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you\\\'re welcome

French translation: Il n'y a pas de quoi or De rien

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08:33 Aug 31, 2001
English to French translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial
English term or phrase: you\\\'re welcome
You are welcome
Adriana
French translation:Il n'y a pas de quoi or De rien
Explanation:
Dans le langage parlé, lorsque l'autre personne remercie pour quelque chose.
Selected response from:

Elisabeth Deliège Vasconcelos
Local time: 18:30
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +6Il n'y a pas de quoi or De rien
Elisabeth Deliège Vasconcelos
na +2Je vous en prie
jgal
na +2"Je vous en prie" OR "Je t'en prie"
Alexandra Hague
na"pas de quoi" or "il n'y a pas de quoi"xxxfec139
naJe vous en prie cont.
Alexandra Hague
na -1bienvenueValerie SALIOU
na -2Bienvenue
Youri PIEDBOIS


  

Answers


2 mins peer agreement (net): -2
Bienvenue


Explanation:
or "Je vous souhaite la bienvenue"

Youri PIEDBOIS
France
Local time: 22:30
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 27
Grading comment
Thank you! You are welcome (in response)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Alexandra Hague: This is not what you're welcome means.
1 hr
  -> see below

disagree  ildiHo: agree Alexandra
5 hrs
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Thank you! You are welcome (in response)

17 mins peer agreement (net): -1
bienvenue


Explanation:
except if "your are welcome" is an answer to "Thank you". In this case, it means "de rien".

Valerie SALIOU
Local time: 22:30
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  ildiHo: sorry, no way...
4 hrs
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29 mins peer agreement (net): +6
Il n'y a pas de quoi or De rien


Explanation:
Dans le langage parlé, lorsque l'autre personne remercie pour quelque chose.

Elisabeth Deliège Vasconcelos
Local time: 18:30
Native speaker of: French
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxannekneip
4 mins

agree  Youri PIEDBOIS: but "bienvenue" is also an answer to "thank you"
2 hrs

agree  John Garside
4 hrs

agree  ildiHo
4 hrs

agree  delph
2 days 2 hrs

agree  french_translat
8 days
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1 hr peer agreement (net): +2
"Je vous en prie" OR "Je t'en prie"


Explanation:
This is the more formal way of saying "you're welcome". You should use the "vous" form for people you may not know very well, and the other for people you are close to or family members.

Alexandra Hague
Local time: 22:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 64

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ildiHo
3 hrs

agree  amarilis
4 days
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1 hr
Je vous en prie cont.


Explanation:
"Je vous en prie" also for the plural (if you would like to say "you're welcome" to more than one person at the same time).

Alexandra Hague
Local time: 22:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 64
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11 hrs
"pas de quoi" or "il n'y a pas de quoi"


Explanation:
I am assuming that this is in response to "thank you" if you mean "you are welcome" as in "you are welcome in my home" then it would be
"Vous êtes bienvenu"

xxxfec139
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16 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
Je vous en prie


Explanation:
To clarify things, 'you are welcome' if said in response to thanks, translates as "Je vous en prie" or "Je t'en prie" (see Alix's explanations of when to use which).

In informal conversation, one could also use "de rien" or "pas de quoi".

"Welcome" literally translates as "bienvenue" and I believe that in Canadian French this can also be used after thanks, like the English 'you're welcome'.

If, however, you wanted to use 'you are welcome' as part of a sentence, the translation would be different:

'you are welcome to use my car' = 'tu peux prendre ma voiture si tu veux'
'you are welcome to come back at any time' = 'tu reviendras quand tu voudras'
'you are always welcome here' = 'tu seras toujours le (la) bienvenü(e) ici'.

etc...

jgal
Local time: 22:30
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 932

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Youri PIEDBOIS: bienvenue is not only used in Canada, but also in France and Belgium
8 hrs

agree  Alexandra Hague: Sorry, Youri. I hadn't heard the Canadian and Belgian usages before. Sorry!
12 hrs
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