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Shampoo and conditioner

Arabic translation: الشامبو والبلسم

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Shampoo and conditioner
Arabic translation:الشامبو والبلسم
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04:33 Apr 27, 2001
English to Arabic translations [PRO]
Medical - Cosmetics, Beauty
English term or phrase: Shampoo and conditioner
As the thins we shampoo and condition our hair with.
Mona
الشامبو و البلسم
Explanation:
Shampoo has been commonly translated as شامبوwhen it refers to hair shampoo, which is your context here. For the general meaing of shampoo (e.g. carpet shampoo, suede shampoo, etc.) the Arabic transliteration may still work, or you could use صابون سائل.

For conditioner I found two translations, مكييف and يلسم. The latter (balsam) seems quite elegant, especially in the context of hair and cosmetics, although it carries some ambiguity because it is also the name of a class of herbs used as a cure and is itself a frequent ingredient of conditioners.
Selected response from:

Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 19:12
Grading comment
Thanks for your help. Thanks also to Fuad, I decided to go with the semi-established term, I didn't want to rock any boats.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naشامبو و ملطف
haytham amro
nashampoo: SHAMPOO, conditioner: BALSAM, MUTARRI, etc.Fuad Yahya
naالشامبو و البلسم
Alaa Zeineldine


  

Answers


2 hrs
الشامبو و البلسم


Explanation:
Shampoo has been commonly translated as شامبوwhen it refers to hair shampoo, which is your context here. For the general meaing of shampoo (e.g. carpet shampoo, suede shampoo, etc.) the Arabic transliteration may still work, or you could use صابون سائل.

For conditioner I found two translations, مكييف and يلسم. The latter (balsam) seems quite elegant, especially in the context of hair and cosmetics, although it carries some ambiguity because it is also the name of a class of herbs used as a cure and is itself a frequent ingredient of conditioners.


    Elias' Modern English Dictionary
    Reference: http://tarjim.ajeeb.com
Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 19:12
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2
Grading comment
Thanks for your help. Thanks also to Fuad, I decided to go with the semi-established term, I didn't want to rock any boats.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs
shampoo: SHAMPOO, conditioner: BALSAM, MUTARRI, etc.


Explanation:
We are probably stuck with SHAMPOO no matter how barbaric it sounds. I have seen MUNAZZIF and GHASOOL used by some puritans, but the usage rate of these terms, to my knowledge, has been abysmally low.

As a general-purpose term for “conditioner,” MUKAYYIF is unassailable (boldly derived from an interrogative). It has become quite at home in the context of air conditioning.

I see no harm in extending it to other applications, except that MUKAYYIF does not readily carry the connotation of restorative, rejuvenating action, which is the intended meaning for hair, but, for that matter, neither does “conditioner.” It is only by constant use and semantic association that “conditioner” has “acquired” that meaning. So MUKAYYIF seems like a good candidate, unless there is a term that already carries the connotation of restorative action.

BALSAM does. “Balsam” is a name (of a Semitic origin) for a number of tree species that produce aromatic resins. The word is also applied to the resin itself, which has been used as a restorative or soothing agent since ancient times. At some point, the word was further extended to signify any substance used for that purpose. In English, the derivative word “balm” is most commonly used for that meaning.

BALSAM, therefore, seems like a strong challenger to MUKAYYIF when the context is hair (or skin) conditioning. The term is popular in Egypt, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia. Part of the reason is that a manufacturer used BALSAM as a brand name for its Mid-East localized product. Apparently, the product became so popular that its brand name acquired a generic status among many consumers (as happened to “Frigidaire,” “Delco,” and “Primus”). European usage (e.g., “balsam” in Swedish, “balsamo” in Italian) may also have contributed to its popularity.

In fact, how Europeans grappled with hair conditioning terminology is very instructive to the Arabic translator who is willing to try something new.

In German, it is called “Haarpflegemittel” (hair care implement”).

In French, it has several names:

“après-shampooing” (add it to your Frenglish glossary)

“démêlant” (from the verb “to uncurl, straighten, or untangle”)

“assouplissant” (from the verb “to relax or to make supple, pliant, or manageable”)

“crème nourrissante” (“cream nourishment”).

In Spanish, it is called “suavizante de cabello” (“hair softener”).

In Portuguese, it is called “condicionador” (“conditioner”).

These terms are courtesy of Atomica.com. You may need to switch to Western European (Windows) encoding to display the variously accented letters in some of these European words.

These European expressions may explain why some Arabic labels for hair conditioning products carry such terms as

مُطَرِّي
MUTARRI (carries the sense of action to soften, moisturize, and impart youthful freshness)

مُلَطِّف
MULATTIF (carries the sense of action to soothe and to produce comfort, delicacy, pleasantness and agreeableness)

مُرَخِّي
MURAKHI (carries the sense of relaxing stiff curls)

مُجَدِّد
MUJADDID (carries the sense of renewal)

مُصَحِّح
MUSAHHIH (carries the sense of action to restore and to impart health)

مُقَوِّم
MUQAWWIM (carries the sense of action to straighten kinkiness)

مُلَـيِّن
MULAYYIN (carries the sense of softening action)

مُنَعِّم
MUNA’’IM (carries the sense of action to soften, smooth, and impart luxury)


If used, any of these terms should be properly modified or contextualized, because their meanings are very broad. MULAYYIN, for instance, could be a stool softener, and MULATTIF could be an analgesic or air freshening spray.

Of the terms on this list, MUTARRI seems to be the most popular, but, by my unscientific reckoning, even MUTARRI is less popular than BALSAM. So if you are merely interested in using a semi-established term, BALSAM is pretty safe. If you want to challenge the established order, the arena seems reasonably open.

My only hesitation regarding BALSAM is the brand name association. If this is for a product label, there should be no problem, since the brand name will be prominently featured. But if this is for a general text, one needs to take care to make the reference clearly generic to the reader.


Fuad


    Al-Munjid
    Reference: http://atomica.com
Fuad Yahya
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
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17 hrs
شامبو و ملطف


Explanation:
The wording I have used above is the working used on all packs containing shampoo and conditioner. The words are spelled shampoo w mulattef.

haytham amro
Local time: 21:12
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Changes made by editors
Feb 7, 2006 - Changes made by Fuad Yahya:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO
Feb 7, 2006 - Changes made by Fuad Yahya:
FieldMarketing » Medical
Field (specific)(none) » Cosmetics, Beauty


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