\"max\" / \"min\" OR \"max.\" / \"min.\" (in UK English)?

English translation: max. min.

14:46 Nov 29, 2016
English language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Transport / Transportation / Shipping / use of punctuation
English term or phrase: \"max\" / \"min\" OR \"max.\" / \"min.\" (in UK English)?
Never sure. I prefer full stops, but thought I'd see what people think.

My current text is a logistics-related manual.
Michael Beijer
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:16
Selected answer:max. min.
Explanation:
I also prefer to use a full stop because "max." and "min." are abbreviations. If a full stop is not used, it may cause some ambiguity.

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Note added at 25 mins (2016-11-29 15:12:17 GMT)
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The same abbreviations appear in this supplier logistics manual although sometimes you see them with a full stop and sometimes without one: http://purchasing.bosch.com/media/de/cp_documents/en/LHL_V_3...

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Note added at 29 mins (2016-11-29 15:16:12 GMT)
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In any case, a full stop should really be used to show that the word is abbreviated.
Selected response from:

Andrew Darling
Spain
Local time: 11:16
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
5 +7max. min.
Andrew Darling
Summary of reference entries provided
without full stop
Kaspar Müürsepp
From The Economist Style Guide
James A. Walsh

Discussion entries: 16





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +7
\"max\" / \"min\" or \"max.\" / \"min.\" (in uk english)?
max. min.


Explanation:
I also prefer to use a full stop because "max." and "min." are abbreviations. If a full stop is not used, it may cause some ambiguity.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 25 mins (2016-11-29 15:12:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The same abbreviations appear in this supplier logistics manual although sometimes you see them with a full stop and sometimes without one: http://purchasing.bosch.com/media/de/cp_documents/en/LHL_V_3...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 29 mins (2016-11-29 15:16:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In any case, a full stop should really be used to show that the word is abbreviated.

Andrew Darling
Spain
Local time: 11:16
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  James A. Walsh
25 mins

agree  Charles Davis: Unquestionably they should have full stops
34 mins

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: How about: with the volume turned up to the max...?
34 mins

agree  Armorel Young: Yes, and the Oxford Dictionary as well as the Oxford Manual of Style support this view.
34 mins

agree  Jack Doughty
2 hrs

agree  acetran
2 hrs

agree  Tony M: Although strict grammar rules require the full-stops (as the abbreviation does not contain the normal final letter of the word), in some specific situations I DO omit them.
7 hrs

agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa
5 days
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Reference comments


8 mins
Reference: without full stop

Reference information:
Merriam-Webster gives it without full stops. It could also be analyzed from the perspective of necessity: what would the full stops add, if used? I'm not sure they're needed, as the short forms are well-known enough.

Example sentence(s):
  • The boat can hold a max of 20 people.

    Reference: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/max
Kaspar Müürsepp
Estonia
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EstonianEstonian
Note to reference poster
Asker: @Charles: yes, in my text they are definitely being used as the abbreviations, not the (informal) words


Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
neutral  Charles Davis: As a word rather than an abbreviation it is informal and unsuitable in technical contexts.
35 mins
neutral  Armorel Young: The Oxford Dict. actually describes "a max" as a different usage (and N. Amer. colloq. at that) from the abbreviations max. and min.
38 mins
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36 mins peer agreement (net): +3
Reference: From The Economist Style Guide

Reference information:
"full stops (periods) The American convention is to use full stops
(periods) at the end of almost all abbreviations and contractions.
The British convention is to use full stops after abbreviations – eg,
abbr., adj., co. – but not after contractions – eg, Dr, Mr, Mrs, St."

James A. Walsh
Spain
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  acetran
1 hr
  -> Thanks, acetran.
agree  Tony M
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Tony.
agree  Björn Vrooman: Since it's part of your explanation: "eg/e.g.," however, is a contentious subject. As it is not a contraction, I had to grin when they said "use full stops after abbreviations" and start off with "eg" (yes, it's Latin; just shows you it's not all B&W).
1 day 21 hrs
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