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Nuer Sudanese

Arabic translation: النوير

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Nuer Sudanese
Arabic translation:النوير
Entered by: Mona Helal
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00:15 May 31, 2001
English to Arabic translations [PRO]
English term or phrase: Nuer Sudanese
It is supposed to be a dialect of the Arabic language. Has anyone heard of it? and if so, is it very different of the literal Arabic?
Mona
Not a dialect of the Arabic language
Explanation:
Dear Mona,

Nuer people who live in Sudan do speak Nuer (not "Nuer Sudanese"), which is not related to Arabic, a language of the Semitic group, related to the Chamitic one. Nuer pertains to the Nilotic group (see detailed information below).

You will found a lot of useful information on the Web, like the following (from http://www.sil.org/ethnologue/countries/Suda.html):

NUER (NAATH, NAADH) [NUS] 740,000 in Sudan (1982 SIL); including 2,935 Western Jikany, 12,500 Lou, 1,100 Nyuong, 2,500 Thiang, 5,900 Bul, 2,400 Jagai, 6,700 Laak, 4,900 Leik, 1,600 Door, 17,600 Eastern Jikany (1977 Voegelin and Voegelin); 40,000 in Ethiopia (1982 UBS); 840,000 in all countries (1990 UBS). Southern Sudan, east Upper Nile Province, in the region of Nasir on the upper Sobat River, in and around a triangle formed between Bahr el Zeraf and Bahr el Jebel, and extending up the Sobat River across the Ethiopian border. Nilo-Saharan, Eastern Sudanic, Nilotic, Western, Dinka-Nuer, Nuer. Dialects: DOR (DOOR), EASTERN JIKANY (JIKAIN, JEKAING), ABIGAR, WESTERN JIKANY, CIEN, THOGNAATH, LOU (LAU), NYUONG, THIANG (BUL, GAWAAR, JAGAI, LAAK, LEIK). Dialects correspond mainly to geographic divisions. They call themselves 'Naath'. Severe disruption in residence patterns caused by fighting in Sudan and Ethiopia. Many are refugees or homeless (1991). Plains. Pastoralists: cattle; fishermen. Traditional religion, Christian. NT 1968. Bible portions 1935-1968.

As far as Arabic is concerned, they classify it as "Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic".

B'hatzlacha, Good luck, J.M.
Selected response from:

Jeremias MARSCHALIK
Local time: 15:15
Grading comment
Shukran thank you.
Thank you also to Fuad for providing other relevant links.
Mona
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1More on Nuer and other non-Arab languages of Sudanshfranke
na +1النُوَيرFuad Yahya
na +1Not a dialect of the Arabic languageJeremias MARSCHALIK


  

Answers


2 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Not a dialect of the Arabic language


Explanation:
Dear Mona,

Nuer people who live in Sudan do speak Nuer (not "Nuer Sudanese"), which is not related to Arabic, a language of the Semitic group, related to the Chamitic one. Nuer pertains to the Nilotic group (see detailed information below).

You will found a lot of useful information on the Web, like the following (from http://www.sil.org/ethnologue/countries/Suda.html):

NUER (NAATH, NAADH) [NUS] 740,000 in Sudan (1982 SIL); including 2,935 Western Jikany, 12,500 Lou, 1,100 Nyuong, 2,500 Thiang, 5,900 Bul, 2,400 Jagai, 6,700 Laak, 4,900 Leik, 1,600 Door, 17,600 Eastern Jikany (1977 Voegelin and Voegelin); 40,000 in Ethiopia (1982 UBS); 840,000 in all countries (1990 UBS). Southern Sudan, east Upper Nile Province, in the region of Nasir on the upper Sobat River, in and around a triangle formed between Bahr el Zeraf and Bahr el Jebel, and extending up the Sobat River across the Ethiopian border. Nilo-Saharan, Eastern Sudanic, Nilotic, Western, Dinka-Nuer, Nuer. Dialects: DOR (DOOR), EASTERN JIKANY (JIKAIN, JEKAING), ABIGAR, WESTERN JIKANY, CIEN, THOGNAATH, LOU (LAU), NYUONG, THIANG (BUL, GAWAAR, JAGAI, LAAK, LEIK). Dialects correspond mainly to geographic divisions. They call themselves 'Naath'. Severe disruption in residence patterns caused by fighting in Sudan and Ethiopia. Many are refugees or homeless (1991). Plains. Pastoralists: cattle; fishermen. Traditional religion, Christian. NT 1968. Bible portions 1935-1968.

As far as Arabic is concerned, they classify it as "Afro-Asiatic, Semitic, Central, South, Arabic".

B'hatzlacha, Good luck, J.M.


