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DWW

Dutch translation: Niet tot ook zij tegengehouden worden louter omdat zij blank zijn

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:DWW
Dutch translation:Niet tot ook zij tegengehouden worden louter omdat zij blank zijn
Entered by: Evert DELOOF-SYS
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09:14 Sep 5, 2001
English to Dutch translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
English term or phrase: DWW
Dit zegt een iemand met een zwarte huidkleur over de situatie met blanken.
"Nothing is going to change. Not till their (blanken) momma's start working in our kitchens. Not till they start getting pulled over for a DWW."

Antwoord: "Driving While White. Good.

Kan iemand me hiermee helpen? alvast bedankt.
Sandra
Niet tot ook zij tegengehouden worden louter omdat zij blank zijn
Explanation:
Allusie op 'Driving While Black': veel Afro-Amerikanen worden door de politie tegengehouden louter omwille van hun huidskleur (cfr. ook hier worden bv. mensen van Noord-Afrikaanse oorsprong vlugger op het matje geroepen).

Veel meer uitleg hoeft hier eigenlijk niet.
Hieronder toch een resem voorbeelden gevonden via www.google.com (handig zo'n 'copy and paste' :))die aantonen dat 'DWB' al goed ingeburgerd is:


Driving While Black" Is Not a Crime...
So Why Are Incidents Like These Occurring
Across the Country?

Arizona - Phoenix

In December 1998, David Calvin James, 47, a tool-and-die maker with no criminal record, was jumped by the police who beat him with a flashlight and fists, and sprayed his face repeatedly with pepper spray. He was taken to jail, but released for lack of evidence. According to James' lawyer, Jamie McAlister, "His only sin was that he was in a drug area, walking alone and he was black." The severe beating cost James the use of his left arm and he has filed a lawsuit for damages against the Phoenix Police Department.

Source: Arizona Republic, January 5, 2000

On June 4, Larrel Riggs, a 42-year old marketing representative, was in his car driving to the Vine, a bar and restaurant in Scottsdale. He noticed a police car behind him as the car flashed its lights indicating for him to pull over. He did and proceeded to get out of the car, having no idea why he had been stopped. The officers approached his car with their hands on their weapons and instructed him to get back into the car. They demanded to see his driver's license and registration, keeping their hands on their guns the entire time. Riggs was alarmed at the police officers' actions who were treating this as a "high-level" criminal rather than a routine traffic stop. The officers eventually gave Riggs a citation for an illegible license plate and let him go after about half an hour.

(Originally reported in the Phoenix New Times on July 3, 1998.)

California - Oakland

Bill Durham of East Oakland spoke about his personal experiences with racial profiling at a community meeting at the Lake Merritt United Methodist Church recently. "My 18-year-old son is always being harassed and stopped by the police, and so are his friends." On one occasion, police officers told a group of young, black males to leave a bus stop. After one youth "didn't move fast enough, he was hit in the mouth by a police officer," Durham said.

On December 4, 1999 around midnight, Narvella Berthia and Sylvia James of Oakland had just dropped off a friend after a gospel concert at the Paramount Theater. The police stopped the women with guns drawn. "We were in a Lexus that they thought was stolen," Berthia reported at a community meeting. "Im still seeing a therapist because of that."

Source: Oakland Tribune, March 31, 2000

One evening in March, 1999, Keith Hamilton of East Oakland left a liquor store on MacArthur Boulevard and got in his car. He soon realized that he was being followed by a squad car, and after five blocks, he was pulled over. "They told me to get out of the car." Hamilton said that while one officer ran a check on his name and plates, the other officer searched his Mustang, rummaging through the glove compartment, under the seat and the trunk. "I see papers flying all over the place. He goes to the trunk of the car and pulls out the whole speaker box. Wires get ripped up." After completing the search and finding nothing, the police let him go without an apology.

Ray Marshall, an attorney from San Francisco, was stopped in 1997 as he crossed the Bay Bridge one night after work in his Mercedes. The officer told Marshall he hadn't made a complete stop at the intersection to the on-ramp. The officer then asked him a series of intrusive questions, which ranged from how long did he own the car to where he bought it, how much he paid for it, and where he lived. They were personal questions, "which I thought were disturbing and not relevant to whatever violation I might have committed," Marshall said. "It happens, in my estimation, on a regular basis to, if not yourself, a relative or someone that you know," Marshall said. "When it does happen you feel powerless. You don't want to have a confrontation that could escalate it, but at the same time there is a high level of frustration, guilt and resentment."

