pot

French translation: marmite / cocotte

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:pot
French translation:marmite / cocotte
Entered by: Tony M
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11:59 Mar 8, 2018
English to French translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Cooking / Culinary / pot
English term or phrase: pot
Bonjour,

J'ai un doute pour l'expression "serve in the pot", est-ce qu'il s'agit de servir dans une casserole ?

"As a cabbage accompaniment to this comforting dish, slice a pointed spring cabbage into 5mm strips, steam it and serve it in the pot with the belly and cooking juices."

Pour réaliser l'accompagnement de chou de ce plat réconfortant, coupez un chou de printemps pointu en lamelles de 5mm, cuire à la vapeur et servir dans la casserole contenant le ventre et ses jus de cuisson.

Merci :)
Séverine T
France
Local time: 13:52
marmite
Explanation:
etc.
It means to serve it in the pot (usually a marmite, cocotte, faitout, etc.) in which the meat has been cooked — obviously the cabbage was steamrd separately, so need to be added back in with the other ingredients in the pot in which they were cooked.

It is unusual in EN to use 'pot' to describe a 'saucepan' (FR: casserole) — though do note that it can very well be sued to describe an EN 'casserole' (= marmite, cocotte!)
'Pot' usually implies something without a handle


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 minutes (2018-03-08 12:37:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

With that important extra context, one could imagine that in homely cooking, one would serve onesself from a comunal pot at table — this could indeed be the style of this particular chef, just as some serve soup for the whole table in a tureen.
However, now we know the style of restaurant, it's equally possible these might be individual 'marmites / cocottes' — and there's no reason why the eat culdn't have been cooked in them anyway (rather than just for presentation, as is also possible)

In any event, the key point is that the steamed cabbage is added to the other ingredients in the 'pot' — and given the new context, I think it is even less likely to be any kind of 'casserole' (i.e. with handle).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 40 minutes (2018-03-08 12:39:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Round out way, 'poitrine de porc' is indeed called 'ventrêche' :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 minutes (2018-03-08 12:46:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

note that the use of the word 'pot' conveys a certain deliberateness on the part of the author (or perhaps the chef?) — it is now a rather dated term and little used in practical cooking, so when it is used, it is probably deliberate and for a certain effect.

In the olden days, cooking would traditionally mainly have been done in a 'cooking pot' — probably a 'chaudron' or 'marmite'— over an open fire (think 'crémaillère'.
In more modern times, the saucepan, which had to be palced on a flat stove top, has taken over much of that role. I don't know about the US, but in GB, this often gets shortened to 'pan' (contrast with US 'cake pan', which is a 'cake tin' in GB) — we might say "remove the meat, deglaze the pan, and then return the meat to the pan".

The use of 'pot' survives mainly in a few set expressions like "take pot luck" — « manger au fortune du pot ».

So it is worth giving a passing though to just why the author chose to use this particular term here.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 13:52
Grading comment
Thanks
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3casserole ou cocotte
Posted via ProZ.com Mobile
Valérie Ourset
4 +2marmite
Tony M


  

Answers


21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
casserole ou cocotte


Explanation:
dans la même casserole que... un tout petit commentaire sur «belly», si c'est «pork belly», on parle de poitrine de porc.

Valérie Ourset
Spain
Local time: 13:52
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
Notes to answerer
Asker: Merci Valérie, en effet j'avais changé pour poitrine entre temps. Par contre, je suis un peu sceptique par rapport au fait que ce soit servi dans la même casserole. Peut-être qu'il s'agit de petite cocottes comme le suggère Tony. C'est une recette d'un chef étoilé d'où l'ambiguité.

Asker: J'avais mal lu, en fait Tony suggère aussi que ce soit servi dans le même contenant ;)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: I had already suggested 'cocotte', but I am more than ever convinced that it wouldn't be a 'casserole' (FR), which is not the usual sense of 'pot' in EN. 'Poule au pot' is not usually cooked in a 'casserole'!
18 mins

agree  Lorraine Dubuc: C'est exactement casserole voir lien. On dit aussi pot comme dans poule au pot. https://www.ricardocuisine.com/recettes/6925-poule-au-pot-et...
24 mins
  -> merci

agree  HERBET Abel: Oui pour cocotte
1 hr
  -> merci

agree  GILOU
1 hr
  -> merci
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
marmite


Explanation:
etc.
It means to serve it in the pot (usually a marmite, cocotte, faitout, etc.) in which the meat has been cooked — obviously the cabbage was steamrd separately, so need to be added back in with the other ingredients in the pot in which they were cooked.

It is unusual in EN to use 'pot' to describe a 'saucepan' (FR: casserole) — though do note that it can very well be sued to describe an EN 'casserole' (= marmite, cocotte!)
'Pot' usually implies something without a handle


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 minutes (2018-03-08 12:37:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

With that important extra context, one could imagine that in homely cooking, one would serve onesself from a comunal pot at table — this could indeed be the style of this particular chef, just as some serve soup for the whole table in a tureen.
However, now we know the style of restaurant, it's equally possible these might be individual 'marmites / cocottes' — and there's no reason why the eat culdn't have been cooked in them anyway (rather than just for presentation, as is also possible)

In any event, the key point is that the steamed cabbage is added to the other ingredients in the 'pot' — and given the new context, I think it is even less likely to be any kind of 'casserole' (i.e. with handle).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 40 minutes (2018-03-08 12:39:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Round out way, 'poitrine de porc' is indeed called 'ventrêche' :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 47 minutes (2018-03-08 12:46:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

note that the use of the word 'pot' conveys a certain deliberateness on the part of the author (or perhaps the chef?) — it is now a rather dated term and little used in practical cooking, so when it is used, it is probably deliberate and for a certain effect.

In the olden days, cooking would traditionally mainly have been done in a 'cooking pot' — probably a 'chaudron' or 'marmite'— over an open fire (think 'crémaillère'.
In more modern times, the saucepan, which had to be palced on a flat stove top, has taken over much of that role. I don't know about the US, but in GB, this often gets shortened to 'pan' (contrast with US 'cake pan', which is a 'cake tin' in GB) — we might say "remove the meat, deglaze the pan, and then return the meat to the pan".

The use of 'pot' survives mainly in a few set expressions like "take pot luck" — « manger au fortune du pot ».

So it is worth giving a passing though to just why the author chose to use this particular term here.

Tony M
France
Local time: 13:52
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 122
Grading comment
Thanks
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks Tony, that was helpful :)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Valérie Ourset
24 mins
  -> Merci, Valérie !

agree  E Gootjes
20 hrs
  -> Thanks, E.G.!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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