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Dizziness / Lightheadedness

Arabic translation: دوار

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Dizziness / Lightheadedness
Arabic translation:دوار
Entered by: Shazly
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16:23 Oct 30, 2005
English to Arabic translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / Symptoms
English term or phrase: Dizziness / Lightheadedness
I am under the impression that they are one and the same thing. They both appear in a list (not consecutively) so I feel I have to translate both. Now, "Dawar" is not an option because in a medical context, it can only mean "vertigo". My translation for both words is: "Dawkha". Please help me find another.
Yasser El Helw
Local time: 20:46
دوار
Explanation:
أو دوخة
also vertigo= دوار أو دوخة

vertigo is a sensation of whirling and loss of balance, caused by looking down from a great height or by disease affecting the inner ear or the vestibular nerve.

example: sham-movement vertigo= دُوارٌ حَرَكِيٌّ كاذِب
Selected response from:

Shazly
Egypt
Local time: 20:46
Grading comment
I do not like the answer but thanks for your effort.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
1 +5دوار
Shazly
5دوار / دوخة
Fuad Yahya


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +5
دوار


Explanation:
أو دوخة
also vertigo= دوار أو دوخة

vertigo is a sensation of whirling and loss of balance, caused by looking down from a great height or by disease affecting the inner ear or the vestibular nerve.

example: sham-movement vertigo= دُوارٌ حَرَكِيٌّ كاذِب

Shazly
Egypt
Local time: 20:46
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic
PRO pts in category: 98
Grading comment
I do not like the answer but thanks for your effort.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexander Yeltsov
41 mins

agree  Fuad Yahya
1 hr

agree  ahmadwadan.com
2 hrs

agree  Ashraf Sada
2 days 24 mins

agree  loula_luv
10 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
dizziness / lightheadedness
دوار / دوخة


Explanation:
Dizziness (the generic term for various degrees and types of the same condition) consists of two distinct sensations: a feeling of whirling, and a feeling of falling. We call the first sensation دوار (pronounced DUWAR), and we call the other sensation دوخة (pronounced DOWKHA). The problem is that the two sensations occur together, hence the common interchangeableness.

DUWAR is an old Arabic term fashioned to fit the common standard nominal form for diagnoses, e.g., ZUKAM, SUDA`, etc.

DOWKHA is derived from the verb داخ, which means to succumb or to fall under a greater power. The noun was forced upon standard Arabic by the genius of colloquial usage, which often comes to the rescue when the standard language fails to fill the gap.

"Vertigo" is just a Latinism preferred by some for dizziness. Etymologically, the term emphasizes the whirling sensation versus the falling sensation. Because of this etymology, doctors sometimes talk about "true vertigo," by which they mean the dizziness that occurs specifically as a result of the failure of the inner-ear mechanism that maintains steadiness and balance. This is by no means universal or definitive. Whenever I am confronted with a text where both "vertigo" and "dizziness" are used (and the text seems to make a distinction), I use دوام (pronounced DUWAM) for "vertigo." It means the same thing as DUWAR, but it gives the translator one more shade of color to use.

Lightheadedness, wooziness, giddiness, etc., are popular words used to describe the same condition, in a language that appeals to the common reader. These words typically describe less severe conditions, but not necessariy. When I am confronted with a text where both "dizziness" and "lightheadedness" are used (and the text seems to make a distinction), I use دوار for "dizziness" and دوخة for lightheadedness.

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Note added at 1 hr 56 mins (2005-10-30 18:19:57 GMT)
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This answer is not for grading. The answer given by Mr. Shazly is essentially correct. This is merely an expansion of the same answer.

Fuad Yahya
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 353
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