P.Johnson

English translation: mate, pal, friend

09:48 Mar 8, 2016
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Marketing - Textiles / Clothing / Fashion
English term or phrase: P.Johnson
P.Johnson
Like your suiting with just a soup{ut2}on of Savile?
You're in luck, Chuck.
Ivan Niu
China
Local time: 23:15
Selected answer:mate, pal, friend
Explanation:
What's up, Chuck?

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Note added at 41 mins (2016-03-08 10:29:56 GMT)
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Just slip out the back, Jack
Make a new plan, Stan
You don't need to be coy, Roy
Just get yourself free
Hop on the bus, Gus
You don't need to discuss much
Just drop off the key, Lee
And get yourself free
(Paul Simon)
Selected response from:

Cilian O'Tuama
Germany
Local time: 16:15
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for your very helpful explanation!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +5mate, pal, friend
Cilian O'Tuama
3 +2just a touch...
Jack Doughty
4P. Johnson Tailors
Yvonne Gallagher
4Dear
B D Finch


Discussion entries: 12





  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
P. Johnson Tailors


Explanation:
it's a company that tailors suits if that's what you're asking?

https://pjt.com/about
https://pjt.com/

otherwise, as Jack says, "soupçon" (note spelling) is a French word used in English and means a smidgeon or tiny bit, a hint

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 15:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 11
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
soupçon
just a touch...


Explanation:
P.Johnson
Like your suiting with just a soup{ut2}on of Savile?
You\'re in luck, Chuck.
What P. Johnson means is:
Would you like your suit to look a little as if it had been made in Savile Row? (A street in London where all the best tailors are located)
We can do that for you, Chuck.

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Note added at 23 mins (2016-03-08 10:11:23 GMT)
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Chuck = Charles, see discussion.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:15
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
Notes to answerer
Asker: Dear Jack, thanks for your answer. Do you know the meaning of Chuck here? I made a wrong entry when asking the question. Thanks in advance!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: I don't know why the question header is "P. Johnson", but I'm assuming that (a) this is the bit that Ivan is asking about, and (b) it's not a reference to Jimmy Savile!
4 mins
  -> Thank you. No, I'm sure Savile Row didn't approve of Jimmy's clothes.

agree  acetran
6 days
  -> Thank you.
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
p.johnson ... Chuck
Dear


Explanation:
"Chuck" is a northern English expression that means "dear". I am sure it would not be used by a Savile Row tailor!

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Note added at 34 mins (2016-03-08 10:22:52 GMT)
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It is an informal affectionate form of address.

http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/41/messages/198.htm...
"What is the meaning and origin of "tara chuck"...we yanks haven't got a clue?
.... It means 'good bye, my dear (or any endearment you prefer)'. It is North West of England dialect."

"

The sweet war-man is dead and rotten; sweet chucks,
beat not the bones of the buried: when he breathed,
he was a man. But I will forward with my device.
To the PRINCESS
Sweet royalty, bestow on me the sense of hearing."

Shakespeare, "Love's Labor's Lost" Act V, Scene II.

B D Finch
France
Local time: 16:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  philgoddard: Possibly, but the name Chuck is more likely, as your "chuck" is usually pronounced "chook", which doesn't rhyme with "luck" in standard British English. Also, they've used a capital letter.
15 mins
  -> Part of my youth was misspent in Manchester and "chuck" always rhymed with "luck" when I heard it there! The vowel sound of both was halfway between London pronounciation and "look" and "bus" had the same "u" as "sugar".
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
chuck
mate, pal, friend


Explanation:
What's up, Chuck?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 41 mins (2016-03-08 10:29:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just slip out the back, Jack
Make a new plan, Stan
You don't need to be coy, Roy
Just get yourself free
Hop on the bus, Gus
You don't need to discuss much
Just drop off the key, Lee
And get yourself free
(Paul Simon)

Cilian O'Tuama
Germany
Local time: 16:15
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for your very helpful explanation!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Louisa Tchaicha: I think it means "pal" here
1 hr

agree  Charles Davis: You get my vote largely for quoting the Paul Simon song, which instantly came to my mind. It's there for the rhyme.
2 hrs
  -> right, like 'What's the story, Rory'

agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa
5 hrs

agree  Victoria Britten
10 hrs

agree  acetran
6 days
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