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Rheon machine

Danish translation: Rheon maskine

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Rheon machine
Danish translation:Rheon maskine
Entered by: Sven Petersson
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05:13 Oct 11, 2001
English to Danish translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
English term or phrase: Rheon machine
Piping of fillings through co-extrusion in biscuits
Kate Persson
Denmark
Local time: 00:11
Rheon maskine
Explanation:
Rheon is proper name and should not be translated!

From references:

Filling a need
Filled cereal bars are the second type of bar in the grab-and-go snack-bar category. These bars are typically characterized by a thick, fruit-flavored paste surrounded by a soft, cake-like cookie dough containing varying levels of grains.
While all products have their formulation and processing secrets, Brian Strauss, head of experimental baking at the American Institute of Baking, Manhattan, KS, explains some general similarities that apply to the manufacturing of these bars. "The first stage is mixing; that is typically done in a horizontal mixer with a sigma bar configuration. The sigma blade contributes good blending of the ingredients in the shortest amount of time with the least amount of energy going into the dough. It is important to just incorporate the ingredients together rather than work it like a bread dough."
The equipment choices for making filled cereal bars vary. Typically, manufacturers use a two- or four-roll extruder (similar to a wire-cut machine) or a Rheon machine specifically designed for this type of product. They extrude the dough at the same time a filling is extruded into its center. "If the bar is to have sealed edges, a process called cold cutting, using a blunt knife, crimps and seals the edge of the dough around the filling portion before the product is baked," says Strauss. "Bars with open ends are typically cut after the baking process to prevent problems with filling boil-out." Baking typically requires a continuous-band oven.
New machine is Rheon's bread and butter

By Catrine Johansson
For Irvine World News
Most bread eaters have probably never heard of Rheon.
But chances are, Rheon machines have made the breads at the local Vons or Corner Bakery.
Rheon ­ a Japanese company ­ used to be known for its pastry dough machines, but has gradually inched its way into the bread-making market.
That inching took a giant leap forward recently when Rheon employees unveiled the company's new bakery bread machine, which implements a system called Stress Free VM.
Rheon's first customer is its sister company, Orange Bakery.
Both companies have their U.S. headquarters in the Irvine Spectrum, and the first new bread bakery machine line is housed in Orange Bakery's newly opened fourth plant, at 75 Parker, off of Toledo and Bake Parkway.
The opening signified both Rheon's and Orange Bakery's move into high-end, natural bread baking.
"We have seen an increase in demand for natural bread without additives, but it's been very difficult for manufacturers to produce that kind of bread, because the technology hasn't been there to mass produce it," said Joe Galasso, senior director at Orange Bakery.
"The Rheon machine line gets us back to the old-fashioned way of making bread, that produces a high-moisture, and high quality bread without any additives."
The problem in the bakery community is that the machines are too hard on the dough. To compensate for that, chemicals are added, so that the bread maintains fluffiness and shape.
"The bakery community is very conservative," said Kiyo Kamiyama, president and general manager for Rheon USA, while pointing to a glass case where models of the old type of machine and the new machine were displayed.
"The same basic machinery has been used since World War II, even though the machinery doesn't get along well with the dough."
The old machine was about twice as big as the new one.
"Dough is a living thing," said Orange Bakery's Joe Galasso. "If we respect it from the beginning, and don't push it or crush it, we'll get better breads."
In the demonstration room, a robotic arm lifted a drum high above the machine and dumped a load of dough into it. The dough was so moist it was shiny, and not a speck of it was stuck to the drum.
The dough had been fermented for an hour or so. Fermented dough is sensitive.
The gentle movements of the Rheon machines can accommodate the sensitivity, rendering the chemicals used in the old system obsolete.
Slowly, the machine massaged the dough into a flat ribbon that rolled out on a conveyer belt.
A rolling wheel cut the dough into two smaller ribbons.
"One of the major issues in bakeries today is keeping a consistency of the weight," said Rheon's Kamiyama. "Our new system has a computer that continuously weighs the dough and sensors that ensure it's cut correctly."
Next, the dough was flattened and rolled.
The flat sheets of dough went under three sets of metal curtains that forced the sheets into a roll.
The metal curtains were heavy.
"We can add or subtract steel rods depending on what kind of bread we're using," said Jon Thomson, director of sales at Rheon.
Heavy breads such as pumpernickel or rye require the heaviest curtains, while light breads such as white bread require light curtains.
Getting rid of gas is also an important part of the process. The gas is formed during fermentation, and is what gives the bread its fluffiness. But left in the bread, it also creates holes.
The gentle massaging of the dough in Rheon's new machine presses the gas out of the dough.
"If you're going to have a jelly sandwich, you don't want holes in the bread that cause the jelly to end up on your hands," Thomson said.
Once the dough loaves are rolled into the pans, a machine operator put the pans in the oven.
Onlookers at the demonstration moved to another room where samples were spread out on a table.
Rye breads, molasses breads, multi-grain bread, and poppy seed breads were thinly sliced, ready for tasting.
The slices depicted even, airy bread ­ with no holes. They didn't even break under hard butter.
"This kind of bread takes longer to make, but its quality is higher and it tastes better," Thomson said.
Selected response from:

Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 00:11
Grading comment
Sven, your a genius
Kate
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4Rheon maskine
Sven Petersson


  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Rheon maskine


Explanation:
Rheon is proper name and should not be translated!