Source: San Francisco Examiner, March 27, 2000


California - San Diego

In October of 1997, San Diego Chargers football player Shawn Lee was pulled over, and he and his girlfriend were handcuffed and detained by police for half an hour on the side of Interstate 15. The officer said that Lee was stopped because he was driving a vehicle that fit the description of one stolen earlier that evening. However, Lee was driving a Jeep Cherokee, a sport utility vehicle, and the reportedly stolen vehicle was a Honda sedan.

(Originally published as "Driving While Black Examined in San Diego" in the San Diego Union Tribune on December 13, 1997.)

California - Santa Monica

Two officers in police cruisers, followed George Washington and Darryl Hicks, both African-American men, as they drove into the parking garage of the hotel where they were staying in Santa Monica. The men were ordered out of the car at gun point, handcuffed and placed in separate police cars while the officers searched their car and checked their identification. The police justified this detention because the men allegedly resembled a description of two suspects being sought for 19 armed robberies and one of the men seemed to be "nervous". The men filed suit against the officers and the court found that neither man fit the descriptions of the robbers, and that the robberies had not even occurred in the City of Santa Monica.

(Originally published in "United by Anger," by Andrea Ford in the Los Angeles Times on November 6, 1996.)

Florida

In the summer of 1998, an African American family's vacation got off to a bad start when two officers from the Nassau County Sheriff's Department in Florida pulled them over. The officers refused to tell John Tolbert why his family was pulled over. The Tolberts stood on the side of the highway as the officers "searched the inside (of) the car, they took all of our luggage out of the trunk placing it on the highway and search(ed) every piece, they open(ed) the hood of the car, search(ed) under the hood, they looked inside the filter under the hood, they searched the trunk, they took the back lights out (of) the car inside the trunk and search(ed) it." The officers called in another officer with a K-9 unit. No drugs were found. The officers continued to humiliate the Tolberts by searching them and making Mrs. Tolbert lift her t-shirt. Finally, after enduring this 2 hour stop, the officers issued John Tolbert a warning for weaving. Said Tolbert, "If I was a white man with his family, and said I was going on vacation as I told the officer, they never would have searched the car for two hours and embarrass and humiliate me and my family. I felt like we were not citizens of the United States."

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, November 1999

Last April, Aaron Campbell was pulled over by Orange County sheriff's deputies while on the Florida turnpike. The stop ended with him being wrestled to the ground, hit with pepper spray and arrested. It turned out that Campbell was a fellow police officer, a major with the Metro-Dade Police Department, and had identified himself as such when he was pulled over for an illegal lane change and having an obscured license tag.

(Originally published in "Police Profiling Goes on Trial" in the Washington Times on January 12, 1998.)

Illinois - Chicago

Dr. William Woods, an African American based at Lake Forest Hospital in Chicago, has been the victim of racial profiling on numerous occasions. During a hearing before the city council concerning the prevalence of racial profiling in Highland Park, a liberal North Shore suburb, Dr. Woods testified that, "Things got so bad I didn't want to leave the house at 2 a.m. to deliver a baby. I've been stopped several times, and once I had guns pulled on me en route to a music lesson."

Source: Chicago Sun-Times, January 11, 2000

Indiana - Carmel

Sgt. David Smith, an African-American police officer, was pulled over while driving an unmarked car in the City of Carmel. Sgt. Smith was wearing a full uniform at the time, but he was not wearing a hat which would have identified him as a police officer. According to a complaint filed with the ACLU, the trooper who stopped Smith appeared to be "shocked and surprised" when Sgt. Smith got out of the car. The trooper explained that he had stopped Smith because he had three antennas on the rear of his car and quickly left the scene.

(Originally published in "Making Traffic Stops Based on Race," by Sheila Kennedy in the Indianapolis Star on January 29, 1997. )


Indiana - Fort Wayne

More than 200 minorities have complained that local police in Fort Wayne, Indiana, routinely pull them over, screaming racial epithets, handcuffing, searching and otherwise harassing them.

(Originally published in "New traffic Offense: DWB," by Bonnie Blackburn in the Journal Gazette on January 12, 1997.)

