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WN

French translation: bon état général BEG

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:WN WD
French translation:bon état général BEG
Entered by: SJLD
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15:25 Feb 7, 2012
English to French translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general)
English term or phrase: WN
Dans le tableau Review of systems (que j'ai traduit par Signes fonctionnels) d'un rapport médical
On trouve les abréviations WN WD NAD à côté de Consitutional
Ensuite viennent les yeux, les voies respiratoires,...

Je vous remercie encore pour votre aide précieuse
Kévin Bacquet
France
Local time: 05:39
bon état général BEG
Explanation:
I would tend to use BEG to cover WD WN (well-developed well-nourished)

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Note added at 2 hrs (2012-02-07 17:43:23 GMT)
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http://www.aafp.org/fpm/2007/0500/p60.html

The phrase “well-nourished, well-developed” has reared its generically bland head all over physicians' medical documentation, from podiatrists all the way up to neurologists. What does this phrase really mean? The logical assumption is that it means “adequately fed and grown.” What other meaning can there be? Plenty, it turns out.

In my review of medical documents, I see this confusing phrase abbreviated almost always as WNWD. For example, “A WNWD patient presents to discuss obesity.” In this case, the physician seems to use WNWD to describe a patient who is approaching obesity; however, the term “overweight” would have been more helpful.

Other physicians use WNWD to describe patients with body mass indices approaching emaciation, as in “WNWD with BMI of 16.” In this case, if the person was just thin, the physician should have stated that fact. Or if the person appeared anorexic or cachectic, why didn't the physician just say so?

Still other physicians use WNWD to describe the patient who is neither excessively thin nor heavy; however, even for these patients, more descriptive terms or phrases would be more helpful.
Selected response from:

SJLD
Local time: 05:39
Grading comment
Merci beaucoup !
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4bon état général BEG
SJLD
Summary of reference entries provided
réfs pour les 3
GILOU
Isabelle Cluzel

  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
wn
bon état général BEG


Explanation:
I would tend to use BEG to cover WD WN (well-developed well-nourished)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2012-02-07 17:43:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.aafp.org/fpm/2007/0500/p60.html

The phrase “well-nourished, well-developed” has reared its generically bland head all over physicians' medical documentation, from podiatrists all the way up to neurologists. What does this phrase really mean? The logical assumption is that it means “adequately fed and grown.” What other meaning can there be? Plenty, it turns out.

In my review of medical documents, I see this confusing phrase abbreviated almost always as WNWD. For example, “A WNWD patient presents to discuss obesity.” In this case, the physician seems to use WNWD to describe a patient who is approaching obesity; however, the term “overweight” would have been more helpful.

Other physicians use WNWD to describe patients with body mass indices approaching emaciation, as in “WNWD with BMI of 16.” In this case, if the person was just thin, the physician should have stated that fact. Or if the person appeared anorexic or cachectic, why didn't the physician just say so?

Still other physicians use WNWD to describe the patient who is neither excessively thin nor heavy; however, even for these patients, more descriptive terms or phrases would be more helpful.

SJLD
Local time: 05:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 693
Grading comment
Merci beaucoup !
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Reference comments


3 mins
Reference: réfs pour les 3

Reference information:
12 Apr 2006 – Vital signs stable (VSS). Well-developed and well-nourished in non-apparent distress (WD/WN in NAD). Chest: Clear to auscultation bilaterally ...

GILOU
France
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 1645
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins
Reference

Reference information:
rien a voir avec la medecine mais j'ai trouve ca : 'well nourished well developed and no acute distress'
pour NAD : 'No abnormality detected'

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Note added at 6 minutes (2012-02-07 15:32:03 GMT)
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pardon, a voir avec la medecine, j'avais mal lu la page...

Isabelle Cluzel
France
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in category: 8
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Changes made by editors
Feb 14, 2012 - Changes made by SJLD:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/603488">Kévin Bacquet's</a> old entry - "WN" » "bon état général BEG"


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