dolly

English translation: below

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:dolly
English translation:below

23:37 Jan 31, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
English term or phrase: dolly
electrical switch, (electrical) switch plate, rocker dolly, rotating dolly, push dolly. In some cases, "dolly" appears to be some kind of lever, in other cases it seems to be a (rotating) knob, or a push-botton. It is not a wheeled artifact
Juan Callens
below
Explanation:
definitions found


From WordNet (r) 2.0 (August 2003) :

dolly
n 1: conveyance consisting of a wheeled support on which a camera
can be mounted
2: conveyance consisting of a wheeled platform for moving heavy
objects

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary :

Dolly \Dol"ly\, n.; pl. Dollies.
1. (Mining) A contrivance, turning on a vertical axis by a
handle or winch, and giving a circular motion to the ore
to be washed; a stirrer.

2. (Mach.) A tool with an indented head for shaping the head
of a rivet. --Knight.

3. In pile driving, a block interposed between the head of
the pile and the ram of the driver.




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Note added at 16 mins (2004-01-31 23:53:54 GMT)
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http://www.wordiq.com/cgi-bin/knowledge/dictionary.cgi?Form=...

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Note added at 20 mins (2004-01-31 23:57:20 GMT)
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more
A low mobile platform that rolls on casters, used for transporting heavy loads. b. Such a platform as used by one working underneath a motor vehicle. c. A hand truck. 3. A wheeled apparatus used to transport a movie or television camera about a set. 4. A small locomotive, as for use in a railroad yard or on a construction site. 5. A wooden implement for stirring clothes in a washtub. 6. A tool used to hold one end of a rivet while the opposite end is being hammered to form a head. 7. A small piece of wood or metal placed on the head of a pile to prevent damage to the pile while it is being driven.


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Note added at 20 mins (2004-01-31 23:57:37 GMT)
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http://www.bartleby.com/61/96/D0329600.html
Selected response from:

Iolanta Vlaykova Paneva
Canada
Local time: 15:29
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +6type of switch
Marijke Singer
3 +5dolly: electrical
DGK T-I
4 +3below
Iolanta Vlaykova Paneva


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
below


Explanation:
definitions found


From WordNet (r) 2.0 (August 2003) :

dolly
n 1: conveyance consisting of a wheeled support on which a camera
can be mounted
2: conveyance consisting of a wheeled platform for moving heavy
objects

From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary :

Dolly \Dol"ly\, n.; pl. Dollies.
1. (Mining) A contrivance, turning on a vertical axis by a
handle or winch, and giving a circular motion to the ore
to be washed; a stirrer.

2. (Mach.) A tool with an indented head for shaping the head
of a rivet. --Knight.

3. In pile driving, a block interposed between the head of
the pile and the ram of the driver.




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Note added at 16 mins (2004-01-31 23:53:54 GMT)
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http://www.wordiq.com/cgi-bin/knowledge/dictionary.cgi?Form=...

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Note added at 20 mins (2004-01-31 23:57:20 GMT)
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more
A low mobile platform that rolls on casters, used for transporting heavy loads. b. Such a platform as used by one working underneath a motor vehicle. c. A hand truck. 3. A wheeled apparatus used to transport a movie or television camera about a set. 4. A small locomotive, as for use in a railroad yard or on a construction site. 5. A wooden implement for stirring clothes in a washtub. 6. A tool used to hold one end of a rivet while the opposite end is being hammered to form a head. 7. A small piece of wood or metal placed on the head of a pile to prevent damage to the pile while it is being driven.


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Note added at 20 mins (2004-01-31 23:57:37 GMT)
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http://www.bartleby.com/61/96/D0329600.html

Iolanta Vlaykova Paneva
Canada
Local time: 15:29
Native speaker of: Bulgarian
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rowan Morrell: Pretty comprehensive.
5 hrs
  -> thank you -:)

agree  eldira: a complete reply to a short word
7 hrs
  -> thanks -:)

neutral  DGK T-I: it seems likely that the 1st.sentence:"electrical....push dolly" is the phrase(containing'dolly)that the asker isn't sure about,and the rest is a question about what it could be,made after looking at the dictionary definition ~
7 hrs
  -> ?

agree  chopra_2002
11 hrs
  -> thank you -:)

agree  cheungmo: What makes a dolly switch a dolly switch is when the thing one moves to switch is like a stick rather than a knob or something "un-stick-like".
13 hrs
  -> thank you -:))

disagree  Laurel Porter (X): what is cheungmo doing agreeing when what s/he says is completely foreign to all these defs - none of which fit the context, IMO
14 hrs
  -> sorry you didn't find any fitting the context but there are some..I'm she -:)))

agree  MatthewS
1 day 2 hrs
  -> many thanks :)

disagree  nyamuk: Could you just say what it is, or at least summarize rather than posting references that you have found to the word dolly. None of the various platforms with wheels refrenced here seems like the dolly we are looking for.
1 day 2 hrs
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
type of switch


Explanation:
See website:
http://cgi.byrons.force9.co.uk/acatalog/traditional_trading_...

where they show you all types of dolly type switches (usually with a little knobly bit).

