KudoZ home » English to French » Art/Literary

gravity ?

French translation: partisan; gravité

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
08:37 Aug 31, 2000
English to French translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: gravity ?
I'm hearing the word on a tape. also used during the US primaries...

"He doesn't have the gravitasse to be president."
Also, devotee in French I would guess. It sounds like devota (long a sound) Is it devotee and what about punctuation?
Thanks so much!!
Kathleen Greenlee
French translation:partisan; gravité
Explanation:
Gravitas (latin) Solemn demeanor, seriousness (From the New Shorter Oxford English Dict.)

The Ox. Superl. offers:

1 (of person, film, treatment, study, approach) sérieux m; (of tone, air, occasion, reply) gravité f; (of intention) sincérité f; in all
seriousness sérieusement;

As for the second one, devotee: It is not devotee in French, but rather (from the Oxford Superlex):


devotee / %dev@"ti: / noun (of music, sport etc) passionné/-e m/f
(of de); (of political cause) partisan/-e m/f (of de); (of person)
admirateur/-trice m/f (of de); (of religious sect) adepte mf.
Selected response from:

Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 10:45
Grading comment
Thanks so much!!! I had spent almost an hour on the web with different dictionaries and now I see that both words are English. I guess it was the way the person said them and my unfamiliarity with the gravitas that I presumed they were French. You saved me ... thanks again!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
napartisan; gravité
Yolanda Broad
nasee below
Elisabeth Moser


  

Answers


13 mins
see below


Explanation:
gravity=1.Ernst, Wuerde is the best translation from gravity in this context
into German which on the other hand translates into French as:
serieux, gravité or Wuerde: dignité.

Devot(e) is not the right translation
for gravitesse, because it means
devout, deeply religious etc.
Hope it helps.


    Harper Collins Robert, Muret-Sanders, Langenscheidt
Elisabeth Moser
United States
Local time: 10:45
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins
partisan; gravité


Explanation:
Gravitas (latin) Solemn demeanor, seriousness (From the New Shorter Oxford English Dict.)

The Ox. Superl. offers:

1 (of person, film, treatment, study, approach) sérieux m; (of tone, air, occasion, reply) gravité f; (of intention) sincérité f; in all
seriousness sérieusement;

As for the second one, devotee: It is not devotee in French, but rather (from the Oxford Superlex):


devotee / %dev@"ti: / noun (of music, sport etc) passionné/-e m/f
(of de); (of political cause) partisan/-e m/f (of de); (of person)
admirateur/-trice m/f (of de); (of religious sect) adepte mf.


    New Oxf. Shorter Dict., Eng.
    Oxford Superlex
Yolanda Broad
United States
Local time: 10:45
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 720
Grading comment
Thanks so much!!! I had spent almost an hour on the web with different dictionaries and now I see that both words are English. I guess it was the way the person said them and my unfamiliarity with the gravitas that I presumed they were French. You saved me ... thanks again!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Louise Atfield
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search