Kansas - Wichita

Charles McAfee, president of the Wichita branch of the NAACP, testified before a state subcommittee that in 1994, he bought his daughter, Cheryl, a red Porsche. Once while visiting her grandmother in Wichita, the police pulled her over and had their guns drawn, asking her what she was doing in the neighborhood. McAfee said his daughter still talks about the time the police stopped her for nothing.

Maryland In January 2000, William Austin, an African American firefighter, endured a 2 hour search by ten officers from the Prince George County, Maryland police department and drug units. When an officer looked through Mr. Austin‚s wallet, he commented, "We got a drug dealing fireman." The officer then proceeded to handcuff Mr. Austin. The officers searched his truck, under the truck and the engine. A dog was repeatedly placed in the truck to sniff for drugs. Mr. Austin asked the officer what they were doing and was told to "Get on your f***in‚ knees." No drugs were found in Mr. Austin's truck.

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, January 2000

Maryland

In 1997, Charles and Etta Carter, an elderly African-American couple from Pennsylvania, were stopped by Maryland State Police on their 40th wedding anniversary. The troopers searched their car and brought in drug-sniffing dogs. During the course of the search, their daughter's wedding dress was tossed onto one of the police cars and, as trucks passed on I-95, it was blown to the ground. Ms. Carter was not allowed to use the restroom during the search because police officers feared that she would flee. Their belongings were strewn along the highway, trampled and urinated on by the dogs. No drugs were found and no ticket was issued by the state trooper. The Carter's eventually reached a settlement with the Maryland State Police.

(Originally published in "Race-Profiling Again Attacked," by Catherine Brennan in the Daily Record, Volume 212, No. 4).

Nelson Walker, a young Liberian man attending college in North Carolina, was driving along I-95 in Maryland when he was pulled over by state police who said he wasn't wearing a seatbelt. The officers detained him and his two passengers for two hours as they searched for illegal drugs, weapons, or other contraband. Finding nothing in the car, they proceeded to dismantle the car and removed part of a door panel, a seat panel and part of the sunroof. The officers found nothing and in the end handed Walker a screwdriver and said, "You're going to need this" as they left the scene.

(Originally published in "Raleigh Men Join Suit Against Maryland Police," by John Sullivan in the News & Observer on June 11, 1998.)

Gary D. Rodwell repeatedly refused to consent to a search of his vehicle when he was stopped for three hours on I-95. He said that the officer threatened to arrest him and called in a canine unit to search the vehicle. When no drugs were found, the officer accused Rodwell of lying, took his keys and called a tow truck to impound the Pontiac Bonneville Rodwell was driving. Rodwell had to pay the tow truck driver to get his car back.

(Originally published in "Plaintiffs Tell of Racial Bias by State Police in I-95 Stops," by Paula Lavigne in the Baltimore Sun on June 5, 1998.)

Robert Wilkins, a Harvard Law School graduate who is a public defender in Washington, DC, went to a family funeral in Ohio in May of 1992. On the return trip he was accompanied by his aunt and uncle and 29-year old cousin. The group rented a Cadillac for the trip home. The cousin was stopped for speeding in western-Maryland while driving 60 miles per hour on the interstate. The state trooper who stopped the car ordered everyone out so that it could be searched for drugs. The group was forced to stand on the side of the interstate in the rain for an extended period of time while officers and drug-sniffing dogs searched their car. Nothing was found. Wilkins filed suit with the ACLU and received a settlement from the state of Maryland.

(Originally published in "Driving While Black on 95" in The Washington Post on November 16, 1996.)

Michigan

LaDarriss Mixon, an African American male, was pulled over by a Michigan State Police Officer supposedly for speeding. While she checked his license and registration, another officer arrived on the scene. This officer asked LaDarriss if he had any "spiders or grenades." The officer then asked if he had any sharp objects in his pockets because he wanted "to go home to his wife and kids tonight."

They proceeded to search LaDarriss¹ vehicle. He was made to sit on the hood of the car with his back to the car not allowing him to see the search being conducted. A third officer arrived at the scene and wanted to know if LaDarriss had any drugs on him. Finally, he was given a speeding ticket that was eventually dismissed in court.

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, September 1999.

