wood waste vs. waste wood

English translation: waste generated from wood processing / leftover wood pieces

23:23 Jan 29, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering / alternative fuel
English term or phrase: wood waste vs. waste wood
From timber industry.

Is there is any difference between those terms and if yes, what?



Tnx in advance.
Alexander Shchekotin (X)
Local time: 06:14
English translation:waste generated from wood processing / leftover wood pieces
Explanation:
My linguistic instincts tell me:

wood waste = waste generated from wood processing

waste wood = leftover wood pieces (to be discarded)

But, not being intimately familiar with the jargon of the wood industry, I may be wrong.

Hope this helps.

Todd
Selected response from:

Todd Field
United States
Local time: 21:14
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +9waste generated from wood processing / leftover wood pieces
Todd Field
4 +3amount of wood wasted vs. the wood that went to waste
Pike
4 +2Depends on perspective
Kim Metzger
4 +1Difference as described below
hookmv
4comments: timber production distinction=yes ; wood recycling industry distinction=yes/no
nyamuk
3alternative fuels industry - wood-waste is an 'alternative fuel' source ready for processing
chica nueva
4 -1...
Alex Zelkind (X)


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
...


Explanation:
Wood waste is probably debris
Waste wood is probably the wood which can not be used for anything, or only for one specific purpose

Alex Zelkind (X)
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 18

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Gareth McMillan: "Debris" is also wood which can not be used for anything- and if it can be used for a specific purpose, then it can hardly be waste, oder?
9 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +9
waste generated from wood processing / leftover wood pieces


Explanation:
My linguistic instincts tell me:

wood waste = waste generated from wood processing

waste wood = leftover wood pieces (to be discarded)

But, not being intimately familiar with the jargon of the wood industry, I may be wrong.

Hope this helps.

Todd

Todd Field
United States
Local time: 21:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 39

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Pike
3 mins

agree  Kim Metzger: That's how I see it too.
18 mins

agree  Tatiana Nero (X)
2 hrs

agree  Alexandra Tussing
5 hrs

agree  Tony M: Succinctly put, and the way I see it too
9 hrs

agree  vixen
9 hrs

agree  chica nueva
9 hrs

agree  David Moore: wood waste as in chippings, sawdust, shavings etc.; these can be compacted and burned, too....
13 hrs

agree  Ines Garcia Botana
22 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Difference as described below


Explanation:
"Wood waste" would be a bi-product, i.e. saw dust, bark etc. "Waste wood" would be off-cuts and similar from sawing or planing etc. These might be used further, maybe fuel and suchlike.

hookmv
Sweden
Local time: 05:14
Native speaker of: Swedish
PRO pts in pair: 35

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  chica nueva: by-product?
9 hrs
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
amount of wood wasted vs. the wood that went to waste


Explanation:
Wood waste denotes "the amount of wood being wasted", while waste wood means "wood that can no longer be used in the process".
eg. "wood waste has been significantly reduced and the remaining waste wood is now being sold to other plants"

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Note added at 11 mins (2004-01-29 23:35:18 GMT)
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frugalliving.about.com/library/penny/blpenny1a.htm

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Note added at 12 mins (2004-01-29 23:36:24 GMT)
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...noticed that the internet community is rather unimpressed by this distinction, though...;-)

Pike
Croatia
Local time: 05:14
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 56

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Brandis (X): could go, sounds logical, But in this industry there is almost never an end. Only when the cellulose fully decays that it is totally inaccessible to be reused.
11 mins
  -> thank you.

agree  Kim Metzger: Yes, that's the way I see it too.
17 mins
  -> thank you.

agree  Mario Marcolin
9 hrs
  -> thank you.

neutral  Tony M: Not so sure aboiut your first definition; I think we'd probably be more likely to say 'wastage' there.
9 hrs
  -> thank you.
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Depends on perspective


Explanation:
Speaking as a cabinetmaker for 20 years, I'd say a woodworker/processor is concerned with "waste wood" in the sense that he tries to plan a project so that as little wood is wasted, i.e. cutoffs, etc.
A sawmill operator also tries to avoid "waste wood", but he can sell "wood waste", the sawdust, chips, unusable cutoffs to factories that use "wood waste" to manufacture chipboard, for example.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 22:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Pike
39 mins

agree  Gareth McMillan: Absolutely right IMO. The point most people are missing here is that "wood-waste" is useful. Personal experience beats a Dico every time, eh Kim?
8 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
comments: timber production distinction=yes ; wood recycling industry distinction=yes/no


Explanation:
In the timber industry, that is growing harvesting in milling there is a distinction. The distinction being what many here have already described.

Wood that is removed in the production of dimensioned lumber is called wood waste.

Wood that is removed from dimensioned lumber when it is used by a contractor, cabinetmaker.... is called waste wood.


However, and this may a big however, you asked about the timber industry but used the field 'alternative fuel' The industry that consumes wood waste and waste wood does not always respect the difference between wood waste and waste wood. In this industry they consume both types of waste and have a tendency to use the terms interchangeably.

nyamuk
United States
Local time: 21:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 58
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
alternative fuels industry - wood-waste is an 'alternative fuel' source ready for processing


Explanation:
Just to explain that, in the alternative fuels industry, wood-waste such as sawdust can be considered a processable resource. eg 1 it can be combined with other materials and made into a fuel such as briquettes, or perhaps,2 in some industries, it can be used as an alternative fuel in 'co-generation' and re-introduced to the plant on-site as a fuel for the plant's own energy requirements.

Googling on 'wood-waste alternative fuels'and 'wood-waste co-generation' brings up some articles on this.

Waste wood - is pieces 'off-cuts' eg from a sawmill. They can be used as a fuel for domestic open-fires perhaps, but not generally for industrial use, as far as I know.

chica nueva
Local time: 15:14
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 83
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