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grandmother

Arabic translation: جدة

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:grandmother
Arabic translation:جدة
Entered by: Fuad Yahya
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21:07 Aug 28, 2001
English to Arabic translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: grandmother
paternal grandmother
Krystal
جدة
Explanation:
Pronounced: JADDA

The term works for both sides of the family.

If the term is to be used as a form of address, you would say JADDATI (my gandmother).

Regional terms of endearment for grandmothers are interesting to learn. In my town (in Eastern Saudi Arabia) most people use HABBABA, not very different from the Sudanese HABBOBA. Both terms mean "beloved". A less sentimental term is UMMI AL-'ODA ("my elder mother"). In the Eastern Mediterranean region, the common term is SITTY ("my lady"). In Iraq, the term BIBEETI is common, and is supposed to be baby-talk for "my belved". For some odd reason, my paternal grandmother made us use that term when addressing her, which we did until she died. It was a source of unending embarrassment for us. On the other hand, we addressed my maternal grandmother simply as UMMAH ("mom"). When speking about her to others, we would simply say, UMMI UMM YOOSIF, to make it clear we were not talking about our immediate mother.

I'd better stop here before this gets out of hand.

Fuad
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2جدةFuad Yahya
na +1جدة Jadda, with a stress on D, as used in Modern Standard ArabicMutarjim97
naGedda جدةNeveen El-Gamal
najadda, umm al ummyacine


  

Answers


20 mins peer agreement (net): +2
جدة


Explanation:
Pronounced: JADDA

The term works for both sides of the family.

If the term is to be used as a form of address, you would say JADDATI (my gandmother).

Regional terms of endearment for grandmothers are interesting to learn. In my town (in Eastern Saudi Arabia) most people use HABBABA, not very different from the Sudanese HABBOBA. Both terms mean "beloved". A less sentimental term is UMMI AL-'ODA ("my elder mother"). In the Eastern Mediterranean region, the common term is SITTY ("my lady"). In Iraq, the term BIBEETI is common, and is supposed to be baby-talk for "my belved". For some odd reason, my paternal grandmother made us use that term when addressing her, which we did until she died. It was a source of unending embarrassment for us. On the other hand, we addressed my maternal grandmother simply as UMMAH ("mom"). When speking about her to others, we would simply say, UMMI UMM YOOSIF, to make it clear we were not talking about our immediate mother.

I'd better stop here before this gets out of hand.

Fuad

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7167
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alaa Zeineldine
10 hrs

agree  AhmedAMS
34 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
jadda, umm al umm


Explanation:
i prefer the first one as it renders exactly the english term
yacine


yacine
Local time: 13:37
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 51
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
جدة Jadda, with a stress on D, as used in Modern Standard Arabic


Explanation:
If you are using a regional word, you might want to check the relevant dilects, but it is safe to use Jadda, understood by all.

All the best

Mounaim

Mutarjim97
United States
Local time: 07:37
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 10

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Safaa Roumani
59 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 days 11 hrs
Gedda جدة


Explanation:
The Egyptian pronounciation for grandma, and it's the same for both sides..

Neveen El-Gamal
Local time: 14:37
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