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Lucky

Arabic translation: مُوَفَّقة أو سَـعيدة

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Lucky
Arabic translation:مُوَفَّقة أو سَـعيدة
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
Options:
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10:20 Jan 3, 2002
English to Arabic translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Lucky
Name for a lucky person-female
Hidajete
مُوَفَّقة أو سَـعيدة
Explanation:
The two terms suggested above are pronounced MUWAFFAQA and SA"EEDA. The relevance of these terms to your question is provided below.

1. Depending on the cultural context, the term you are looking for may be MUWAFFAQ. This is a term that is used by people of faith, who understand "luck" or "good fortune" not as mere coincidence or events, but as the result of purposeful guidance by a living, providential God. A "lucky" person in this conception is a person who has been divinely favored for a divine purpose. Such a person is called MUWAFFAQ (for males) or MUWAFFAQA (for females). Both are used as personal names. The noun TOWFEEQ is even more commonly used.

2. Another term for lucky or fortunate is SA"EED (male) or SA"EEDA (for females). Again, both are commonly used as personal names, and so are the parallel adjectives MAS"OOD and the noun SA"D and its plural forms SU"AD (for females) and SU"OOD (for males).

The term SA"EED is a bit confusing, because, like the English term "happy" has had a shift in meaning over the stretch of time. In older times, SA"EED, like "happy" was used to denote a felicitous or "fortunate" state of being. Today, most people use the term SA"EED (as well as the term "happy") to denote gladness or cheerfulness.

Fuad

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Note added at 2002-01-04 02:58:20 (GMT)
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As always, please forgive my typos above.
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3مُوَفَّقة أو سَـعيدةFuad Yahya
5 +1"Mahzouza"Amer al-Azem
4 +1Mas'oudahMona Helal
4 +1Mahdhoudah
Saleh Ayyub
4محظوظxxxsilas1964


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
محظوظ


Explanation:
محظوظ =lucky

xxxsilas1964
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
مُوَفَّقة أو سَـعيدة


Explanation:
The two terms suggested above are pronounced MUWAFFAQA and SA"EEDA. The relevance of these terms to your question is provided below.

1. Depending on the cultural context, the term you are looking for may be MUWAFFAQ. This is a term that is used by people of faith, who understand "luck" or "good fortune" not as mere coincidence or events, but as the result of purposeful guidance by a living, providential God. A "lucky" person in this conception is a person who has been divinely favored for a divine purpose. Such a person is called MUWAFFAQ (for males) or MUWAFFAQA (for females). Both are used as personal names. The noun TOWFEEQ is even more commonly used.

2. Another term for lucky or fortunate is SA"EED (male) or SA"EEDA (for females). Again, both are commonly used as personal names, and so are the parallel adjectives MAS"OOD and the noun SA"D and its plural forms SU"AD (for females) and SU"OOD (for males).

The term SA"EED is a bit confusing, because, like the English term "happy" has had a shift in meaning over the stretch of time. In older times, SA"EED, like "happy" was used to denote a felicitous or "fortunate" state of being. Today, most people use the term SA"EED (as well as the term "happy") to denote gladness or cheerfulness.

Fuad

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-04 02:58:20 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As always, please forgive my typos above.

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  shfranke
1 hr

agree  Jamal Mavrikios
3 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
30 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Mahdhoudah


Explanation:
Mahdhoudhah would be a suitable name for a lucky female.
Mowafaqah is a second alternative, but Mowafaqah does not necessarrily mean lucky... Mowafaqah would mean fortunate.


I agree with you Ahmed luck in its own context means Hadh or Haz and ultimately lucky means Mahzouz or Mahdhoudh for males and Mahzouza or Mahdhoudha for females.
The word lucky carries a probabilistic meaning and achieving the targets easily and with a minimum trial and effort. Lucky does not necessarily mean Muwafaq, as Muwafaq usually used for referring to the person of being fortunate; and this does not entail the probabilistic side of it nor of achieving the target easily.


Saleh Ayyub
New Zealand
Local time: 08:56
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 953

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
30 days
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15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"Mahzouza"


Explanation:
The Last syllable could have pronouciations :"Mahfoudha","Mahfouththa" or Mahfouza. One ends with "dh", the other with double"tha" and the last with "za". Mahfoutha is the standard written name but the other ones are the most likely spoken names. The "th" and "dh" sounds are voiced consonants where "za" sound is a devoiced one. People who are categorized as educated and high classed ones would say "Mahfouza" and even women tend to speak and use elite and elegant words.People of the city would also use this word whereas the other two are to be used in rural areas.! So i would prefer this name for lucky.

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Note added at 2002-01-04 01:46:02 (GMT)
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3 prounciations

Amer al-Azem
Local time: 22:56
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic
PRO pts in pair: 88

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
29 days
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21 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Mas'oudah


Explanation:
In Arabic it looks like this:
مسعوده
Which means the lucky one (a female).
I have a friend of mine whose name is Masouda (Mas'oudah) who tells me that it is not only an Arabic name but a Japanese name.

For a male it would be: Mas'oud = مسعود = the lucky one.


HTH

Mona Helal
Local time: 06:56
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 397

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
29 days
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