Missouri - St. Louis

Representative Russell Gunn (D-St. Louis County), who is a member of the House Black Caucus, says that all his life Missouri police have pulled him over for racial reasons. Several years ago he was pulled over near Jefferson City for going five miles over the speed limit. "I said to the officer, Œyou saw a black man driving a Cadillac and you decided to stop me until you found out I was a legislator.' ŒOh no, that's not so,' the officer said. I said, Œhow can you justify stopping me when other cars have passed you and I passed you and you stopped me?' He could not justify it," said Gunn.

Source: MSNBC News, March 16, 2000

The ACLU of Eastern Missouri has documented numerous cases of racial profiling in that state. For example, one African American military officer was stopped on I-44 for what the trooper claimed was a broken brake light. When the man showed that the brake light worked, the trooper then said he was pulled over for swerving into the next lane. After detaining and questioning him for some time, the man was released. Similarly, a black man who questioned being pulled over in South St. Louis was given no reason, pulled out of his car, handcuffed, and detained while the police searched his car and interrogated him about his personal life. After an hour, he was released without explanation.

Source: ACLU press release, February 24, 2000

Nebraska

On their way home from a family vacation, the Doe¹s were stopped for weaving by Nebraska police. An officer asked John Doe if he could search the vehicle. John refused. Due to incorrect information on the rental car agreement, the car was confiscated and the family was taken to a motel. The police went through their belongings and found prescription narcotics and a syringe. John and his wife Jane were questioned separately. While being interrogated, the police did not allow Jane to use the bathroom, despite having bladder problems. They threatened to take the children to foster care and told her that John told the police that they were engaged in illegal activity.

John was jailed for possession of methamphetamines and released on bond the next day. No charges were ever filed.

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, January 2000.

New Jersey

On April 23, four young men - three African-Americans and one Hispanic - in route to a basketball clinic in North Carolina, were shot after their van was stopped for speeding and suspected drug trafficking. The men contend that they were not speeding, but were stopped because of their race. The incident is still under investigation.

(Originally published in "The Offense: 'Driving While Black'," by Hugh B. Price in Crisis, July 1998)

New York

Collie Brown was driving from Albany to Bethlehem, with his young daughter asleep in the car, when he noticed that his headlights were dimming. He stopped the car and got out to see what was causing the problem. A Bethlehem police car pulled up behind him with it's lights flashing, and the officer asked if he needed any help. When Brown replied that he did not need any assistance, the officer told him to get behind the car and proceeded to handcuff him. The officer informed Brown that the car had been reported as stolen, which was true. Brown had reported the car stolen many months earlier after it had been hot-wired in front of his home in Albany. The Albany police had recovered the car a week after it was reported stolen. At no point was Brown ever asked for his registration or diver's license prior to being handcuffed in order to prove that the car did indeed belong to him. The officer eventually retrieved Brown's wallet from the car and discovered that the car did belong to him, and Brown was released.

(Originally published in "Black driver stopped for stealing - his own car," by Dan Lynch in the Albany Times Union on January 21, 1997.)

Pennsylvania

Jonny Gammage was pulled over while driving his cousin's Jaguar at 2 A.M. on October 12. As Gammage pulled over a total of five Brentwood police cars arrived on the scene. One of the officers said that Gammage ran three red lights before stopping after the officer flashed his lights at him. The officer ordered Gammage out of the car and saw him grab something that was reportedly a weapon, but in reality was just a cellular phone. The officer knocked the phone out of Gammage's hand and a scuffle followed. The other officers beat Gammage with a flashlight, a collapsible baton and a blackjack as one put his foot on Gammage's neck. Jonny Gammage died, handcuffed, ankles bound, facedown on the pavement shortly after the incident began. He was unarmed.

(Originally published in "Under Suspicion," by Thomas Fields-Meyer, et. al in People Magazine on January 15, 1996.)

South Carolina

Sen. Maggie Glover, a democrat from Florence, said her nephew was pulled over five times in two weeks simply for driving through a high crime area on his way to and from work. He was never charged with a crime.

Source: The State, March 10, 2000

Texas

On their way home from visiting family in Texas, Kevin Moore, an African American sales person and and Gwendolyn Moore, an African American computer specialist, were stopped by the local police. The officers accused the Moores of being drug traffickers because they "fit the profile" of a couple purchasing drugs for distribution. Kevin and Gwendolyn did not consent to a search, but the officers searched the car and Gwendolyn‚s purse anyway. They then brought out their dog to sniff the purse and their luggage. The dog did not find anything, Kevin and Gwendolyn were taken to the police station and endured another invasive search. Eventually, they were fined for not wearing seat belts.

