KudoZ home » English to Arabic » Law/Patents

milestone

Arabic translation: مرحلة

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:milestone
Arabic translation:مرحلة
Entered by: Abdullah Mohamed Ahmed Bilal
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

02:06 May 29, 2001
English to Arabic translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
English term or phrase: milestone
Milestone: means an event upon the occurrence of which the corresponding MILESTONE PAYMENT is due and payable.
(This is part of a contract)
Abdalla Bilal
tasdidun mawqut تسديد موقوت
Explanation:
As Fuad explained, it is difficult to find a fitting term using the Arabic for milestone or its derivatives.

I have chosen to borrow the usage of the word miqaat ميقات from the rituals of the Hajj. The miqaat is one of several locations along the the route to Mecca where the pligrim must enter the state of "ihraam". The specific location depends on the direction the pilgrim is coming from. In general, miqaat is the place and/or time when an action becomes due.

The adjective would be mawqut موقوت or mu`aqqat مؤقت. Here are references from the Glorious Quran:

"إن الصلاة كانت على المؤمنين كتابا موقوتا"
"وإِذا الرسلُ أُقِّتَتْ"

Now mu`aqqat has the connotation of "postponed", so mawqut fits better in your context.

For payment, you could either use tasdid تسديد or duf'ah دُفعة. I chose tasdid since duf'ah is closer to the meaning of "installment", which is still not too far off.

With this, your phrase becomes (of course the infliction changes with the sentence):

tasdidun mawqut تسديد موقوت
duf'atun mawqutah دفعة موقوتة

You also have another alternative for mawqut, which is maw'ud موعود. The noun in this case is ميعاد, which means "the appointed time and/or place". For example:

"صبرا آل ياسر فإن موعدكم الجنة".

and "ard almi'aad أرض الميعاد", the land promised to the children of Ibrahim if they are keep their covenant.

Hope this helps,

Alaa Zeineldine

Selected response from:

Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 20:21
Grading comment
Many thanks to Fuad and Zeineldine. I think "marhala" and "tasdeed marhali" more suitable though not precise. Thanks again.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naAknowledgement
Alaa Zeineldine
natasdidun mawqut تسديد موقوت
Alaa Zeineldine
naمَعلَم أو إنجازFuad Yahya


  

Answers


6 hrs
مَعلَم أو إنجاز


Explanation:
My financial dictionary does not have an entry for "milestone" or "milestone payment." Neither does my dictionary of business management. I suppose I need to get a dictionary of contractual terms.

For the ordinary sense of "milestone," bilingual dictionaries give various Arabic terms, of which I prefer MA'LAM

مَعلَم

I find MA'LAM acceptable for your contractual context, unless you find a well-established technical term that you like.

I am also proposing INJAZ

إنجاز

Since that is what a milestone is in this sense.

I have also toyed with the term MARHALA

مَرحلة

...but I found it less than fully satisfactory, because it may give the impression of "milestone" being a mere time measurement, when in fact a milestone is an event or an accomplishment.

If nothing works, try a combination:

مَعلَم مرحلي
إنجاز مرحلي
مرحلة مَعلَمية
مرحلة إنجازية
مَعلَم إنجازي
إنجاز مَعلمي

Some of these combinations may sound downright ridiculous, but that is OK. This is just a process to get you to an acceptable term.

A good test of a term's usefulness is to check its morphological versatility. For instance, if we accept an Arabic term for "milestone", how would we then say "milestone payment"?

I hope you receive a response with an acceptable, well-established term. If not, the above may have enough material to help you coin one. Good luck.

Fuad


    Al-Mawrid, Ajeeb.com
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs
tasdidun mawqut تسديد موقوت


Explanation:
As Fuad explained, it is difficult to find a fitting term using the Arabic for milestone or its derivatives.

I have chosen to borrow the usage of the word miqaat ميقات from the rituals of the Hajj. The miqaat is one of several locations along the the route to Mecca where the pligrim must enter the state of "ihraam". The specific location depends on the direction the pilgrim is coming from. In general, miqaat is the place and/or time when an action becomes due.

The adjective would be mawqut موقوت or mu`aqqat مؤقت. Here are references from the Glorious Quran:

"إن الصلاة كانت على المؤمنين كتابا موقوتا"
"وإِذا الرسلُ أُقِّتَتْ"

Now mu`aqqat has the connotation of "postponed", so mawqut fits better in your context.

For payment, you could either use tasdid تسديد or duf'ah دُفعة. I chose tasdid since duf'ah is closer to the meaning of "installment", which is still not too far off.

With this, your phrase becomes (of course the infliction changes with the sentence):

tasdidun mawqut تسديد موقوت
duf'atun mawqutah دفعة موقوتة

You also have another alternative for mawqut, which is maw'ud موعود. The noun in this case is ميعاد, which means "the appointed time and/or place". For example:

"صبرا آل ياسر فإن موعدكم الجنة".

and "ard almi'aad أرض الميعاد", the land promised to the children of Ibrahim if they are keep their covenant.

Hope this helps,

Alaa Zeineldine




    muhit almuhit, lisan al-araab, Quran and Sunnah.
Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 20:21
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 602
Grading comment
Many thanks to Fuad and Zeineldine. I think "marhala" and "tasdeed marhali" more suitable though not precise. Thanks again.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 4 hrs
Aknowledgement


Explanation:
The answer chosen for the term was marhala, which was suggested by Fuad.

Although the phrase tasdeed marhali is a combination of both our suggestions, I should acknowledge that the points should have gone to Fuad not me.

Alaa Zeineldine

Alaa Zeineldine
Egypt
Local time: 20:21
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 602
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search