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Very good

Arabic translation: بخير، تمام، عال

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Very good
Arabic translation:بخير، تمام، عال
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

23:07 Jan 8, 2002
English to Arabic translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: Very good
Hello. How are you?
Very good.
christina
mumtaaz
Explanation:
can also apply to something (masc.) that is very good. Mumtaaza= feminine
Selected response from:

John Kinory
Local time: 01:21
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2mumtaazJohn Kinory
4 +2BIKHAIR بخيرFuad Yahya
4 +1جيد جداً - عال العالMona Helal
4In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.
4In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.
4In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.
4In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.
4In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
mumtaaz


Explanation:
can also apply to something (masc.) that is very good. Mumtaaza= feminine

John Kinory
Local time: 01:21
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Mona Helal: mumtaaz means excellent not very good.
3 hrs
  -> So? Aren't you being too picky? 'Neutral' would have sufficed, since you seem to agree that the phrase itself is appropriate

agree  Sue Goldian
16 hrs
  -> ta :-)

agree  Dana Cohen
20 hrs
  -> ta:-)

agree  dasheed6
1 day 10 hrs
  -> Thanks :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.


Explanation:
Greetings.

in the context of that exchange of social pleasantries, some appropriate responses might include (and depending on region):

o bikhair, alHamdullilah

o jaid

o tamaam

o tamaam 3la maa yuraam

o kwaiss (mostly in Egypt and Sudan)

Please note that each response is customarily preceded or followed by the religious evocation (even by non-Muslims) "al-Hamdulillah" or "al-Hamdulillah wa lahuh al-shukr"

While there are some other replies, these seem to be among the most commonly-used responses.

HTH. Khair, in sha' Allah.

Regards from Los Angeles,

Stephen H. Franke




    Field notes on Arabic dialects and colloquialisms

Native speaker of:

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.


Explanation:
Greetings.

in the context of that exchange of social pleasantries, some appropriate responses might include (and depending on region):

o bikhair, alHamdullilah

o jaid

o tamaam

o tamaam 3la maa yuraam

o kwaiss (mostly in Egypt and Sudan)

Please note that each response is customarily preceded or followed by the religious evocation (even by non-Muslims) "al-Hamdulillah" or "al-Hamdulillah wa lahuh al-shukr"

While there are some other replies, these seem to be among the most commonly-used responses.

HTH. Khair, in sha' Allah.

Regards from Los Angeles,

Stephen H. Franke




    Field notes on Arabic dialects and colloquialisms

Native speaker of:

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.


Explanation:
Greetings.

in the context of that exchange of social pleasantries, some appropriate responses might include (and depending on region):

o bikhair, alHamdullilah

o jaid

o tamaam

o tamaam 3la maa yuraam

o kwaiss (mostly in Egypt and Sudan)

Please note that each response is customarily preceded or followed by the religious evocation (even by non-Muslims) "al-Hamdulillah" or "al-Hamdulillah wa lahuh al-shukr"

While there are some other replies, these seem to be among the most commonly-used responses.

HTH. Khair, in sha' Allah.

Regards from Los Angeles,

Stephen H. Franke




    Field notes on Arabic dialects and colloquialisms

Native speaker of:

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.


Explanation:
Greetings.

in the context of that exchange of social pleasantries, some appropriate responses might include (and depending on region):

o bikhair, alHamdullilah

o jaid

o tamaam

o tamaam 3la maa yuraam

o kwaiss (mostly in Egypt and Sudan)

Please note that each response is customarily preceded or followed by the religious evocation (even by non-Muslims) "al-Hamdulillah" or "al-Hamdulillah wa lahuh al-shukr"

While there are some other replies, these seem to be among the most commonly-used responses.

HTH. Khair, in sha' Allah.

Regards from Los Angeles,

Stephen H. Franke




    Field notes on Arabic dialects and colloquialisms

Native speaker of:

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
In that context (social ritual): "bikhair" and others.


Explanation:
Greetings.

in the context of that exchange of social pleasantries, some appropriate responses might include (and depending on region):

o bikhair, alHamdullilah

o jaid

o tamaam

o tamaam 3la maa yuraam

o kwaiss (mostly in Egypt and Sudan)

Please note that each response is customarily preceded or followed by the religious evocation (even by non-Muslims) "al-Hamdulillah" or "al-Hamdulillah wa lahuh al-shukr"

While there are some other replies, these seem to be among the most commonly-used responses.

HTH. Khair, in sha' Allah.

Regards from Los Angeles,

Stephen H. Franke




    Field notes on Arabic dialects and colloquialisms

Native speaker of:

31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
BIKHAIR بخير


Explanation:
As you can imagine, there are many different ways to say, "I am well, thank you" in response to "how are you." That is the case in all languages, and Arabic is no exception.

BIKHAIR is an all time favorite of mine. The KH combination sounds like the CH combination in German, as in "Buch" or "Bach." The stress is on the last syllable. The word rhymes with "hair."

Most people I know round off their response with the phrase "ALHAMDU LILLAH," which means, "praise God," mostly understood as "thank God."

Fuad

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Raghad
20 hrs

agree  dasheed6
1 day 9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
جيد جداً - عال العال


Explanation:
Transliterated as:
Jayyed Jeddan

This is the literal translation of 'very good' and this can be used in grading marks ..etc.

However in reply to 'how are you?' you can not just say 'Jayyed Jeddan' because you have to qualify what is 'Jayyed Jeddan' such as your health or your feelings or your status ..etc. What I suggest you say is:
صحتي جيدة جداً
SeHatti Jayyeda Jeddan (my health is very good)
OR
حالي جيد جداً
Hali Jayyed Jeddan (my overall being/status is very good)

In Egypt they use a colloquial term which would be spot-on in this situation. The one I am talking about is:
عال العال
'AAl El-'AAl (top of the world - the best there is)

HTH

Mona Helal
Local time: 12:21
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 397

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  dasheed6
1 day 6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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