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Down with the Fuhrer! Long live the people!

French translation: A bas...

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17:42 Aug 16, 2000
English to French translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: Down with the Fuhrer! Long live the people!
just a simple phrase...meaning down with the furher and up with the people.
Rick
French translation:A bas...
Explanation:
This could translated as thus:

"A bas le Fuhrer, vive le peuple!"

"A bas" means to bring down, to lower down, if you will.
In the 17th or 18th century, the French people were getting tired of the Monarchy and the "Noblesse", so the expression "à bas" took another meaning as to kill, to decapitate, etc.. thus, 1789 the "Prise de la Bastille"

"Vive" means simply long live
as the expression:
"Le roi est mort, vive le roi"
The king is dead, long live the king

Hope all this helps.
M.A.
Selected response from:

Moli?re
Canada
Local time: 18:51
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +1See belowSébastien St-François
naA bas le Fuhrer et que vive le peuple!
alx
naA bas...Moli?re
naA bas le Fuhrer! Vive le peuple!Marc Schumacher


  

Answers


14 mins peer agreement (net): +1
See below


Explanation:
À bas le Führer! Longue vie au Peuple!

Sébastien St-François
Local time: 17:51
PRO pts in pair: 159

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Louise Atfield

Nikki Scott-Despaigne

agree  Annike THIERRY
593 days
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16 mins
A bas...


Explanation:
This could translated as thus:

"A bas le Fuhrer, vive le peuple!"

"A bas" means to bring down, to lower down, if you will.
In the 17th or 18th century, the French people were getting tired of the Monarchy and the "Noblesse", so the expression "à bas" took another meaning as to kill, to decapitate, etc.. thus, 1789 the "Prise de la Bastille"

"Vive" means simply long live
as the expression:
"Le roi est mort, vive le roi"
The king is dead, long live the king

Hope all this helps.
M.A.


    Larousse
Moli?re
Canada
Local time: 18:51
PRO pts in pair: 5
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Louise Atfield

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
A bas le Fuhrer! Vive le peuple!


Explanation:
It is the ONLY way to translate it. Take it from a French native....

Marc Schumacher
United States
Local time: 18:51
PRO pts in pair: 6

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Louise Atfield

Nikki Scott-Despaigne
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 hrs
A bas le Fuhrer et que vive le peuple!


Explanation:
This sentence respects the rythm of the original text(10 syllables), bearing in mind that this utterance is probably a chant.
the two original sentences become one, co-ordinated by "et que" that puts the two assertions in a cause-effect relation, the second bit being the consequence of the first.

alx
Local time: 23:51
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 119

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Louise Atfield
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