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recently distressed

French translation: le pire est passé !

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:recently distressed
French translation:le pire est passé !
Entered by: Tony M
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08:55 Nov 24, 2008
English to French translations [PRO]
Advertising / Public Relations
English term or phrase: recently distressed
J'en suis toujours à mes badges portés par des employés d'une grande enseigne.
Recently distressed, ne m'inspire pas grand chose. Je trouve même assez bizarre d'avoir des employés qui portent ce genre de badge.
Je précise que sur l'original, le N de recently est rajouté comme lors d'une correction de dictée avec une faute d'orthographe. Y aurait-il un jeu de mot que je ne connaisse pas ? recetly ??
fbfour
Senegal
Local time: 08:45
See explanation below...
Explanation:
I can't see any specific 'jeu de mots' with the added 'n' in recently, but I can only suggest it is part of the idea of 'distressed' — "I was distressed because my teacher has corrected my homework and I'd made a silly, elementary spelling error" — but I dont think that's the key to the overall meaning.

I can see another possible 'jeu de mots', however; we talk about furniture being 'distressed' when it is artificially 'damaged' in various ways, to make it look old; this may be dishonest (in order to pass fakes off as genuien antiques), or it may simply be done quite overtly in order to give new funriture a more homely, rustic appearance. So it is possible ther is a slight play on words there.

Otherwise, I think it's probbaly meant to say "I was feeling blue earlier, but now i'm feeling better" — it wouldn't be exactly good marketing to have staff walking round wearing badges saying "I feel bad", but suggesting "... I feel better now I'm at work and have nice customers like you in front of me" might be considered as turning a negative image into a positive one.

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-24 10:09:05 GMT)
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By the way, it's not THAT "bizarre" — it's a very American idea, of course, but I've seen it used a lot in business training situations etc. A bit like the 'emoticons' on IM systems, and the 'mood indicators' on some websites.

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-24 10:10:57 GMT)
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You also see people walking around with badges that say "Happy to help you!" etc. — though I sometimes think they'd do better to wear them at the end of a long stick, facing backwards so that THEY can read them, not the customers!

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Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-24 10:32:27 GMT)
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« Ça va beaucoup mieux maintenant ! » ???

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Note added at 2 hrs (2008-11-24 11:06:29 GMT)
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Tout comme votre texte source, cela inviterait la question « Pourquoi, ça n'allait pas tout à l'heure ? »
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:45
Grading comment
Merci beaucoup. Finalement j'ai mis "le pire est passé" mais comme l'idée vient de vous à l'origine, c'est à vous que je mets les points. :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1Le pire est passé
RemyUK
3See explanation below...
Tony M


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
See explanation below...


Explanation:
I can't see any specific 'jeu de mots' with the added 'n' in recently, but I can only suggest it is part of the idea of 'distressed' — "I was distressed because my teacher has corrected my homework and I'd made a silly, elementary spelling error" — but I dont think that's the key to the overall meaning.

I can see another possible 'jeu de mots', however; we talk about furniture being 'distressed' when it is artificially 'damaged' in various ways, to make it look old; this may be dishonest (in order to pass fakes off as genuien antiques), or it may simply be done quite overtly in order to give new funriture a more homely, rustic appearance. So it is possible ther is a slight play on words there.

Otherwise, I think it's probbaly meant to say "I was feeling blue earlier, but now i'm feeling better" — it wouldn't be exactly good marketing to have staff walking round wearing badges saying "I feel bad", but suggesting "... I feel better now I'm at work and have nice customers like you in front of me" might be considered as turning a negative image into a positive one.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-24 10:09:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, it's not THAT "bizarre" — it's a very American idea, of course, but I've seen it used a lot in business training situations etc. A bit like the 'emoticons' on IM systems, and the 'mood indicators' on some websites.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-24 10:10:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You also see people walking around with badges that say "Happy to help you!" etc. — though I sometimes think they'd do better to wear them at the end of a long stick, facing backwards so that THEY can read them, not the customers!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2008-11-24 10:32:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

« Ça va beaucoup mieux maintenant ! » ???

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2008-11-24 11:06:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Tout comme votre texte source, cela inviterait la question « Pourquoi, ça n'allait pas tout à l'heure ? »

Tony M
France
Local time: 10:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 45
Grading comment
Merci beaucoup. Finalement j'ai mis "le pire est passé" mais comme l'idée vient de vous à l'origine, c'est à vous que je mets les points. :-)
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks for the explanation. I agree, it is probably something like an emoticon. Any idea for the translation ?

Asker: Yes, why not ? Thank you :-)

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Le pire est passé


Explanation:
Suivant la même idée que Tony, mais en plus court... parce qu'il faut que ça tienne sur le badge!

RemyUK
Spain
Local time: 09:45
Works in field
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Génial !
3 mins
  -> Merci beaucoup
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Changes made by editors
Nov 25, 2008 - Changes made by Tony M:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/845441">fbfour's</a> old entry - "recently distressed" » "See explanation below..."


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