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, January 2000.


HTH






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Evert DELOOF-SYS
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naNiet tot ook zij tegengehouden worden louter omdat zij blank zijn
Evert DELOOF-SYS


  

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22 mins
Niet tot ook zij tegengehouden worden louter omdat zij blank zijn


Explanation:
Allusie op 'Driving While Black': veel Afro-Amerikanen worden door de politie tegengehouden louter omwille van hun huidskleur (cfr. ook hier worden bv. mensen van Noord-Afrikaanse oorsprong vlugger op het matje geroepen).

Veel meer uitleg hoeft hier eigenlijk niet.
Hieronder toch een resem voorbeelden gevonden via www.google.com (handig zo'n 'copy and paste' :))die aantonen dat 'DWB' al goed ingeburgerd is:


Driving While Black" Is Not a Crime...
So Why Are Incidents Like These Occurring
Across the Country?

Arizona - Phoenix

In December 1998, David Calvin James, 47, a tool-and-die maker with no criminal record, was jumped by the police who beat him with a flashlight and fists, and sprayed his face repeatedly with pepper spray. He was taken to jail, but released for lack of evidence. According to James' lawyer, Jamie McAlister, "His only sin was that he was in a drug area, walking alone and he was black." The severe beating cost James the use of his left arm and he has filed a lawsuit for damages against the Phoenix Police Department.

Source: Arizona Republic, January 5, 2000

On June 4, Larrel Riggs, a 42-year old marketing representative, was in his car driving to the Vine, a bar and restaurant in Scottsdale. He noticed a police car behind him as the car flashed its lights indicating for him to pull over. He did and proceeded to get out of the car, having no idea why he had been stopped. The officers approached his car with their hands on their weapons and instructed him to get back into the car. They demanded to see his driver's license and registration, keeping their hands on their guns the entire time. Riggs was alarmed at the police officers' actions who were treating this as a "high-level" criminal rather than a routine traffic stop. The officers eventually gave Riggs a citation for an illegible license plate and let him go after about half an hour.

(Originally reported in the Phoenix New Times on July 3, 1998.)

California - Oakland

Bill Durham of East Oakland spoke about his personal experiences with racial profiling at a community meeting at the Lake Merritt United Methodist Church recently. "My 18-year-old son is always being harassed and stopped by the police, and so are his friends." On one occasion, police officers told a group of young, black males to leave a bus stop. After one youth "didn't move fast enough, he was hit in the mouth by a police officer," Durham said.

On December 4, 1999 around midnight, Narvella Berthia and Sylvia James of Oakland had just dropped off a friend after a gospel concert at the Paramount Theater. The police stopped the women with guns drawn. "We were in a Lexus that they thought was stolen," Berthia reported at a community meeting. "Im still seeing a therapist because of that."

Source: Oakland Tribune, March 31, 2000

One evening in March, 1999, Keith Hamilton of East Oakland left a liquor store on MacArthur Boulevard and got in his car. He soon realized that he was being followed by a squad car, and after five blocks, he was pulled over. "They told me to get out of the car." Hamilton said that while one officer ran a check on his name and plates, the other officer searched his Mustang, rummaging through the glove compartment, under the seat and the trunk. "I see papers flying all over the place. He goes to the trunk of the car and pulls out the whole speaker box. Wires get ripped up." After completing the search and finding nothing, the police let him go without an apology.

Ray Marshall, an attorney from San Francisco, was stopped in 1997 as he crossed the Bay Bridge one night after work in his Mercedes. The officer told Marshall he hadn't made a complete stop at the intersection to the on-ramp. The officer then asked him a series of intrusive questions, which ranged from how long did he own the car to where he bought it, how much he paid for it, and where he lived. They were personal questions, "which I thought were disturbing and not relevant to whatever violation I might have committed," Marshall said. "It happens, in my estimation, on a regular basis to, if not yourself, a relative or someone that you know," Marshall said. "When it does happen you feel powerless. You don't want to have a confrontation that could escalate it, but at the same time there is a high level of frustration, guilt and resentment."

