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Thusness

Arabic translation: JAWHAR-ALHAQUIQA

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:thusness
Arabic translation:JAWHAR-ALHAQUIQA
Entered by: Boushra Ezzideen
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10:27 Apr 5, 2001
English to Arabic translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: Thusness
True thusness is the substance of thought and thought is the function of true thusness.
What does thusness refer to in this context.
Thanks
P.S. I cannot read Arabic writing on my computer.
Boushra2u
JAWHAR ALHAQEEQA, ALHAQEEQA KAMA HIYA, ALWAQI' ALASMA
Explanation:
Boushra,

Your question says, “what does thusness refer to in this context?” This does not sound like an explicit request for suggestions for an Arabic equivalent term – just some light to be shed on the concept.

Your warning about the lack of Arabic language support in your computer, however, tells me that you do wish to also receive some translation suggestions, even if not entirely necessary for your immediate need. With this possibly faulty understanding, I will try to do both:

“Thusness” is a sorry accident of a word. It is the kind of word that “happens” to a language, like an allergic reaction, when it fails to grapple with a thought system that is alien to its roots, in this case English grappling with Buddhism.

“Thus” is the quaint, familiar adverb that needs no introduction; “-ness” is the equally familiar suffix appended to adjectives to make nouns. The folly of appending “-ness” to adverbs (or even verbs) has never stopped anyone from fashioning such monstrosities as “thusness,” “suchness,” isness,” and “nowness.”

Infelicitous morphology aside, what is it supposed to signify? The closest that I have come to an academic definition of “thusness” is the following:

“Causation by thusness (tathata)—The Buddha-nature hidden within all of us is in some sense the ultimate reality. It is called "thusness." It can be static, which is called nirvana, or dynamic, which is the phenomenal world we live in.”

(from Chinese Philosophies (PHL237H1-F), Lecture Guide, Tuesday, June 13th, 2000, at the Computing in the Humanities and Social Sciences (CHASS) program at the Faculty of Arts & Science, University of Toronto, available at:

http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~glmayeda/PHL237H1F/PHL237S-lec...

So “thusness” is how English writers came to express their understanding of the Buddhist concept of “ultimate reality,” which transcends all thought.

Although I have a degree in philosophy, I am much more inclined by nature to mow the lawn and rotate the tires than to wallow in “thusness” and “suchness.” I am, however, enticed by the prospect of finding an equivalent Arabic term.

Will it be a similar morphological oddity? Arabs of olden days did not flinch from making up such terms as “Kayfiyya” and “kammiyya” from the interrogatives “kayfa” and “kam”. These two words have proven so perennially useful that we hardly think of them as oddities anymore. “Haythiyya” has been less popular, but has never waned since it was introduced.

Could we then take a word like “katha,” “hakatha,” or “kathalika” and make up a word like “alkathalikiyya”? You may be laughing, but, really, why not?

Less adventurous souls would rather go for such terms as

JAWHAR ALHAQEEQA, ALHAQEEQA KAMA HIYA, ALWAQI' ALASMA, ALWAQI’ KAMA HUWA

or similar descriptive terms.

I have no preference either way, but I am curious about what you think.

Fuad
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Hi Fouad,
I knew you could be the one to provide me with the correct answer to my question. After reading through your explicit understanding of the word "thusness", it was quite hard to decide on the correct translation, but I am going to choose " JAWHAR AL-WOJOUD". Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naJAWHAR ALHAQEEQA, ALHAQEEQA KAMA HIYA, ALWAQI' ALASMAFuad Yahya
naRealityRaghad


  

Answers


2 hrs
Reality


Explanation:
Thusness:
Essence. Presence. Actuality. Metaphysics of presence. Existence. Reality. Actuality. Material world.
(Bloomsbury Thesaurus)

“True Thusness”:
is a Buddhist term (tathataa).
It means:
suchness.
Things as they are.
For something to be as it is.
The establishment of reality as empty.
the nature of existence.
Universally pervading principle.
The existence of the mind as true reality.
The source of all existence
'Reality-nature'
'As-it-is-ness.'


Raghad
Local time: 08:23
PRO pts in pair: 160

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Boushra Ezzideen
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs
JAWHAR ALHAQEEQA, ALHAQEEQA KAMA HIYA, ALWAQI' ALASMA


Explanation:
Boushra,

Your question says, “what does thusness refer to in this context?” This does not sound like an explicit request for suggestions for an Arabic equivalent term – just some light to be shed on the concept.

Your warning about the lack of Arabic language support in your computer, however, tells me that you do wish to also receive some translation suggestions, even if not entirely necessary for your immediate need. With this possibly faulty understanding, I will try to do both:

“Thusness” is a sorry accident of a word. It is the kind of word that “happens” to a language, like an allergic reaction, when it fails to grapple with a thought system that is alien to its roots, in this case English grappling with Buddhism.

“Thus” is the quaint, familiar adverb that needs no introduction; “-ness” is the equally familiar suffix appended to adjectives to make nouns. The folly of appending “-ness” to adverbs (or even verbs) has never stopped anyone from fashioning such monstrosities as “thusness,” “suchness,” isness,” and “nowness.”

Infelicitous morphology aside, what is it supposed to signify? The closest that I have come to an academic definition of “thusness” is the following:

“Causation by thusness (tathata)—The Buddha-nature hidden within all of us is in some sense the ultimate reality. It is called "thusness." It can be static, which is called nirvana, or dynamic, which is the phenomenal world we live in.”

(from Chinese Philosophies (PHL237H1-F), Lecture Guide, Tuesday, June 13th, 2000, at the Computing in the Humanities and Social Sciences (CHASS) program at the Faculty of Arts & Science, University of Toronto, available at:

http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~glmayeda/PHL237H1F/PHL237S-lec...

So “thusness” is how English writers came to express their understanding of the Buddhist concept of “ultimate reality,” which transcends all thought.

Although I have a degree in philosophy, I am much more inclined by nature to mow the lawn and rotate the tires than to wallow in “thusness” and “suchness.” I am, however, enticed by the prospect of finding an equivalent Arabic term.

Will it be a similar morphological oddity? Arabs of olden days did not flinch from making up such terms as “Kayfiyya” and “kammiyya” from the interrogatives “kayfa” and “kam”. These two words have proven so perennially useful that we hardly think of them as oddities anymore. “Haythiyya” has been less popular, but has never waned since it was introduced.

Could we then take a word like “katha,” “hakatha,” or “kathalika” and make up a word like “alkathalikiyya”? You may be laughing, but, really, why not?

Less adventurous souls would rather go for such terms as

JAWHAR ALHAQEEQA, ALHAQEEQA KAMA HIYA, ALWAQI' ALASMA, ALWAQI’ KAMA HUWA

or similar descriptive terms.

I have no preference either way, but I am curious about what you think.

Fuad



    Chinese Philosophies (PHL237H1-F), Lecture Guide, Tuesday, June 13th, 2000
    Computing in the Humanities and Social Sciences (CHASS) program at the Faculty of Arts & Science, University of Toronto
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167
Grading comment
Hi Fouad,
I knew you could be the one to provide me with the correct answer to my question. After reading through your explicit understanding of the word "thusness", it was quite hard to decide on the correct translation, but I am going to choose " JAWHAR AL-WOJOUD". Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Boushra Ezzideen
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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