say to a baby or small child to tease...

katsy
Local time: 17:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  David Hollywood: is fine but have to be careful if directly addressing the nipper as could lead to problems later :)
2 mins
  -> absolutely: I (probably wrongly) decided not to add that this kind of talk could only be used for a tiny tot - could be very pejorative if, say, the child was of an age to be 'potty trained' and was having problems in that area
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1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
wee-weer


Explanation:
:)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 mins (2013-02-10 20:38:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

kiddie-speak for "urinate" is wee-wee" in English so I would go with "wee-weer"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 mins (2013-02-10 20:39:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

now that's UK English so let's hear what the US English speakers have to say :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2013-02-10 20:41:15 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

the kiddie verb is "wee" but to go for a pee" (i.e urinate) would be "to do/go wee-wees"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2013-02-10 20:43:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and the use of "wee-weeR" is teasing (i.e. a kiddie who habitually needs to "wee")

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2013-02-10 21:14:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

prince/princess wee-wee

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2013-02-10 22:10:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

to soften it

David Hollywood
Local time: 13:10
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Interesting how there isn't a widely used term in English for this. Thanks very much!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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