Source: San Francisco Examiner, March 27, 2000


California - San Diego

In October of 1997, San Diego Chargers football player Shawn Lee was pulled over, and he and his girlfriend were handcuffed and detained by police for half an hour on the side of Interstate 15. The officer said that Lee was stopped because he was driving a vehicle that fit the description of one stolen earlier that evening. However, Lee was driving a Jeep Cherokee, a sport utility vehicle, and the reportedly stolen vehicle was a Honda sedan.

(Originally published as "Driving While Black Examined in San Diego" in the San Diego Union Tribune on December 13, 1997.)

California - Santa Monica

Two officers in police cruisers, followed George Washington and Darryl Hicks, both African-American men, as they drove into the parking garage of the hotel where they were staying in Santa Monica. The men were ordered out of the car at gun point, handcuffed and placed in separate police cars while the officers searched their car and checked their identification. The police justified this detention because the men allegedly resembled a description of two suspects being sought for 19 armed robberies and one of the men seemed to be "nervous". The men filed suit against the officers and the court found that neither man fit the descriptions of the robbers, and that the robberies had not even occurred in the City of Santa Monica.

(Originally published in "United by Anger," by Andrea Ford in the Los Angeles Times on November 6, 1996.)

Florida

In the summer of 1998, an African American family's vacation got off to a bad start when two officers from the Nassau County Sheriff's Department in Florida pulled them over. The officers refused to tell John Tolbert why his family was pulled over. The Tolberts stood on the side of the highway as the officers "searched the inside (of) the car, they took all of our luggage out of the trunk placing it on the highway and search(ed) every piece, they open(ed) the hood of the car, search(ed) under the hood, they looked inside the filter under the hood, they searched the trunk, they took the back lights out (of) the car inside the trunk and search(ed) it." The officers called in another officer with a K-9 unit. No drugs were found. The officers continued to humiliate the Tolberts by searching them and making Mrs. Tolbert lift her t-shirt. Finally, after enduring this 2 hour stop, the officers issued John Tolbert a warning for weaving. Said Tolbert, "If I was a white man with his family, and said I was going on vacation as I told the officer, they never would have searched the car for two hours and embarrass and humiliate me and my family. I felt like we were not citizens of the United States."

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, November 1999

Last April, Aaron Campbell was pulled over by Orange County sheriff's deputies while on the Florida turnpike. The stop ended with him being wrestled to the ground, hit with pepper spray and arrested. It turned out that Campbell was a fellow police officer, a major with the Metro-Dade Police Department, and had identified himself as such when he was pulled over for an illegal lane change and having an obscured license tag.

(Originally published in "Police Profiling Goes on Trial" in the Washington Times on January 12, 1998.)

Illinois - Chicago

Dr. William Woods, an African American based at Lake Forest Hospital in Chicago, has been the victim of racial profiling on numerous occasions. During a hearing before the city council concerning the prevalence of racial profiling in Highland Park, a liberal North Shore suburb, Dr. Woods testified that, "Things got so bad I didn't want to leave the house at 2 a.m. to deliver a baby. I've been stopped several times, and once I had guns pulled on me en route to a music lesson."

Source: Chicago Sun-Times, January 11, 2000

Indiana - Carmel

Sgt. David Smith, an African-American police officer, was pulled over while driving an unmarked car in the City of Carmel. Sgt. Smith was wearing a full uniform at the time, but he was not wearing a hat which would have identified him as a police officer. According to a complaint filed with the ACLU, the trooper who stopped Smith appeared to be "shocked and surprised" when Sgt. Smith got out of the car. The trooper explained that he had stopped Smith because he had three antennas on the rear of his car and quickly left the scene.

(Originally published in "Making Traffic Stops Based on Race," by Sheila Kennedy in the Indianapolis Star on January 29, 1997. )


Indiana - Fort Wayne

More than 200 minorities have complained that local police in Fort Wayne, Indiana, routinely pull them over, screaming racial epithets, handcuffing, searching and otherwise harassing them.

(Originally published in "New traffic Offense: DWB," by Bonnie Blackburn in the Journal Gazette on January 12, 1997.)

Kansas - Wichita

Charles McAfee, president of the Wichita branch of the NAACP, testified before a state subcommittee that in 1994, he bought his daughter, Cheryl, a red Porsche. Once while visiting her grandmother in Wichita, the police pulled her over and had their guns drawn, asking her what she was doing in the neighborhood. McAfee said his daughter still talks about the time the police stopped her for nothing.

