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apropos

Dutch translation: apropos / à propos

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:apropos
Dutch translation:apropos / à propos
Entered by: BelkisDV
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19:23 Dec 13, 2001
English to Dutch translations [Non-PRO]
English term or phrase: apropos
Let other people play at other things. The king of games is still the games of kings.
This Verse, Inscribed on a stone tablet beside a polo ground south of the fabled silk route from China to the West, sums up the ancient history of what is believed to be the oldest organised sport in the world. Polo was truly a 'game of kings' for most of its reputed 2,500 years or more existence. Although the precise origins of polo are obscure and undocumented, there is ample evidence of the game's regal place in the history of Asia. No one knows where or when stick first met ball after the horse was domesticated by the tribes of Central Asia, but we know that as the use of light cavalry spread throughout Asia Minor, China and the Indian subcontinent, so did this rugged game on horseback. Polo was adopted by the kings and emperors, shahs and sultans, khans and caliphs of the ancient Persians, Arabs, Moguls and Chinse. The great rulers, real and legendary, of those early centuries were expected to be brave warriors, skilful hunters and polo players of exceptional prowess.
Scholars believe that polo originated among the Iranian tribes sometime before Darius I. Persian literature and art also gives us the richest accounts of polo in antiquity. There are a number of accounts of royal polo tournaments in Shahnameh 9th-century epic, Book of Kings.
Polo was also a popular royal pastime for many centuries in China. The Polo stick appears on royal coats of arms in China and the game was part of court life in the golden age of Chinese classical culture under Ming-Huang, the 'Radiant Emperor', who was an enthusiastic patron of equestrian activities. Less cultured, one might think, was the reaction of Emperor T'ai Tsu in a.d. 910 who. according to one source ordered all the other players beheaded after a favourite relative was killed in a match.
The Japanese learned polo from the Chinese, while across the continent the games spread as far west as Egypt with the Arab conquests of Asia Minor beginning in the 8th century. The game occupied an exhalted place in Islamic court life, Harun-al-Rashid being the first of the great Caliphs to play.
The polo stick was an important motif in Islamic, as well as Chinese, heraldry and the Jukandar, Polo Master, was a well known official in the Caliphs' entourage.
Historian's are some what surprised that the Crusaders did not bring polo back to Europe with them, but the game did reach Constantinople under the Byzantine Emperors. The 12th-centuary Emperor Manuel I Comnenos was a patron of polo and it is recorded that one of his successors, Emperor Johannes Cinnaeus, played until his leg and arm were crushed in a bad fall during a match. We derive the words 'chicane' and 'chicanery' from the middle Greek tsykanion, which in turn derives from the Persian chaugan, polo stick.
The Moslem conquerors also took the game eastward with them, to the Indian subcontinent where it was played by the Islamic rulers and adopted by local kings and princess as well.
The most spectacular tribute to polo in antiquity is a city laid out around a king's polo ground. Towards the end of the 16th century, the capital of the Safavid kingdom of Persia was moved to Isfahan and Shah Abbas the great decided to redesign the city to make it the most beautiful in the Orient. He planned his whole city around a vast, central square, the Maidan-i-Shah. The maidan, which was 500 yards long and 150 yards wide and at each end were stone goal posts eight yards apart, which is today the regulation width of a polo goal. At approximately midfield the Shah built a seven-storied palace, Ali Qapu. From the palace gallery the court and other dignitaries watched the polo matches. At the south end of the field just beyond the gaol posts Shah Abbas constructed the magnificent Masjid Shah, the king's Mosque, who mosaic domes and minarets make it one of the most beautiful in the Moslem world. Beyond the northern gaol is the elaborately decorated Qaysariya Gateway leading to the Royal Bazaar. The Stone gaol posts, as well as the palace, the mosque and the bazaar can still be seen today, although ornamental pools and gardens have replaced the field where ponies galloped and mallets flayed centuries ago.
For more than 20 centuries polo remained a favourite of the rulers if Asia who played the game or were its patrons. Their queens played as did the nobility and the mounted warriors. It was the equivalent to a national sport in the times from Japan to Egypt, from India to Byzantium. As the great Eastern empires collapsed, however, so disappeared the glittering court life of which polo has been so important a part, and the game itself was preserved only in remote villages.
If we are indebted to the ancient Iranians for originating polo, then we are equally indebted to the English for rediscovering it and taking it around the world during the latter half of the 19th century. Although polo was no longer a 'game of kings' in the 1850's, it was still being played by the men of the remote hill villages on the North West Frontier of India and in Manipur to the North east. The Manipuri taught their game to the English tea planters and cavalry officers in the district, who took to it with great enthusiasm. By the 1870's, thanks to the passionate zeal of the English for polo, it had spread to almost every country where English officers, engineers and merchants were serving. So we could say that for the past century, polo has been an international sport.
In the 1900's, polo was being played by virtually every regiment of the British and Indian armies in India, and once again occupied the place it had centuries before under the Mogul rulers of the subcontinent, that is, it had again become part of the way of life of the Indian princes.
British Officers took polo back to England with them in the last century and the first matches were played in the country in 1869 by the 10th Hussars, stationed at Hounslow, near London. The 10th Hussars also put to paper the first rules of polo.
In 1870 the first regular match was played between the 10th Hussars and the 9th lancers. Cavalry units, especially those that had seen service in India. continued to provide the top English players for many years. England's first 10-goal players F. W. Barrett and Leslie Cheape, were serving officers.
England became a centre for international polo. The first international game in 1925 between England and a team from India, Jodhpur, which Rao Rajah Hanut Singh played.
In 1876 the famous New York newspaper publisher and sportsman, James Gordon Bennett, took polo from England to the United States. He had watched polo at Hurlingham and when he returned home, took a supply of balls and mallets with him. He and a group of friends bought a wagon load of Texas quarters horses and began playing in Manhattan. The sport caught on quickly as it had elsewhere and by 1890 there were enough clubs to form a national association. Members of some of America's most prominent families, including the President Teddy Roosevelt, took up the game. Some of the American polo greats that held 10 goal status were, Dev Milburn, J. Watson Webb, Louis E. Stoddard and Thomas Hitchcock. Tommy was know has having great power and finesse, he made the kind of shots which could bring thousands of spectators to their feet to cheer him. Tommy and other players dominated polo in the United States until 1933 when the first East-West series was held. Cecil Smith, a cowboy from Texas, led the West to victory and earned himself a 10 goal rating which he held for 25 years, longer than any other players in history.
Polo began in Argentina in 1873 and by 1892 there were more clubs there than in England. No one, however, at that stage could have foreseen that the Argentine players and ponies would come to dominate world polo as they do today. In 1922 led by Jack Nelson the Argentines played and won all the major events that year much to the surprise to the English polo community. Luis Lacey was the first of the great Argentina 10 gaol players.
Polo in Australia: See Australian History
apropos / à propos
Explanation:
you can leave as it is, both spellings are correct.

