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up to snuff

French translation: un fessier ferme

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:up to snuff
French translation:un fessier ferme
Entered by: sabroso
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10:25 Nov 22, 2006
English to French translations [PRO]
Linguistics / body
English term or phrase: up to snuff
Some people spend a lot of time making sure their bottom is up to snuff. We do squats, lunges, walk and in the case of females, try to prevent the bottom from doing what it does best – storing fat.
sabroso
Local time: 19:46
ferme
Explanation:
"Up to snuff," meaning "satisfactory" or "measuring up to the required standard" turns out to be quite an interesting phrase. First of all, "snuff" all by itself is an intriguing word, or should I say "words," because there are really two different "snuffs." The older "snuff," of unknown origin and dating back to the 14th century, meant the burnt part of a candle wick. As a verb, this "snuff" meant "to extinguish a candle" and it is from this sense that we get our modern metaphor of "snuffing" someone's hopes (or, in slang, actually expunging the person).
The other kind of "snuff," meaning powdered tobacco inhaled through the nostrils, came along a bit later, in the 1680's. The root of this "snuff" was probably the verb "to snuff," meaning to draw up into the nose (think back to your last "snuffling" head cold), and it apparently began as an abbreviation of the Dutch word "snuiftabak," or snuffing tobacco. "Taking snuff" was a popular habit in Europe for hundreds of years, so its not surprising that it showed up in a metaphor for "satisfactory" or "usual." What remains a little unclear about "up to snuff" is whether the phrase refers to a level of acceptable quality of snuff itself, or to the wide-awake and perky attitude of someone who has just taken snuff.

If something isn't up to snuff, it doesn't meet the standard expected.
http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/up to snuff.htm...

Ici, vu le contexte, je pense qu'on veut dire : "avoir de jolies fesses", "avoir un fessier ferme"
Selected response from:

Sylvia Rochonnat
France
Local time: 19:46
Grading comment
merci pour votre proposition et les liens très utiles envoyés
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
2 +2à la hauteur
Jonathan MacKerron
3ferme
Sylvia Rochonnat
3un beau fessier - un fessier qui nous fait honneur
xxxCMJ_Trans


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
à la hauteur


Explanation:
to start with

Jonathan MacKerron
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Spaces
1 hr

agree  Anne Girardeau: J'aime bien
2 hrs
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
un beau fessier - un fessier qui nous fait honneur


Explanation:
d'autres idées

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 19:46
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 106
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
ferme


Explanation:
"Up to snuff," meaning "satisfactory" or "measuring up to the required standard" turns out to be quite an interesting phrase. First of all, "snuff" all by itself is an intriguing word, or should I say "words," because there are really two different "snuffs." The older "snuff," of unknown origin and dating back to the 14th century, meant the burnt part of a candle wick. As a verb, this "snuff" meant "to extinguish a candle" and it is from this sense that we get our modern metaphor of "snuffing" someone's hopes (or, in slang, actually expunging the person).
The other kind of "snuff," meaning powdered tobacco inhaled through the nostrils, came along a bit later, in the 1680's. The root of this "snuff" was probably the verb "to snuff," meaning to draw up into the nose (think back to your last "snuffling" head cold), and it apparently began as an abbreviation of the Dutch word "snuiftabak," or snuffing tobacco. "Taking snuff" was a popular habit in Europe for hundreds of years, so its not surprising that it showed up in a metaphor for "satisfactory" or "usual." What remains a little unclear about "up to snuff" is whether the phrase refers to a level of acceptable quality of snuff itself, or to the wide-awake and perky attitude of someone who has just taken snuff.

If something isn't up to snuff, it doesn't meet the standard expected.
http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/up to snuff.htm...

Ici, vu le contexte, je pense qu'on veut dire : "avoir de jolies fesses", "avoir un fessier ferme"


    Reference: http://www.word-detective.com/082498.html
Sylvia Rochonnat
France
Local time: 19:46
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
merci pour votre proposition et les liens très utiles envoyés
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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