Maryland In January 2000, William Austin, an African American firefighter, endured a 2 hour search by ten officers from the Prince George County, Maryland police department and drug units. When an officer looked through Mr. Austin‚s wallet, he commented, "We got a drug dealing fireman." The officer then proceeded to handcuff Mr. Austin. The officers searched his truck, under the truck and the engine. A dog was repeatedly placed in the truck to sniff for drugs. Mr. Austin asked the officer what they were doing and was told to "Get on your f***in‚ knees." No drugs were found in Mr. Austin's truck.

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, January 2000

Maryland

In 1997, Charles and Etta Carter, an elderly African-American couple from Pennsylvania, were stopped by Maryland State Police on their 40th wedding anniversary. The troopers searched their car and brought in drug-sniffing dogs. During the course of the search, their daughter's wedding dress was tossed onto one of the police cars and, as trucks passed on I-95, it was blown to the ground. Ms. Carter was not allowed to use the restroom during the search because police officers feared that she would flee. Their belongings were strewn along the highway, trampled and urinated on by the dogs. No drugs were found and no ticket was issued by the state trooper. The Carter's eventually reached a settlement with the Maryland State Police.

(Originally published in "Race-Profiling Again Attacked," by Catherine Brennan in the Daily Record, Volume 212, No. 4).

Nelson Walker, a young Liberian man attending college in North Carolina, was driving along I-95 in Maryland when he was pulled over by state police who said he wasn't wearing a seatbelt. The officers detained him and his two passengers for two hours as they searched for illegal drugs, weapons, or other contraband. Finding nothing in the car, they proceeded to dismantle the car and removed part of a door panel, a seat panel and part of the sunroof. The officers found nothing and in the end handed Walker a screwdriver and said, "You're going to need this" as they left the scene.

(Originally published in "Raleigh Men Join Suit Against Maryland Police," by John Sullivan in the News & Observer on June 11, 1998.)

Gary D. Rodwell repeatedly refused to consent to a search of his vehicle when he was stopped for three hours on I-95. He said that the officer threatened to arrest him and called in a canine unit to search the vehicle. When no drugs were found, the officer accused Rodwell of lying, took his keys and called a tow truck to impound the Pontiac Bonneville Rodwell was driving. Rodwell had to pay the tow truck driver to get his car back.

(Originally published in "Plaintiffs Tell of Racial Bias by State Police in I-95 Stops," by Paula Lavigne in the Baltimore Sun on June 5, 1998.)

Robert Wilkins, a Harvard Law School graduate who is a public defender in Washington, DC, went to a family funeral in Ohio in May of 1992. On the return trip he was accompanied by his aunt and uncle and 29-year old cousin. The group rented a Cadillac for the trip home. The cousin was stopped for speeding in western-Maryland while driving 60 miles per hour on the interstate. The state trooper who stopped the car ordered everyone out so that it could be searched for drugs. The group was forced to stand on the side of the interstate in the rain for an extended period of time while officers and drug-sniffing dogs searched their car. Nothing was found. Wilkins filed suit with the ACLU and received a settlement from the state of Maryland.

(Originally published in "Driving While Black on 95" in The Washington Post on November 16, 1996.)

Michigan

LaDarriss Mixon, an African American male, was pulled over by a Michigan State Police Officer supposedly for speeding. While she checked his license and registration, another officer arrived on the scene. This officer asked LaDarriss if he had any "spiders or grenades." The officer then asked if he had any sharp objects in his pockets because he wanted "to go home to his wife and kids tonight."

They proceeded to search LaDarriss¹ vehicle. He was made to sit on the hood of the car with his back to the car not allowing him to see the search being conducted. A third officer arrived at the scene and wanted to know if LaDarriss had any drugs on him. Finally, he was given a speeding ticket that was eventually dismissed in court.

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, September 1999.

Missouri - St. Louis

Representative Russell Gunn (D-St. Louis County), who is a member of the House Black Caucus, says that all his life Missouri police have pulled him over for racial reasons. Several years ago he was pulled over near Jefferson City for going five miles over the speed limit. "I said to the officer, Œyou saw a black man driving a Cadillac and you decided to stop me until you found out I was a legislator.' ŒOh no, that's not so,' the officer said. I said, Œhow can you justify stopping me when other cars have passed you and I passed you and you stopped me?' He could not justify it," said Gunn.

