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Arabic translation: fee

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19:54 Oct 24, 2001
English to Arabic translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: in
adjective
Cortni
Arabic translation:fee
Explanation:
Unfortunately, I don't have Arabic fonts. This would be spelled fa-ya
Selected response from:

xxxeilema
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2feexxxeilema
5 +1fee , bixxxvalerian
5Fi vs Bi.
Rachel Alawy
5Fi فيNeveen El-Gamal
5Fi OR Fee فيMona Helal
4fee or beeyacine
4fee or beexxxAbu Amaal
4Fee OR BeMike Bandak


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
fee


Explanation:
Unfortunately, I don't have Arabic fonts. This would be spelled fa-ya


xxxeilema
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Fuad Yahya
3 days 21 hrs

agree  Neveen El-Gamal
5 days
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
fee , bi


Explanation:
sorry, but i cannot use arabic fonts on the internet. there are 2 variants: fee (fa + ya) or bi (ba + kesra). "bi" will be added to the following word.
good luck

xxxvalerian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nicola (Mr.) Nobili
3 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Fi OR Fee في


Explanation:
It is a preposition.

There is another preposition in Arabic that has the same meaning as 'in' in English and that is the letter ‘ب‘ which in English would sound like : 'bi' but the 'e' is very very short vowel.

So If you say: Born in Cairo: in Arabic you can either say:
Mawlood fi-L Qahira
Or
Mawlood Bi-L Qahira.

HTH.

Mona Helal
Local time: 17:01
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 397

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  yacine: As far as "fee"is concerned,in correct Arabic, you need two "e"s or two "i"s according to your mother tongue
2 hrs
  -> That's why I also put it in Arabic script. It's not easy to use Latin script to convey the exact Arabic pronunciation

agree  xxxeilema: Yacine is wrong. US academics would put a line over one "i" to signal a long vowel (which we don't all have the font for
9 hrs
  -> thank you amelie

agree  AhmedAMS
1 day 20 hrs
  -> thank you masters

disagree  Rachel Alawy: Explanation ran a little long, see below!
2 days 17 hrs
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10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Fi في


Explanation:
This is the main translation of the preposition but usually the translation depends on the sequence of the sentence.. it could have different expressions according to the meaning.

Neveen El-Gamal
Local time: 08:01

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxeilema: Why not simply agree with one of the preceding rather than putting the same answer for the 4th time?
2 hrs
  -> I thought I added something in my explanation which indicates the need to know the sequence of the sentence.
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23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Fee OR Be


Explanation:
Both ways are correct.

Mike Bandak
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1 day 8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
fee or bee


Explanation:
Can I play too?

I think there are still about 10 ways left to say this.



xxxAbu Amaal
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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2 days 20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Fi vs Bi.


Explanation:
"Mawlood Bi-L Qahira" Although Fi and Bi are exchangeable in different dialects this example is a very poor one, since Cairo was not used to deliver you ;) Especially in the Egyptian dialect people tend to use Fi more than Bi. Probably a Syrian would say: Khalqan beSh-Sham, "I was created (born) in Sham." To understand the difference between Bi and Fi consider: Akalto Bil-Mel'aqa (Akalto Fil-Mel'aqa --Not acceptable) which means I ate inside the spoon, rather than the former I ate with the spoon. Darabtouho Bil-'Asa, I beat him with a stick. You can not say, Darabtouho fil-'Asa, unless you’ve taken him inside the stick and beat him there. :)

Unless you’re translating a comic book, a dialect-dependent art work I believe you must use proper Arabic to translate.


Rachel Alawy
Egypt
Local time: 08:01
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
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8 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
fee or bee


Explanation:
as far as translitteration is concerned there is unfortunately no unified way of writing arabic with latin letters
hth
yacine


yacine
Local time: 07:01
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 51
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