KudoZ home » English to Arabic » Art/Literary

You are a sexy man

Arabic translation: أنت رجلٌ فاتن

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:You are a sexy man
Arabic translation:أنت رجلٌ فاتن
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

06:30 Jul 10, 2001
English to Arabic translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: You are a sexy man
love
Louise
أنت رجلٌ فاتن
Explanation:
Pronounced: ANTA RAJULUN FATIN.

All the answers you have received so far are correct, depending on the nature of your question.

Translators distinguish two kinds of translation requests:

1. Reader/Listener Requests: “Please translate this text that I have received”: The requester needs to comprehend what was really intended by the writer. The translator cannot change anything in the text, but if the concepts in the source material are not transparent to the target language, the translator ought to include explanatory notes, which should address matters relevant to the purpose of the translation (business, literary, scientific, personal, etc.). If an Arabic-speaking person received the statement “You are a sexy man” in English, a translator would be justified in translating the statement the way Yacine did, but would also be justified in explaining the term further, using the terms that Raghad and Al-Tahir used. I would probably use the term FATIN, as I think it conveys the sense of sensual provocativeness perhaps a bit more idiomatically.

2. Writer/Speaker Requests: “Please translate this text that I wish to address to [target audience]: The requester needs help formulating the text in a manner that conveys the intended meaning as well as speaks to the linguistic and cultural presuppositions of the target audience. In this case, translation is a collaborative act, akin to editing. Your question most likely fits in this category. In this case, a translator is justified in giving you Yacine’s translation as a baseline, but is also justified in explaining a few linguistic and cultural points to help you state what you have in mind most clearly and most effectively. Such points would include:

A. JINS is the common word for “sex.” The adjective is JINSIYY (the feminine form is JINSIYYA). In most contexts, JINSIYY is translated as “sexual.” There is nothing inherently wrong about using it for “sexy,” and I have seen it used in that sense. When used in that sense, it is considered rather direct. In using such a direct term, one is indicating a comfortable level of familiarity with the addressee. To a spouse, the term would not be considered vulgar. If one is not entirely certain, alternatives may be suggested.

B. Decorum and expressiveness may suggest using other terms, such as the terms suggested by Raghad and Al-Tahir, which bear explaining:

MUTHEER (TH sounds like TH in “thick”) means exciting, stimulating, rousing, thrilling, stirring, agitating, fomenting, agitating, instigating, provoking, provocative (Ajeeb.com dictionary). To make it more specific to the sexual context, one would say:

MUTHEER LISH-SHAHWA
MUTHEER LISH-SHAHAWAT
MUTHEER LIL-GHARA-IZ (GH sounds like a French R)
MUTHEER LIL-RAGHBA
MUTHEER LIL-HISS AL-JINSIYY
MUTHEER –LIL-JINS

JATH-THAB (TH sounds like TH in “than”) means attractive. To bring it closer to the sexual context, one would say:

JATH-THAB JINSIYYAN (“sexually attractive”)

I am recommending the term FATIN (the feminine form is FATINA). Among its many meanings are: seductive, tempting, luring, enticing, ravishing (Ajeeb.com dictionary). I am recommending it not because of its lexical entries, but because of the way it has been used in literature. The full sentence would be:

ANTA RAJULUN FATIN.

Fuad
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Thankyou, you provided a very complete, helpful and interesting answer.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
na +1أنت رجل جذابAl-Tahir Hafiz
na +1anta rajolon mootheerRaghad
na +1أنت رجلٌ فاتنFuad Yahya
naanta rajul jenseeyacine


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


30 mins peer agreement (net): +1
anta rajolon mootheer


Explanation:
anta rajolon mootheer (or mootheeron)
أنت رجل مثير
inakaa rajolon mootheeron
إنك رجل مثير
(The second sentence is more emphasizing.)
man: rajolon (pronounced: rajol without Arabic diacritics) رجل
sexy: mootheeron (mootheer without Arabic diacritics)مثير


Raghad
Local time: 13:42
PRO pts in pair: 160

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
86 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 hrs
anta rajul jensee


Explanation:
I hope it helps you.
yacine

yacine
Local time: 12:42
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 51
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
أنت رجل جذاب


Explanation:
لا حاجة

Al-Tahir Hafiz
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 14:42

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
85 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 3 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
أنت رجلٌ فاتن


Explanation:
Pronounced: ANTA RAJULUN FATIN.

All the answers you have received so far are correct, depending on the nature of your question.

Translators distinguish two kinds of translation requests:

1. Reader/Listener Requests: “Please translate this text that I have received”: The requester needs to comprehend what was really intended by the writer. The translator cannot change anything in the text, but if the concepts in the source material are not transparent to the target language, the translator ought to include explanatory notes, which should address matters relevant to the purpose of the translation (business, literary, scientific, personal, etc.). If an Arabic-speaking person received the statement “You are a sexy man” in English, a translator would be justified in translating the statement the way Yacine did, but would also be justified in explaining the term further, using the terms that Raghad and Al-Tahir used. I would probably use the term FATIN, as I think it conveys the sense of sensual provocativeness perhaps a bit more idiomatically.

2. Writer/Speaker Requests: “Please translate this text that I wish to address to [target audience]: The requester needs help formulating the text in a manner that conveys the intended meaning as well as speaks to the linguistic and cultural presuppositions of the target audience. In this case, translation is a collaborative act, akin to editing. Your question most likely fits in this category. In this case, a translator is justified in giving you Yacine’s translation as a baseline, but is also justified in explaining a few linguistic and cultural points to help you state what you have in mind most clearly and most effectively. Such points would include:

A. JINS is the common word for “sex.” The adjective is JINSIYY (the feminine form is JINSIYYA). In most contexts, JINSIYY is translated as “sexual.” There is nothing inherently wrong about using it for “sexy,” and I have seen it used in that sense. When used in that sense, it is considered rather direct. In using such a direct term, one is indicating a comfortable level of familiarity with the addressee. To a spouse, the term would not be considered vulgar. If one is not entirely certain, alternatives may be suggested.

B. Decorum and expressiveness may suggest using other terms, such as the terms suggested by Raghad and Al-Tahir, which bear explaining:

MUTHEER (TH sounds like TH in “thick”) means exciting, stimulating, rousing, thrilling, stirring, agitating, fomenting, agitating, instigating, provoking, provocative (Ajeeb.com dictionary). To make it more specific to the sexual context, one would say:

MUTHEER LISH-SHAHWA
MUTHEER LISH-SHAHAWAT
MUTHEER LIL-GHARA-IZ (GH sounds like a French R)
MUTHEER LIL-RAGHBA
MUTHEER LIL-HISS AL-JINSIYY
MUTHEER –LIL-JINS

JATH-THAB (TH sounds like TH in “than”) means attractive. To bring it closer to the sexual context, one would say:

JATH-THAB JINSIYYAN (“sexually attractive”)

I am recommending the term FATIN (the feminine form is FATINA). Among its many meanings are: seductive, tempting, luring, enticing, ravishing (Ajeeb.com dictionary). I am recommending it not because of its lexical entries, but because of the way it has been used in literature. The full sentence would be:

ANTA RAJULUN FATIN.

Fuad



    Reference: http://dictionary.ajeeb.com
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167
Grading comment
Thankyou, you provided a very complete, helpful and interesting answer.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
85 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search