Source: MSNBC News, March 16, 2000

The ACLU of Eastern Missouri has documented numerous cases of racial profiling in that state. For example, one African American military officer was stopped on I-44 for what the trooper claimed was a broken brake light. When the man showed that the brake light worked, the trooper then said he was pulled over for swerving into the next lane. After detaining and questioning him for some time, the man was released. Similarly, a black man who questioned being pulled over in South St. Louis was given no reason, pulled out of his car, handcuffed, and detained while the police searched his car and interrogated him about his personal life. After an hour, he was released without explanation.

Source: ACLU press release, February 24, 2000

Nebraska

On their way home from a family vacation, the Doe¹s were stopped for weaving by Nebraska police. An officer asked John Doe if he could search the vehicle. John refused. Due to incorrect information on the rental car agreement, the car was confiscated and the family was taken to a motel. The police went through their belongings and found prescription narcotics and a syringe. John and his wife Jane were questioned separately. While being interrogated, the police did not allow Jane to use the bathroom, despite having bladder problems. They threatened to take the children to foster care and told her that John told the police that they were engaged in illegal activity.

John was jailed for possession of methamphetamines and released on bond the next day. No charges were ever filed.

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, January 2000.

New Jersey

On April 23, four young men - three African-Americans and one Hispanic - in route to a basketball clinic in North Carolina, were shot after their van was stopped for speeding and suspected drug trafficking. The men contend that they were not speeding, but were stopped because of their race. The incident is still under investigation.

(Originally published in "The Offense: 'Driving While Black'," by Hugh B. Price in Crisis, July 1998)

New York

Collie Brown was driving from Albany to Bethlehem, with his young daughter asleep in the car, when he noticed that his headlights were dimming. He stopped the car and got out to see what was causing the problem. A Bethlehem police car pulled up behind him with it's lights flashing, and the officer asked if he needed any help. When Brown replied that he did not need any assistance, the officer told him to get behind the car and proceeded to handcuff him. The officer informed Brown that the car had been reported as stolen, which was true. Brown had reported the car stolen many months earlier after it had been hot-wired in front of his home in Albany. The Albany police had recovered the car a week after it was reported stolen. At no point was Brown ever asked for his registration or diver's license prior to being handcuffed in order to prove that the car did indeed belong to him. The officer eventually retrieved Brown's wallet from the car and discovered that the car did belong to him, and Brown was released.

(Originally published in "Black driver stopped for stealing - his own car," by Dan Lynch in the Albany Times Union on January 21, 1997.)

Pennsylvania

Jonny Gammage was pulled over while driving his cousin's Jaguar at 2 A.M. on October 12. As Gammage pulled over a total of five Brentwood police cars arrived on the scene. One of the officers said that Gammage ran three red lights before stopping after the officer flashed his lights at him. The officer ordered Gammage out of the car and saw him grab something that was reportedly a weapon, but in reality was just a cellular phone. The officer knocked the phone out of Gammage's hand and a scuffle followed. The other officers beat Gammage with a flashlight, a collapsible baton and a blackjack as one put his foot on Gammage's neck. Jonny Gammage died, handcuffed, ankles bound, facedown on the pavement shortly after the incident began. He was unarmed.

(Originally published in "Under Suspicion," by Thomas Fields-Meyer, et. al in People Magazine on January 15, 1996.)

South Carolina

Sen. Maggie Glover, a democrat from Florence, said her nephew was pulled over five times in two weeks simply for driving through a high crime area on his way to and from work. He was never charged with a crime.

Source: The State, March 10, 2000

Texas

On their way home from visiting family in Texas, Kevin Moore, an African American sales person and and Gwendolyn Moore, an African American computer specialist, were stopped by the local police. The officers accused the Moores of being drug traffickers because they "fit the profile" of a couple purchasing drugs for distribution. Kevin and Gwendolyn did not consent to a search, but the officers searched the car and Gwendolyn‚s purse anyway. They then brought out their dog to sniff the purse and their luggage. The dog did not find anything, Kevin and Gwendolyn were taken to the police station and endured another invasive search. Eventually, they were fined for not wearing seat belts.

Source: Complaint filed with the ACLU, January 2000.


HTH








Evert DELOOF-SYS
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