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Arabic translation: كَلام، خطاب، كَلمة

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:speech
Arabic translation:كَلام، خطاب، كَلمة
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
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05:42 Nov 30, 2001
English to Arabic translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: speech
how do i say the word "speech" in arabic
althaf
كَلام، خطاب
Explanation:
How one says, “speech” in Arabic depends on the context and intended meaning. For example, if by “speech” you mean the faculty of expressing or communicating ideas in words and sentences, then you would use the word KALAM (first A is short, second A is long, stress on the second syllable) كَلام

KALIM (both vowels are short, primary stress on the first syllable) كَلم has a similar meaning but is less commonly used today than it used to be.

Speech that is directed towards a specific targeted audience is called KHITAB (short I, long A, stress on the second syllable) خطاب

Today, KHITAB is most often used for two purposes:

1. KHITAB is often used for “speech” in the sense of a public address, such as a presidential speech.

In medieval times, the word KHUTBA was used for that purpose (both syllables are short, primary stress is on the first syllable, KH sounds like the German CH, as in “Bach,” the U is like the U in “pull”) خُطبة

Today, KHUTBA is used most often in reference to sermons.

KHUTBA is to be distinguished from KHITBA, which means “marriage proposal”.

2. KHITAB is also often used today for “letter” or “correspondence”.

Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2001-12-14 18:52:34 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

While KHITAB is used today for very formal, solemn speeches by high-ranking officilas, KALIMA (which literally means "word") is commonly used today for speeches that are less formal or less solemn speeches, or speeches by lesser officials.
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3كَلام، خطابFuad Yahya
4 +1KALIMA كَلمةFuad Yahya
4الكلمة التالية يلقيها عليناMona Helal
4HadeethMona Helal
4Nutq / Ta’beer / kalaam / Khitaab / hewaar / QaawolRaghad


  

Answers


33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
كَلام، خطاب


Explanation:
How one says, “speech” in Arabic depends on the context and intended meaning. For example, if by “speech” you mean the faculty of expressing or communicating ideas in words and sentences, then you would use the word KALAM (first A is short, second A is long, stress on the second syllable) كَلام

KALIM (both vowels are short, primary stress on the first syllable) كَلم has a similar meaning but is less commonly used today than it used to be.

Speech that is directed towards a specific targeted audience is called KHITAB (short I, long A, stress on the second syllable) خطاب

Today, KHITAB is most often used for two purposes:

1. KHITAB is often used for “speech” in the sense of a public address, such as a presidential speech.

In medieval times, the word KHUTBA was used for that purpose (both syllables are short, primary stress is on the first syllable, KH sounds like the German CH, as in “Bach,” the U is like the U in “pull”) خُطبة

Today, KHUTBA is used most often in reference to sermons.

KHUTBA is to be distinguished from KHITBA, which means “marriage proposal”.

2. KHITAB is also often used today for “letter” or “correspondence”.

Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2001-12-14 18:52:34 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

While KHITAB is used today for very formal, solemn speeches by high-ranking officilas, KALIMA (which literally means "word") is commonly used today for speeches that are less formal or less solemn speeches, or speeches by lesser officials.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Neveen El-Gamal: I think Khutba is most commonly used for speech.
2 days 19 hrs

agree  shfranke: Khutba for 'formal sppech or oration'
7 days

agree  AhmedAMS
20 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Nutq / Ta’beer / kalaam / Khitaab / hewaar / Qaawol


Explanation:
The exact meaning of “speech” depends on the full text.

Some suggestions:

Speech: the ability to talk:
Nutq نطق

Speech: utterance
Talafuth تلفظ (th sounds like the in brother)

Speech: express (feelings, ideas.. etc)
Ta’beer تعبير

Speech: talk:
kalaam كلام or hadeeth حديث (th sounds like th in thin)

Speech: formal talk (given usually to a large number of people on a special occasion):
Khitaab خطاب

Speech: conversation:
Muhaadathah محادثة (th sounds like th in thin)

Speech: dialogue:
hewaar حوار

Speech: something that is spoken:
Qaawol قول

Speech: dialect of a nation or region: (British speech)
Lahjah لهجة

Speech: rumor
Ishaa’ah إشاعة


Raghad
Local time: 04:06
PRO pts in pair: 160
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Hadeeth


Explanation:
حديث

is another word for 'speech' if derived from 'speak' يتحدث = Yatahaddath.

'Speaking' could be expressed as either يتكلم = Yatakallam OR يتحدث = Yatahaddath.

So 'speech' could be translated as حديث = Hadeeth OR كلام = Kalaam.

HTH

Mona Helal
Local time: 13:06
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 397
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22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
الكلمة التالية يلقيها علينا


Explanation:
Al-Kalima At-Taliyah Yulqeeha 'Alayna...
Meaning: The next speech by ....

Or
الخطاب التالي يلقيه علينا
Al-Khitaab At-Tali Yulqeeh 'Alayna ...
Meaning: The next speech by ...

HTH

Mona Helal
Local time: 13:06
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 397
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
KALIMA كَلمة


Explanation:
Now that you finally have made the context clear, we can begin to address your needs in meaningful way.

In modern standard Arabic, a public speech delivered by someone at an event is called KALIMA, which literally means "word."

I assume from your latest clarification (“conversion of the words in capital letters into Arabic form”) that you are capable of fitting the individual words into their sentences, maintaining correct Arabic syntax.

Fuad

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
18 days
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