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beam length

French translation: longueur entre points d'appui

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:beam length
French translation:longueur entre points d'appui
Entered by: Guylaine Ingram
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19:52 Sep 21, 2007
English to French translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Mechanics / Mech Engineering / Joints activés par ressort
English term or phrase: beam length
Due to the spring’s comparatively long ***beam length***, its loading is relatively low and has a fairly wide deflection range.

Le mot "beam" me pose probleme. Pourrait-il s'agir de la largeur du ressort ?
Guylaine Ingram
United States
Local time: 04:37
longueur entre points d'appui
Explanation:
It refers to the length between the points of attachment or support.
If it were the 'largeur' (interpreting 'beam' as in naval engineering, i.e. side-to-side) then a 'long beam length' would allow higher loading and smaller deflection.


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Note added at 1 hr (2007-09-21 21:31:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In the branch of applied mathematics known as 'statics', any long object bearing a load is referred to as a 'beam'. For the purposes of the theory, a beam is usually weightless and of zero thickness and width - it's only known dimensions are its length between the supports, the position of the load and its flexibility.

The source text sentence is describing the theoretical configuration of the spring, hence the use of 'beam'; as 1045 says, this translates as 'poutre'.

We don't know what type of spring it is (in the 'real world'), so we can't assume it has a 'tige', as suggested by wolfheart. If it were the leaf spring of a motor-car, for example, it would have one or more 'lames' instead of a 'tige'.
Selected response from:

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 06:37
Grading comment
Thank you all. Based on the rest of the document, that spring has no "tige" and in this particular case "beam" is not "poutre". Anyway, thanks again!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1longueur de la poutre (cantilever)
svetlana cosquéric
2 +2poutre1045
4longueur entre points d'appui
Robin Levey
4longueur de la tige du ressort
wolfheart


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
longueur de la tige du ressort


Explanation:
le texte parle clairement de : "spring's ...... beam length"

wolfheart
United States
Local time: 05:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 240

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Robin Levey: We don't know if the spring has a 'tige'.
32 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
longueur entre points d'appui


Explanation:
It refers to the length between the points of attachment or support.
If it were the 'largeur' (interpreting 'beam' as in naval engineering, i.e. side-to-side) then a 'long beam length' would allow higher loading and smaller deflection.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-09-21 21:31:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In the branch of applied mathematics known as 'statics', any long object bearing a load is referred to as a 'beam'. For the purposes of the theory, a beam is usually weightless and of zero thickness and width - it's only known dimensions are its length between the supports, the position of the load and its flexibility.

The source text sentence is describing the theoretical configuration of the spring, hence the use of 'beam'; as 1045 says, this translates as 'poutre'.

We don't know what type of spring it is (in the 'real world'), so we can't assume it has a 'tige', as suggested by wolfheart. If it were the leaf spring of a motor-car, for example, it would have one or more 'lames' instead of a 'tige'.

Robin Levey
Chile
Local time: 06:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 162
Grading comment
Thank you all. Based on the rest of the document, that spring has no "tige" and in this particular case "beam" is not "poutre". Anyway, thanks again!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
longueur de la poutre (cantilever)


Explanation:
www.theses.ulaval.ca/2006/23791/ch06.html

www.cnam.fr/maths/Membres/saiac/TP2_B5.pdf

svetlana cosquéric
France
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mohamed Mehenoun
20 hrs
  -> thank you!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
poutre


Explanation:
*

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day16 hrs (2007-09-23 11:56:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

beam = poutre
beam length = longueur de la poutre

1045
Canada
Local time: 05:37
PRO pts in category: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robin Levey: yes, beam translates as poutre
1 hr
  -> Merci mediamatrix ...

agree  Mohamed Mehenoun
1 day14 hrs
  -> M² = Merci Mohamed ...
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