For the rest of the text, I'm afrais you will have to post a job. This is not a free translation site!

HTH,

Serge L.
Selected response from:

Serge L
Local time: 17:00
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4apropos / à proposSerge L
5 +1wat betreft
Berry Prinsen
5à propos
Evert DELOOF-SYS
5à propos
4a propos "apropos"
Jan Acx


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
apropos / à propos


Explanation:
you can leave as it is, both spellings are correct.

For the rest of the text, I'm afrais you will have to post a job. This is not a free translation site!

HTH,

Serge L.

Serge L
Local time: 17:00
PRO pts in pair: 392
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Isabel Peralta
11 mins

agree  Pieter_H: Yes, but perhaps we need some more context to be sure... :-))
59 mins

agree  Leo van Zanten: I DID request more info from the asker, who obviously wants to stay anonymous :)
1 hr

agree  Joeri Van Liefferinge
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
wat betreft


Explanation:
'wat betreft' or 'wat ik zeggen wilde' but you can also leave it as it stands

Berry Prinsen
Spain
Local time: 17:00
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carla Zwanenberg
10 hrs
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
à propos


Explanation:
KudoZ' mission is providing translators who have terminology questions with some help. Translating a whole paragraph or text is really a translation job, not fellow translators helping each other out. I'd recommend:

1. Finding a good English to Dutch translator. There are many excellent translators on ProZ. To find one in the language combination you require, go to the following URL:

http://www.proz.com/v3/index.php3?sp=wi

2. You can also find a translator by placing an ad on ProZ. To do this, click on “Post a language job” on the ProZ Homepage:

http://www.proz.com/v3/index.php3?sp=wi

3. If you can’t afford a translator, use an online automatic translator. For example:

http://www.proz.com/v3/index.php3?sp=wi

A word of warning: an automatic translator only gives an approximate translation of the original. To check if the text is adequately rendered, I’d recommend doing a back translation (translating it back into the original language) before making use of it.

Yours sincerely,

Evert Deloof-Sys
proZ Moderator E-NL


Native speaker of:

16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
à propos


Explanation:
KudoZ' mission is providing translators who have terminology questions with some help. Translating a whole paragraph or text is really a translation job, not fellow translators helping each other out. I'd recommend:

1. Finding a good English to Dutch translator. There are many excellent translators on ProZ. To find one in the language combination you require, go to the following URL:

http://www.proz.com/v3/index.php3?sp=wi

2. You can also find a translator by placing an ad on ProZ. To do this, click on “Post a language job” on the ProZ Homepage:

http://www.proz.com/v3/index.php3?sp=wi

3. If you can’t afford a translator, use an online automatic translator. For example:

http://www.proz.com/v3/index.php3?sp=wi

A word of warning: an automatic translator only gives an approximate translation of the original. To check if the text is adequately rendered, I’d recommend doing a back translation (translating it back into the original language) before making use of it.

Yours sincerely,

Evert Deloof-Sys
proZ Moderator E-NL

Evert DELOOF-SYS
Belgium
Local time: 17:00
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in FlemishFlemish
PRO pts in pair: 2706
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
a propos "apropos"


Explanation:
thanks for sharing that with us. As a non-polo player I was not in the least interested.

Please, email your ideas and findings to one of the groups

Jan Acx
Spain
Local time: 17:00
Native speaker of: Native in FlemishFlemish, Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 145
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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