Sound of a chicken

English translation: cluck,crow,cheep,chuck,chirp,peep, Cockadoodledoo

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Sounds of The Chickens
English translation:cluck,crow,cheep,chuck,chirp,peep, Cockadoodledoo
Entered by: Lingo Pros

05:05 Apr 4, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Slang
English term or phrase: Sound of a chicken
What are the different nouns and verbs for the sound a chicken makes? Both slang (e.g.'cheep cheep') and literary English please.
Lingo Pros
United States
Local time: 03:01
"cluck cluck" & "clucking"
Explanation:
A chicken clucks. "Cheep cheep" is a songbird (or a chick?)

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Note added at 6 mins (2005-04-04 05:12:01 GMT)
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I wouldn\'t call this \"literary,\" but it isn\'t strict slang, either. I would use it for any chicken context :-) It\'s the only chicken word I can think of ... but then, I grew up in the city.

A rooster, of course, says COCKADOODLEDOO!
Selected response from:

Michael Schubert
United States
Local time: 00:01
Grading comment
Thanks to all! All answers are correct. The bourjois city grown early bird with biggest number of supporters catches the grades!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7"cluck cluck" & "clucking"
Michael Schubert
4 +4options
RHELLER
5 +3the hen clucks; the cock crows.
Jonathan Spector


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
sound of a chicken
"cluck cluck" & "clucking"


Explanation:
A chicken clucks. "Cheep cheep" is a songbird (or a chick?)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2005-04-04 05:12:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I wouldn\'t call this \"literary,\" but it isn\'t strict slang, either. I would use it for any chicken context :-) It\'s the only chicken word I can think of ... but then, I grew up in the city.

A rooster, of course, says COCKADOODLEDOO!

Michael Schubert
United States
Local time: 00:01
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks to all! All answers are correct. The bourjois city grown early bird with biggest number of supporters catches the grades!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Aimee: oh clucking! that's right
5 mins

agree  RHELLER: yes, hens cluck
12 mins

agree  Larissa Dinsley
23 mins

agree  Nick Somers (X): Good start to the week! Crow doesn't taste as nice as chicken, but it's all I deserve. I was misled by the asker's "cheep cheep".
29 mins

agree  Can Altinbay: Good ones. By the way, (asker) it's more "peep peep" than "cheep cheep".
9 hrs

agree  Cristina Santos
10 hrs

agree  DGK T-I: Hens & cockerels (cocks, US roosters) cluck (make the "short" chicken noises),especially hens laying eggs or to chicks,but not only -eg: the proud Chanticleer in a modern translation of Chaucer http://www.librarius.com/canttran/nunprst/nunprst391-420.htm
13 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
the hen clucks; the cock crows.


Explanation:
I would like more context: if I read that someone made the sound of a chicken, he might be acting like a coward.

Jonathan Spector
Israel
Local time: 10:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  RHELLER: absolutely! baby chickens are called chicks
12 mins
  -> Thanks; I wanted to make sure of his context more than anything else.

agree  Michael Schubert: Absolutely.
13 mins
  -> Thanks, from a former turkey farmer

agree  DGK T-I: Cockerels/cocks (US roosters) crow "COCKADOODLEDOO!" as Michael &Jonathan say. In Chaucer's time English hens & cocks "chuked/chucked" but it's much rarer for them to say that nowadays,perhaps because the other fowls tease them for sounding old fashioned
13 hrs
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
sound of a chicken
options


Explanation:
... The rest of Old MacDonald's chickens. Squawk! Squawk! The artist and his model, preparing for the judging. Danny the Absolut bottle swings by the judges ...
www.phdtop.com/GNI/GNI1997/bodypainting

. For instance, American roosters crow, "Cockadoodledoo,” but their Spanish counterparts chirp, "Quiquiriquirí"; American hearts thump, but Mexican hearts go ...
www.drsonna.org/tortsynopsis.html

Why do roosters crow in the morning? Roosters don't crow at dawn to be noisy or annoying. They're protecting their turf! Before chickens were domesticated, ...
www.ag.ohio-state.edu/~twig/animals/html/061597.html

Cock-A-Doodle Doo!: What Does It Sound Like to You? ... Onomatope. Onomatopoeia. Onomatopoeic onomatopoeical Onomatopoetic Onomatopy Onomomancy Onondaga ...
www.online-dictionary.biz/english/ vocabulary/reference/Onomatopoeia.asp

Michael is correct
hens cluck

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Note added at 1 hr 23 mins (2005-04-04 06:29:18 GMT)
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FYI - this is not slang - this is considered very proper English
- here is the definition of slang

slang. The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition. 2002
...slang Expressions that do not belong to standard written English. For example, flipping out is slang for losing one s mind or losing one s temper.

slang. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001
...slang, vernacular vocabulary not generally acceptable in formal usage. It is notable for its liveliness, humor, emphasis, brevity, novelty, and exaggeration.


RHELLER
United States
Local time: 01:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robert Donahue (X): "to crow"!!! that's it! that is the verb : )
6 mins
  -> bird talk :-))))

agree  Michael Schubert: Nothing fowl here; you're a regular barnyard scholar!
12 mins
  -> I was actually at the aviary yesterday! visiting my little friends :-)...and I must compliment you on your pun - very clever indeed!

agree  Can Altinbay: Good answer!
9 hrs
  -> thanks Can (you missed some of the fun last night!)

agree  DGK T-I: Impeccable English - English hens &cockerels used to say 'chuk/chuck' for the short sound,but they usually'cluck'now http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/pardon2.htm http://www.lancasterukonline.net/reviews/williamson_park/can...
14 hrs
  -> thanks Giuli :-)\
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