less than an engineer more than a technician

English translation: engineering technologist

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:less than an engineer, more than a technician
English translation:engineering technologist
Entered by: Ildiko Santana

20:56 Jan 12, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
English term or phrase: less than an engineer more than a technician
I am looking for a term to describe a graduate of a two year course in engineering (less than an engineer, more than a technician). In Israel they are sometimes called Practical Engineers, but that seems to be a local invention.
Leah Aharoni
Local time: 21:23
technician or (engineering) technologist
Explanation:
Dear Leah,

I fully agree with your approach that you should avoid using a "local invention" (practical engineer) without proof that the invented term is widely used in the country of the target language (English).

I went to a few college sites and it seems no one is entitled to use the title "engineer" after a 2-year course, and there doesn't seem to be an in-between term other than "technician" or "technologist" in these cases. So, while you raise a valid need, I would suggest you use "technician" or "(engineering) technologist."

Examples for both:

"These vocationally-based courses will prepare you for a career in electronics or other areas of engineering. Work experience opportunities are available on some GNVQ/AVCE courses and you may also learn a foreign language to complement your studies. There is clear progression through GNVQ to AVCE, leading to higher education. Successful students may also gain employment as *technicians*."

"Electrical *engineering technologists* find employment in such areas as computer systems and networks, electronics, telecommunications, power generation and distribution, controls, instrumentation and automation."
Selected response from:

Ildiko Santana
United States
Local time: 11:23
Grading comment
I chacked engineering technologist and it worked! Thank you very much
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1technician or (engineering) technologist
Ildiko Santana
3 +2associate engineer
Maria Nicholas
1 +4I don't believe such a specific term exists...
Tony M


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +4
I don't believe such a specific term exists...


Explanation:
... so I would suggest your invented term might be the best solution, or alternatively:

junior engineer
senior technician

...or something along those lines

Tony M
France
Local time: 20:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3273

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria Nicholas
7 mins
  -> Thanks, Maria!

agree  Ildiko Santana: I think both Dusty and Maria deserve Kudoz here - for their good sportsmanship! :)
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, idilko

agree  RHELLER: (sr) technician (2 yr degrees from junior/technical colleges in US are for techs)
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rita!

agree  Rahi Moosavi: you may refer to www.asme.org or www.ashrae.org, I think they have some sort of terminology for this issue
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rahi!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
associate engineer


Explanation:
Just another possibility. Agree that a specific term may not exist.

In the States, there also exist pre-engineering programs where a student can study liberal arts and receive two years of professional training before further specialization. So, possibly you can refer to such a person as a pre-engineer, although I don't think it's the most elegant of terms ...


    Reference: http://departments.colgate.edu/physics/curricular/preengin.h...
Maria Nicholas
Local time: 14:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in pair: 17

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, I think this would be a good way round it! In the UK, people are often an 'associate something' before they become a 'chartered one'
8 mins
  -> Thanks, Dusty!

agree  Ildiko Santana: I think both Dusty and Maria deserve Kudoz here - for their good sportsmanship! :)
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
technician or (engineering) technologist


Explanation:
Dear Leah,

I fully agree with your approach that you should avoid using a "local invention" (practical engineer) without proof that the invented term is widely used in the country of the target language (English).

I went to a few college sites and it seems no one is entitled to use the title "engineer" after a 2-year course, and there doesn't seem to be an in-between term other than "technician" or "technologist" in these cases. So, while you raise a valid need, I would suggest you use "technician" or "(engineering) technologist."

Examples for both:

"These vocationally-based courses will prepare you for a career in electronics or other areas of engineering. Work experience opportunities are available on some GNVQ/AVCE courses and you may also learn a foreign language to complement your studies. There is clear progression through GNVQ to AVCE, leading to higher education. Successful students may also gain employment as *technicians*."

"Electrical *engineering technologists* find employment in such areas as computer systems and networks, electronics, telecommunications, power generation and distribution, controls, instrumentation and automation."


    Reference: http://www.barnet.ac.uk/acatalog/Engineering.html
    Reference: http://fduinfo.com/majors/uccse-bs-eetup2.php3
Ildiko Santana
United States
Local time: 11:23
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 162
Grading comment
I chacked engineering technologist and it worked! Thank you very much

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rahi Moosavi
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search