More can be seen at:
http://www.forbesandlomax.co.uk/public_html/htm_files/sw_dol...

"The Forbes & Lomax Dolly switches are available in all plate finishes.

The switches are available in 2 way and intermediate. 1 way, 2 way and off (three position), and double pole switches are available on request.

Dolly switches can be mixed with Button Dimmer Controllers on the same plate.

Vertical switches can be made to order."

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Note added at 9 hrs 53 mins (2004-02-01 09:30:19 GMT)
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Rotary switch, rocker switch, rotation switch and push switch are pretty standard \'switches\':
http://www.e-switch.com/thumbs.php
http://www.shinden.com/english/

Marijke Singer
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:29
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 72

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DGK T-I: good refences ~
7 hrs
  -> Thank you! Juan specifically said it wasn't a "wheeled artifact"!

agree  Mario Marcolin
11 hrs
  -> Thank you Mario!

agree  Laurel Porter (X)
14 hrs
  -> Thank you Laurel!

agree  MatthewS
1 day 2 hrs
  -> Thank you MatthewS!

agree  nyamuk: I always thought it meant 'toggle' but rotating and rocker adds some doubt. Certainly a type of switch though.
1 day 2 hrs
  -> Thanks nyamuk!

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
2 days 13 hrs
  -> Thank you Svetozar!
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
dolly: electrical


Explanation:
"Electrical Engineering.
Dolly, the operating member of a tumbler switch; it consists of a small pivoted lever projecting through the outer cover. "
(1940 Chambers's Techn. Dict. 257/2)

So dolly switches defined like this make sense as switches operated by toggles(the levers with knobs on the end), and the dolly is the lever/toggle. It seems logical that the 'rocker dolly' would be meant to be a toggle that clicked in 2 directions - Marjike's refs and the ones I found just call this a dolly switch. It seems less likely that a lever/toggle like this would push - so perhaps 'push dolly' is being used loosely to mean a 'push button/knob'. A lever/toggle might swivel in different directions to control something, but when we already have a 'push dolly' which seems to be a button not a lever/toggle, it seems quite likely that this might be a knob as well and dolly is again being used loosely. If both these are being used loosely for knobs/buttons not levers/toggles, it seems possible that the 'rocker dolly' might be being used loosely too, as the common rocker switch which we see so much nowadays (picture: http://www.ashley-norton.com/electrical/series1/a4/victorian... ).

It sounds from the asker's comment in the question, "In some cases....It's not a wheeled artifact[!:-)]", as if the asker was already thinking along these lines after looking it up in the dictionary and not finding the def.there - many dictionaries don't contain the explanation of dolly switches.

Naturally I will defer to the wisdom of any wise electrical engineering colleagues who visit the question :-)


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Note added at 9 hrs 11 mins (2004-02-01 08:49:07 GMT)
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(it\'s probably obvious, but just in case: the rocker dolly, rotating dolly, & push dolly all seem to form part of an electrical kit or component list for a switch assembly(-ies), together with the electrical switch & (electrical) switch plate.)

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Note added at 9 hrs 24 mins (2004-02-01 09:01:22 GMT)
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If there is more than one control on each plate, it could also be an abbrieviated way of writing the mixture: dolly(toggle/lever) + rocker, rotating knob + dolly, push button + dolly - it seems less attractive to me at this moment, but still plausible.

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Note added at 9 hrs 26 mins (2004-02-01 09:03:26 GMT)
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(I vote for Marjike\'s answer.)

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Note added at 15 hrs 1 min (2004-02-01 14:38:43 GMT)
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(Marjike answered first :-)


    Chambers technical dictionary 1940
    OED
DGK T-I
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:29
PRO pts in pair: 401

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marijke Singer: Your research is not bad either!
1 hr

agree  chopra_2002
2 hrs

agree  Laurel Porter (X): even more comprehensive - too bad Marijke got there 1st ;-)
5 hrs

agree  MatthewS
17 hrs

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
2 days 4 hrs
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