    Reference: http://www.sil.org/ethnologue/countries/Suda.html
Jeremias MARSCHALIK
Local time: 15:15
Native speaker of: Native in HebrewHebrew
PRO pts in pair: 6
Grading comment
Shukran thank you.
Thank you also to Fuad for providing other relevant links.
Mona

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Fuad Yahya: One of the best answers I have read on ProZ
17 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
236 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
النُوَير


Explanation:
Here is an Arabic reference to the Nuer language:

http://www.fikrahprojects.com/wreen/maps/africa/sudan-10.htm

السودان
السكان
تعداد السكان: 32.594.128 عام 1997
اللغات: العربية والنوبية والدينكا والنوير وباري ولاتوكا والإنجليزية


"Nuer" is originally a name of a tribal group. Here is an Arabic reference to the Nuer tribes:

http://www.sudanow.com/arabic/Economic/AnimalReso/a_shepherd...

الرعي والرعاة في السودان
الرعاة والقبائل الرعوية
كما يمكن تقسيم القبائل الرعوية حسب أنواع الحيوانات التي يربونها إلى
ج- المجموعة النيلية : ويربون الأبقار و الماعز وأشهرهم:- الدينكا ،الشلك ،النوير، التبوسا


In his excellent answer, Jirmejahu raised an interesting question: Is it "Nuer" or "Nuer Sudanese"?

The standard name is "Nuer," but language names are often entangled in identity politics. Witness for instance how the fragmentation of former Yugoslavia has affected how people now refer to Balkan languages. Likewise, for transparent political reasons, Nuer has been referred to as the "Sudanese" language, especially by Christian evangelical groups. In some cases, the terms "Nuer" and "Sudanese" are used together in a variety of ways, most commonly "Nuer (Sudanese)" and "Sudanese (Nuer)". Here is an excerpt using both formulas in the same page:

http://www.mcedservices.com/family.html

"Multi-Cultural Educational Services
Health Education Materials Store
Family Planning in English with Russian, Bosnian, Sudanese (Nuer), and Spanish translation
Translation from English to African languages: Somali, Nuer (Sudanese)"

And here is an excerpt that uses the formula "Nuer/Sudanese":

http://www.rm.lcms.org/church-pages/saltlakecity-stjohn.htm

"St. John Lutheran Church
Sunday Worship: 9:00 a.m. (English)
12:30 p.m. (Nuer/Sudanese)"


When the term "Nuer Sudanese" is used, it is usually a reference to the Sudanese people who speak the language, contrasted with Sudanese who do not or with non-Sudanese who do, as in the following excerpt:

http://www.nwc-cov.org/sudan/namiss.htm

"Some of the first arrivals in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, were befriended by the Evangelical Covenant Church (now Prairie Hills Covenant Church). First worshiping with the English church, the number grew in size so that a separate, Nuer- language service was added.

In their concern for their Nuer Sudanese people and their love for their new-found Covenant home, they began to encourage other groups to find the local Covenant Church. Soon other groups of Sudanese began to meet in various cities.

There is also a new congregation forming in Rochester, Minnesota, which is the first among non-Nuer Sudanese."


As Jirmejahu clarified, Nuer has nothing to do with Arabic.

Fuad



    See citations above
Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
236 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day 8 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
More on Nuer and other non-Arab languages of Sudan


Explanation:
Greetings to all in this thread / tahaiya tayyiba wa b3ad...
تحية طيبة وبعد...

May I add to the very informative previous responses by my ProZ.com colleagues about the Nuer people (of Sudan and Kenya) and their newly-established communities in the U.S. (located mostly in MN, ND and southern California).

The following comments apply to the implicit next phase of this post in ProZ.com: what about the Nuer language and what about the feasability and technical aspects of translating into or from that language.

Based on some printed materials (schedules of church services, prayers, short sermons, and community information brochures) provided from several sources, the Nuer and Dinka populations in the U.S. use a special (convoluted and symbol-congested) version of English IPA for translations into their respective languages.

Missionaries in Sudan and Kenya apparently developed and standardized those alphabets, the results of considerable years of extensive field research.

FWIW, some language services/translation agencies recently contacted me (although I am a translator for Arabic, Kurdish and Farsi) to undertake some into-Dinka and into-Nuer translations (social services or public health subjects).

Their comments indicated that their clients had no idea about the complexity of working into each languageg and the difficulty of finding qualified (and IPA-competent) bidi translators.

While there are some Nuer and Dinka translators now available in the U.S., U.K. and Canada (IIRC), they are few in number and limited in capability (in terms of having extensive English vocabularies beyond basic/social subject areas). Accordingly, translations involving Nuer/Dinka et al can be done, but the production process is definitely not simple, cheap or fast.

Hope this helps.

Khair, in sha' Allah... خير إن شاء الله

Regards from Los Angeles,

Stephen H. Franke

e-mail: < mutarjm@aol.com >




    Field notes, SIL materials (Khartoum, 1979)
    local sources, SNR back issues
shfranke
United States
Local time: 06:15
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 336

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  AhmedAMS
235 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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