From references:

Filling a need
Filled cereal bars are the second type of bar in the grab-and-go snack-bar category. These bars are typically characterized by a thick, fruit-flavored paste surrounded by a soft, cake-like cookie dough containing varying levels of grains.
While all products have their formulation and processing secrets, Brian Strauss, head of experimental baking at the American Institute of Baking, Manhattan, KS, explains some general similarities that apply to the manufacturing of these bars. "The first stage is mixing; that is typically done in a horizontal mixer with a sigma bar configuration. The sigma blade contributes good blending of the ingredients in the shortest amount of time with the least amount of energy going into the dough. It is important to just incorporate the ingredients together rather than work it like a bread dough."
The equipment choices for making filled cereal bars vary. Typically, manufacturers use a two- or four-roll extruder (similar to a wire-cut machine) or a Rheon machine specifically designed for this type of product. They extrude the dough at the same time a filling is extruded into its center. "If the bar is to have sealed edges, a process called cold cutting, using a blunt knife, crimps and seals the edge of the dough around the filling portion before the product is baked," says Strauss. "Bars with open ends are typically cut after the baking process to prevent problems with filling boil-out." Baking typically requires a continuous-band oven.
New machine is Rheon's bread and butter

By Catrine Johansson
For Irvine World News
Most bread eaters have probably never heard of Rheon.
But chances are, Rheon machines have made the breads at the local Vons or Corner Bakery.
Rheon ­ a Japanese company ­ used to be known for its pastry dough machines, but has gradually inched its way into the bread-making market.
That inching took a giant leap forward recently when Rheon employees unveiled the company's new bakery bread machine, which implements a system called Stress Free VM.
Rheon's first customer is its sister company, Orange Bakery.
Both companies have their U.S. headquarters in the Irvine Spectrum, and the first new bread bakery machine line is housed in Orange Bakery's newly opened fourth plant, at 75 Parker, off of Toledo and Bake Parkway.
The opening signified both Rheon's and Orange Bakery's move into high-end, natural bread baking.
"We have seen an increase in demand for natural bread without additives, but it's been very difficult for manufacturers to produce that kind of bread, because the technology hasn't been there to mass produce it," said Joe Galasso, senior director at Orange Bakery.
"The Rheon machine line gets us back to the old-fashioned way of making bread, that produces a high-moisture, and high quality bread without any additives."
The problem in the bakery community is that the machines are too hard on the dough. To compensate for that, chemicals are added, so that the bread maintains fluffiness and shape.
"The bakery community is very conservative," said Kiyo Kamiyama, president and general manager for Rheon USA, while pointing to a glass case where models of the old type of machine and the new machine were displayed.
"The same basic machinery has been used since World War II, even though the machinery doesn't get along well with the dough."
The old machine was about twice as big as the new one.
"Dough is a living thing," said Orange Bakery's Joe Galasso. "If we respect it from the beginning, and don't push it or crush it, we'll get better breads."
In the demonstration room, a robotic arm lifted a drum high above the machine and dumped a load of dough into it. The dough was so moist it was shiny, and not a speck of it was stuck to the drum.
The dough had been fermented for an hour or so. Fermented dough is sensitive.
The gentle movements of the Rheon machines can accommodate the sensitivity, rendering the chemicals used in the old system obsolete.
Slowly, the machine massaged the dough into a flat ribbon that rolled out on a conveyer belt.
A rolling wheel cut the dough into two smaller ribbons.
"One of the major issues in bakeries today is keeping a consistency of the weight," said Rheon's Kamiyama. "Our new system has a computer that continuously weighs the dough and sensors that ensure it's cut correctly."
Next, the dough was flattened and rolled.
The flat sheets of dough went under three sets of metal curtains that forced the sheets into a roll.
The metal curtains were heavy.
"We can add or subtract steel rods depending on what kind of bread we're using," said Jon Thomson, director of sales at Rheon.
Heavy breads such as pumpernickel or rye require the heaviest curtains, while light breads such as white bread require light curtains.
Getting rid of gas is also an important part of the process. The gas is formed during fermentation, and is what gives the bread its fluffiness. But left in the bread, it also creates holes.
The gentle massaging of the dough in Rheon's new machine presses the gas out of the dough.
"If you're going to have a jelly sandwich, you don't want holes in the bread that cause the jelly to end up on your hands," Thomson said.
Once the dough loaves are rolled into the pans, a machine operator put the pans in the oven.
Onlookers at the demonstration moved to another room where samples were spread out on a table.
Rye breads, molasses breads, multi-grain bread, and poppy seed breads were thinly sliced, ready for tasting.
The slices depicted even, airy bread ­ with no holes. They didn't even break under hard butter.
"This kind of bread takes longer to make, but its quality is higher and it tastes better," Thomson said.


    Reference: http://irvineworldnews.com/Bstories/feb22/rheon.html
    Reference: http://www.foodproductdesign.com/archive/1999/0999de.html
Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 672
Grading comment
Sven, your a genius
Kate
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